<![CDATA[Neatorama]]>https://www.neatorama.com/vosa/theme/neato2/media/logo.gifNeatoramahttps://www.neatorama.com/<![CDATA[Amazing Athlete Contact Juggles with a Sword]]>

Titos Tsai is a contact juggler from Taiwan. Contact juggling involves moving balls and other objects around one's body without losing contact. Tsai is an absolute master of that craft. Watch him, seemingly without effort, move a huge sword around his body while gracefully dancing. He doesn't drop the sword or cut himself with it even once.

You can see more of his fantastic work on Instagram.

-via Geekologie

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Titos Tsai is a contact juggler from Taiwan. Contact juggling involves moving balls and other objects around one's body without losing contact. Tsai is an absolute master of that craft. Watch him, seemingly without effort, move a huge sword around his body while gracefully dancing. He doesn't drop the sword or cut himself with it even once.

You can see more of his fantastic work on Instagram.

-via Geekologie

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<![CDATA[Embroidered Scenes from Nostalgic Home Movies]]>

When her mother died, French artist Cécile Davidovici watched old VHS home movies of her family back in 1988. To reinforce the permanence of the relationship now separated by death, she embroidered still images from those home movies to "anchor herself in the moment."

Davidovici calls the series, appropriately, 1988. You can see more examples on her website and Instagram.

-via Colossal

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When her mother died, French artist Cécile Davidovici watched old VHS home movies of her family back in 1988. To reinforce the permanence of the relationship now separated by death, she embroidered still images from those home movies to "anchor herself in the moment."

Davidovici calls the series, appropriately, 1988. You can see more examples on her website and Instagram.

-via Colossal

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<![CDATA[How to Eat Spaghetti with Scissors]]>

Modern problems require bold solutions. For example, how do you eat spaghetti without spilling it everywhere, including on yourself?

You use a pair of scissors, as this genius does. Just snip off the ends of your forkful before putting the remainder in your mouth. As he says, "Beats crawling around with a fork."

We salute you, sir. Audentes Fortuna iuvat.

-via Dave Barry

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Modern problems require bold solutions. For example, how do you eat spaghetti without spilling it everywhere, including on yourself?

You use a pair of scissors, as this genius does. Just snip off the ends of your forkful before putting the remainder in your mouth. As he says, "Beats crawling around with a fork."

We salute you, sir. Audentes Fortuna iuvat.

-via Dave Barry

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<![CDATA[Meet The Blind Man Who Taught Himself To See]]>

Daniel Kish is a man who grew up adapted to blindness. At infancy, both of his eyes were removed to save his life from retinoblastoma, a cancer that attacks the retinas. Now at 44, Kish has taught himself how he can navigate the world, even with a handicap. He uses sounds to perceive the environment around him, as Men’s Journal detailed: 

 Kish has trained himself to hear these slight echoes and to interpret their meaning. Standing on his front stoop, he could visualize, with an extraordinary degree of precision, the two pine trees on his front lawn, the curb at the edge of his street, and finally, a bit too far from that curb, my rental car. Kish has given a name to what he does – he calls it “FlashSonar” – but it’s more commonly known by its scientific term, echolocation.
Bats, of course, use echolocation. Beluga whales too. Dolphins. And Daniel Kish. He is so accomplished at echolocation that he’s able to pedal his mountain bike through streets heavy with traffic and on precipitous dirt trails. He climbs trees. He camps out, by himself, deep in the wilderness. He’s lived for weeks at a time in a tiny cabin a two-mile hike from the nearest road. He travels around the globe. He’s a skilled cook, an avid swimmer, a fluid dance partner. Essentially, though in a way that is unfamiliar to nearly any other human being, Kish can see.

image via Men’s Journal

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Daniel Kish is a man who grew up adapted to blindness. At infancy, both of his eyes were removed to save his life from retinoblastoma, a cancer that attacks the retinas. Now at 44, Kish has taught himself how he can navigate the world, even with a handicap. He uses sounds to perceive the environment around him, as Men’s Journal detailed: 

 Kish has trained himself to hear these slight echoes and to interpret their meaning. Standing on his front stoop, he could visualize, with an extraordinary degree of precision, the two pine trees on his front lawn, the curb at the edge of his street, and finally, a bit too far from that curb, my rental car. Kish has given a name to what he does – he calls it “FlashSonar” – but it’s more commonly known by its scientific term, echolocation.
Bats, of course, use echolocation. Beluga whales too. Dolphins. And Daniel Kish. He is so accomplished at echolocation that he’s able to pedal his mountain bike through streets heavy with traffic and on precipitous dirt trails. He climbs trees. He camps out, by himself, deep in the wilderness. He’s lived for weeks at a time in a tiny cabin a two-mile hike from the nearest road. He travels around the globe. He’s a skilled cook, an avid swimmer, a fluid dance partner. Essentially, though in a way that is unfamiliar to nearly any other human being, Kish can see.

image via Men’s Journal

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<![CDATA[Why Can We Not Brush Off Bad Movies?]]>

There was a time when people saw a bad movie, and it ended at that. There would be no long threads on Twitter (or any social media platform) on the reasons why it sucked, and how it could have been better. The discourse on bad movies remains as there is still unused footage and  behind the scenes clips that the producers release for the public to consume. Read more on the reasons why we can’t let go of bad movies at Cracked.

image via wikimedia commons

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There was a time when people saw a bad movie, and it ended at that. There would be no long threads on Twitter (or any social media platform) on the reasons why it sucked, and how it could have been better. The discourse on bad movies remains as there is still unused footage and  behind the scenes clips that the producers release for the public to consume. Read more on the reasons why we can’t let go of bad movies at Cracked.

image via wikimedia commons

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<![CDATA["Take Poo to the Loo"]]>

"Take Poo to the Loo", commonly shortened to "Poo2Loo", was an Indian social media campaign led by UNICEF

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"Take Poo to the Loo", commonly shortened to "Poo2Loo", was an Indian social media campaign led by UNICEF

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<![CDATA[New Wearable Device Could Safely Improve Motor Function After Stroke]]>

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that every 40 seconds, someone in the United States will suffer from a stroke. Every 4 minutes, a person dies from a stroke. It is the fifth leading cause of death for Americans, and it is also a leading cause of long-term disability. Truly, it is a force to be reckoned with. Thankfully, our sciences are advancing, and new tools that help ease the suffering of those who are sick are being developed by the minute, such as this one.

A non-invasive, wearable, magnetic brain stimulation device could improve motor function in stroke patients, according to preliminary late breaking science presented… at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2020…
[...]
The robustness of the increase in physiological brain activity was surprising. With only 30 subjects, a statistically significant change was seen in brain activity,” said lead study author David Chiu, M.D., director of the Eddy Scurlock Stroke Center at Houston Methodist Hospital in Texas. “If confirmed in a larger multicenter trial, the results would have enormous implications. This technology would be the first proven treatment for recovery of motor function after chronic ischemic stroke.”

I wonder how much it will cost, though, but I guess it will be expensive. Still, this is great news!

(Image Credit: Blessy John/ Neuroscience News)

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that every 40 seconds, someone in the United States will suffer from a stroke. Every 4 minutes, a person dies from a stroke. It is the fifth leading cause of death for Americans, and it is also a leading cause of long-term disability. Truly, it is a force to be reckoned with. Thankfully, our sciences are advancing, and new tools that help ease the suffering of those who are sick are being developed by the minute, such as this one.

A non-invasive, wearable, magnetic brain stimulation device could improve motor function in stroke patients, according to preliminary late breaking science presented… at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2020…
[...]
The robustness of the increase in physiological brain activity was surprising. With only 30 subjects, a statistically significant change was seen in brain activity,” said lead study author David Chiu, M.D., director of the Eddy Scurlock Stroke Center at Houston Methodist Hospital in Texas. “If confirmed in a larger multicenter trial, the results would have enormous implications. This technology would be the first proven treatment for recovery of motor function after chronic ischemic stroke.”

I wonder how much it will cost, though, but I guess it will be expensive. Still, this is great news!

(Image Credit: Blessy John/ Neuroscience News)

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<![CDATA[The Life Of Real-Life Disney Princesses]]>

We see different mascots and people in costume playing as a particular Disney character at Disney World. From Mickey Mouse to the different Disney princesses, these people are trained and paid to play the part of the iconic characters for the customer’s (specifically, children’s) enjoyment. But have you ever wondered what it’s like to be hired as one of the people who will dress up and roleplay at the theme park? Kristen Sotakoun, a former employee, shared her experience at Vox

It may be different now, but for me, the training was five days. When you’re accepted in entertainment, nobody is just a princess or just a prince. You have to be trained and approved in fur characters first. The first three days of training is sitting and watching videos of what you can or can’t do. Learning autographs. There’s a really creepy portion where you wear just the head and hands of the character. So you’re in business-casual but the hands and head of Chip and Dale. The last two days of training you go out into the park with character attendants, and meet people. It was wild to me, I thought the training would last about a month. And once you’re approved for fur, it’s two days of training for each “face character” [characters like Belle or Princess Jasmine that don’t wear a mask].
I was so stoked when I got through training, and then I did three weeks in a row of just Winnie the Pooh.

image Kristen Sotakoun via Vox

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We see different mascots and people in costume playing as a particular Disney character at Disney World. From Mickey Mouse to the different Disney princesses, these people are trained and paid to play the part of the iconic characters for the customer’s (specifically, children’s) enjoyment. But have you ever wondered what it’s like to be hired as one of the people who will dress up and roleplay at the theme park? Kristen Sotakoun, a former employee, shared her experience at Vox

It may be different now, but for me, the training was five days. When you’re accepted in entertainment, nobody is just a princess or just a prince. You have to be trained and approved in fur characters first. The first three days of training is sitting and watching videos of what you can or can’t do. Learning autographs. There’s a really creepy portion where you wear just the head and hands of the character. So you’re in business-casual but the hands and head of Chip and Dale. The last two days of training you go out into the park with character attendants, and meet people. It was wild to me, I thought the training would last about a month. And once you’re approved for fur, it’s two days of training for each “face character” [characters like Belle or Princess Jasmine that don’t wear a mask].
I was so stoked when I got through training, and then I did three weeks in a row of just Winnie the Pooh.

image Kristen Sotakoun via Vox

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<![CDATA[Complete History Of Pokemon Rumours]]>

The Pokemon franchise has been around for a long time. It’s not surprising to see the spread of urban legends that players can try to spot in the games. DidYouKnowGaming compiles all the urban legends and rumours all throughout the Pokemon games. Maybe you can try and see if these urban legends are real! 

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The Pokemon franchise has been around for a long time. It’s not surprising to see the spread of urban legends that players can try to spot in the games. DidYouKnowGaming compiles all the urban legends and rumours all throughout the Pokemon games. Maybe you can try and see if these urban legends are real! 

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<![CDATA[The Last Laugh]]>

When Twitter user Logan Evans was in his senior year of high school, his teacher laughed at him when he said that he would become a lawyer. But it seems that Evans has the last laugh, as he was just accepted into law school with a scholarship. Evans made sure that his teacher knows that he was in fact, on the way to becoming a lawyer through an email. The teacher actually replied to his email, and it’s less hostile and more wholesome.

image via Twitter

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When Twitter user Logan Evans was in his senior year of high school, his teacher laughed at him when he said that he would become a lawyer. But it seems that Evans has the last laugh, as he was just accepted into law school with a scholarship. Evans made sure that his teacher knows that he was in fact, on the way to becoming a lawyer through an email. The teacher actually replied to his email, and it’s less hostile and more wholesome.

image via Twitter

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<![CDATA[62-Year Old Man Sets World Record for Planking]]>

62-year old personal trainer and former Marine George Hood first gained a Guinness World Record for planking in 2011. Then his record was surpassed by a Chinese competitor. Now Hood holds the top title again since holding the planking for 8 hours, 15 minutes, and 15 seconds on February 15.

Hood's training regimen was brutal. Forbes reports:

In training for last month’s attempt, Hood reportedly did approximately 674,000 sit ups and 270,000 push ups. That’s totally Hood. To put these numbers in perspective, if you did a hundred sit-ups a day, it would take you over 18 years to do that many sit-ups. 

-via Stuff | Image: Guinness World Records

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62-year old personal trainer and former Marine George Hood first gained a Guinness World Record for planking in 2011. Then his record was surpassed by a Chinese competitor. Now Hood holds the top title again since holding the planking for 8 hours, 15 minutes, and 15 seconds on February 15.

Hood's training regimen was brutal. Forbes reports:

In training for last month’s attempt, Hood reportedly did approximately 674,000 sit ups and 270,000 push ups. That’s totally Hood. To put these numbers in perspective, if you did a hundred sit-ups a day, it would take you over 18 years to do that many sit-ups. 

-via Stuff | Image: Guinness World Records

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<![CDATA[Vultures: the Acid-Puking, Plague-Busting Heroes of the Ecosystem]]>

Vultures are fairly disgusting birds, and when you see one circling in a movie, it's never a good sign. But every species has its niche in the ecosystem, and vultures fill the role of nature's cleanup crew. "It's a dirty job, but someone's gotta do it." And where vultures are endangered, we find out how valuable they really are.  

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Vultures are fairly disgusting birds, and when you see one circling in a movie, it's never a good sign. But every species has its niche in the ecosystem, and vultures fill the role of nature's cleanup crew. "It's a dirty job, but someone's gotta do it." And where vultures are endangered, we find out how valuable they really are.  

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<![CDATA[When Appalachian Resorts Became Prisons for Axis Diplomats]]>

Although the war had been going on for years, the US entered World War II rather suddenly when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. The secrecy of the attack left Axis ambassadors, consular officials, and their families behind enemy lines in America. The government had to make a quick decision about what to do with the Japanese diplomats, as well as those from Germany and Italy.

Newspapers’ vitriolic headlines, editorials, and racist caricatures of buck-toothed Japanese fanned the flames of animosity, especially against the two most reviled men in America: Ambassador Kichisaburō Nomura and Special Envoy Saburō Kurusu, who had been sitting in Secretary of State Cordell Hull’s office as the bombs rained down on Hawaii. They were two among hundreds of Axis diplomats living and working in the nation’s capital. Fearful of envoys’ ongoing communications with home, the Roosevelt administration made a controversial decision to send these foreign nationals and their families to remote luxury hotels. The primary goal of this plan was reciprocity—the hope that good treatment of enemy diplomats here would engender the same for American counterparts trapped overseas. (It did not.)

This roundup, detention and eventual repatriation of more than a thousand Axis diplomats and dependents, little remembered today, was a cause célèbre that rocked the nation and enraged many Americans. “May I ask why our government deems it necessary to pamper the delegation of Yellow Rats by housing them at one of the country’s finest winter resorts?” fumed one Washington state resident to Senator Monrad Wallgren. A railroad executive from New York wrote to Under Secretary of State Sumner Welles: “As a patriotic American for many generations, [wouldn’t] any old wooden shack be good enough? Why coddle German and Jap prisoners who are all bitter enemies of our country, and who would ruin us if they had half a chance?”

The diplomats were assigned to three luxury hotels: the Homestead in Hot Springs, Virginia, the Grove Park Inn in Asheville, North Carolina, and the Greenbriar in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. The Greenbriar was the most successful of the diplomatic internments due to the attitude and leadership of its management. The locals hated having the enemy among them, the diplomats complained about the accommodations, and the employees were vilified from both sides. Yet they stood up and offered the utmost in service because the government had decreed that's how it should be. Could the Greenbriar's wartime professionalism have been a factor in it later becoming a congressional fallout shelter? At any rate, read how the staff at the Greenbriar learned to be diplomats themselves as they swallowed their pride and did their patriotic duty at Smithsonian.

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Although the war had been going on for years, the US entered World War II rather suddenly when Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. The secrecy of the attack left Axis ambassadors, consular officials, and their families behind enemy lines in America. The government had to make a quick decision about what to do with the Japanese diplomats, as well as those from Germany and Italy.

Newspapers’ vitriolic headlines, editorials, and racist caricatures of buck-toothed Japanese fanned the flames of animosity, especially against the two most reviled men in America: Ambassador Kichisaburō Nomura and Special Envoy Saburō Kurusu, who had been sitting in Secretary of State Cordell Hull’s office as the bombs rained down on Hawaii. They were two among hundreds of Axis diplomats living and working in the nation’s capital. Fearful of envoys’ ongoing communications with home, the Roosevelt administration made a controversial decision to send these foreign nationals and their families to remote luxury hotels. The primary goal of this plan was reciprocity—the hope that good treatment of enemy diplomats here would engender the same for American counterparts trapped overseas. (It did not.)

This roundup, detention and eventual repatriation of more than a thousand Axis diplomats and dependents, little remembered today, was a cause célèbre that rocked the nation and enraged many Americans. “May I ask why our government deems it necessary to pamper the delegation of Yellow Rats by housing them at one of the country’s finest winter resorts?” fumed one Washington state resident to Senator Monrad Wallgren. A railroad executive from New York wrote to Under Secretary of State Sumner Welles: “As a patriotic American for many generations, [wouldn’t] any old wooden shack be good enough? Why coddle German and Jap prisoners who are all bitter enemies of our country, and who would ruin us if they had half a chance?”

The diplomats were assigned to three luxury hotels: the Homestead in Hot Springs, Virginia, the Grove Park Inn in Asheville, North Carolina, and the Greenbriar in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. The Greenbriar was the most successful of the diplomatic internments due to the attitude and leadership of its management. The locals hated having the enemy among them, the diplomats complained about the accommodations, and the employees were vilified from both sides. Yet they stood up and offered the utmost in service because the government had decreed that's how it should be. Could the Greenbriar's wartime professionalism have been a factor in it later becoming a congressional fallout shelter? At any rate, read how the staff at the Greenbriar learned to be diplomats themselves as they swallowed their pride and did their patriotic duty at Smithsonian.

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<![CDATA[17th-century London Death Roulette]]>

If you lived in London in 1665, your chances of dying were fairly high. Communicable diseases were rampant, sanitation was hit-and-miss, and health care providers didn't have a lot to offer. What you died from could be pretty much anything, since the science of diagnosis was often a matter of guessing. London employed searchers of the dead to determine a person's cause of death, which was important in tracking victims of the plague. These searchers were mostly older, uneducated women who had no better opportunities, and they were subject to pressure and bribery. Therefore, London records show causes of death as simple as old age, falls, and childbirth, and as inexplicable as surfeit, grief, and rising of the lights. While the deceased might have been embarrassed to die of "winde," the survivors would be okay with anything that didn't lead to a quarantine of the remaining family.



Matt Round created the game Death Roulette, in which you spin the wheel (figuratively) to be assigned a random death date and cause based on the actual records from that week in London. As you see, I died of winde, which is "paroxysms of severe gastrointestinal pain," or just what you thought anyway, farts. If the odds were also based on the records, most of us would die from the plague. -via Boing Boing

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If you lived in London in 1665, your chances of dying were fairly high. Communicable diseases were rampant, sanitation was hit-and-miss, and health care providers didn't have a lot to offer. What you died from could be pretty much anything, since the science of diagnosis was often a matter of guessing. London employed searchers of the dead to determine a person's cause of death, which was important in tracking victims of the plague. These searchers were mostly older, uneducated women who had no better opportunities, and they were subject to pressure and bribery. Therefore, London records show causes of death as simple as old age, falls, and childbirth, and as inexplicable as surfeit, grief, and rising of the lights. While the deceased might have been embarrassed to die of "winde," the survivors would be okay with anything that didn't lead to a quarantine of the remaining family.



Matt Round created the game Death Roulette, in which you spin the wheel (figuratively) to be assigned a random death date and cause based on the actual records from that week in London. As you see, I died of winde, which is "paroxysms of severe gastrointestinal pain," or just what you thought anyway, farts. If the odds were also based on the records, most of us would die from the plague. -via Boing Boing

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<![CDATA[The Coolest Toys From Toy Fair 2020]]>

It’s February once again, and that means it’s another year for the annual Toy Fair in New York City. Geek.com lists 15 toys from the said fair which they believe are the best. Some of the toys featured are Pokemon toys like Eevee and Snorlax, Star Wars toys like Baby Yoda and the Darksaber, as well as Minecraft toys, and the remote-controlled version of Tesla’s Cybertruck.

Check them out over at the site.

(Image Credit: Kotaku)

(Image Credit: Geek.com)

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It’s February once again, and that means it’s another year for the annual Toy Fair in New York City. Geek.com lists 15 toys from the said fair which they believe are the best. Some of the toys featured are Pokemon toys like Eevee and Snorlax, Star Wars toys like Baby Yoda and the Darksaber, as well as Minecraft toys, and the remote-controlled version of Tesla’s Cybertruck.

Check them out over at the site.

(Image Credit: Kotaku)

(Image Credit: Geek.com)

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