Alex Santoso's Comments

@Will L - You can find a lot of reports on the Danish economic model. Denmark has one of the world's largest governments and the highest taxation rates, yet it's also one of the world's most prosperous countries.

It's far more productive to look into cases where our expectations do not meet reality, rather than simply discounting them by chalking things up to being manufactured by socialists/tea partiers/opposite-political-spectrum-who-is-obviously-oh-so-obviously-wrong.

@agricola - I think all countries have "socialist" components to their domestic and economic policy. US has unemployment benefits, for instance.
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@Chuck - just to throw gasoline to the fire, how do you explain that the 3 countries with the highest income mobility of new generation - meaning that the new generation is better off than the older one - are all very liberal countries?
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I've always wondered, given the high cost of design and tooling, why car companies create cars only for certain markets and not others.

It's easy to understand reserving small city cars for the narrow streets of European cities, but the Chevy Orlando seems like a sizable minivan. Why not sell it in the United States?
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@shirkr - *ding* ;)

Social studies are interesting, though often times they're non-sensical (or darned obvious) on the surface.

In this particular study, I think there has always been people who crave attention. Facebook is an (easy) outlet for that. Had there been no Facebook, they'd still be clamoring for attention.

Dunno how that conversation got turned to brand loyalty though.
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@Dazee - it provides an insight into one of the most important human activities. How many children parents decide to have ultimately determine a nation's birth rate (which is too low for countries with declining population like Japan and too high for many third world countries).
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@DaveL - not, not fraud, but they probably hastened the demise of the music CD (the article described how used CD sales are actually still healthy - it's just the new CD sales that had pretty much died).
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@shirkr - I think it goes deeper than that. Procreation is the most important biological process there is, and despite our higher consciousness, humans are basically programmed to procreate.

That's why there's the "biological clock" - basically an overwhelming need (mostly in women, though not all women have this) to have a child. It's biologically hardwired.
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As a parent myself, I'm well aware of how we "whitewash" the pain of raising kids and glorify the joy - but it's much more than that. There's selective memory going on so that we remember the joy more than the pain.

It's kind of like giving birth: the memory of 30 second of birth trumps the 24 hours of labor pain.

I think Splint Chesthair is on to something: the joy of parenthood may just be an evolutionary mechanism. After all, the human race depends on people having children!
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The Magic Castle in LA was neat! We went to dinner and performance a while ago ... the gimmick was that you had to be "invited" by a practicing member of the Magic Castle's magician guild.
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I found it interesting that it noted Mary Shelley's Frankenstein as the first science-fiction novel (someone more familiar with the history of the genre should probably chime in).

I think it was the first "mad scientist" novel ever written.
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@ted - absolutely! When I was in grad school (in a hospital), there was a study about the hand washing habit of doctors.

They had assumed that male doctors washed their hands more often than the general public, simply because they're doctors and they should know better.

So someone devised a study to watch these docs. They pretended they were fussing with their hair, washing their glasses, etc. They noticed a significant percentage of doctors never washed their hands!

I tried to Google the study, but couldn't find it. I remember the outcome of the study, because right after I read it, I was in the bathroom and a professor (who's also a practicing doctor) came in, did his business, and left without washing his hands!
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Profile for Alex Santoso

  • Member Since 2012/07/17


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