<![CDATA[Neatorama]]>https://www.neatorama.com/vosa/theme/neato2/media/logo.gifNeatoramahttps://www.neatorama.com/<![CDATA[Improv Everywhere Turned NYC Phone Booths Into Coworking Spaces]]>

The amazing people at Improv Everywhere recently morphed a couple of old, unused phone booths into coworking spaces for rent.

They told those who stopped by that the rent was a steal in N.Y.C. at $300 a month, & that lots of people were fans because they never had to open a window for air or take a break to vape.

Via Boing Boing & Improv Everywhere

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The amazing people at Improv Everywhere recently morphed a couple of old, unused phone booths into coworking spaces for rent.

They told those who stopped by that the rent was a steal in N.Y.C. at $300 a month, & that lots of people were fans because they never had to open a window for air or take a break to vape.

Via Boing Boing & Improv Everywhere

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<![CDATA[A 1972 Solar Storm Set Off 4,000 Sea Mines]]>

In the North Vietnamese port of Hai Phong, on August 4th 1972, dozens of mines exploded in an instant with no passing ships to trigger them.

An invisible force originating 93 million miles away had set them off. Earlier that month the sun produced a series of solar flares so strong they distorted the magnetic field on the side of the earth they hit weeks later.

Bright aurora skies appeared all over the U.S. and Europe, as far south as Spain. And had the solar storm coincided with a NASA mission, the particles colliding with the ship would have incapacitated, and possibly killed, the astronauts.

Scientists believe it's one of the top two solar storms in recorded history.

Read more on Atlas Obscura.

Image Credits: NASA, & Wikimedia Commons

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In the North Vietnamese port of Hai Phong, on August 4th 1972, dozens of mines exploded in an instant with no passing ships to trigger them.

An invisible force originating 93 million miles away had set them off. Earlier that month the sun produced a series of solar flares so strong they distorted the magnetic field on the side of the earth they hit weeks later.

Bright aurora skies appeared all over the U.S. and Europe, as far south as Spain. And had the solar storm coincided with a NASA mission, the particles colliding with the ship would have incapacitated, and possibly killed, the astronauts.

Scientists believe it's one of the top two solar storms in recorded history.

Read more on Atlas Obscura.

Image Credits: NASA, & Wikimedia Commons

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<![CDATA[What Kind of Person Steals Their Co-workers’ Lunch?]]>

Any workplace with several people in the same place will eventually confront a lunch theft. The victim will be upset, not only because they have no lunch, but also because they feel violated, and suddenly they cannot trust the people they spend do much time with. Katie Heaney's lunch was stolen. She was angry, of course, but she also offered amnesty if as he could talk to the perpetrator and find out what went on in their mind to cause the theft. The lunch thief was not found, so she went online to find someone who had stolen co-worker's food and talk to them about it. She wanted to know what made a lunch thief different from the rest of us.    

Before I called Rob, I expected — hoped, really — that our conversation would reveal something sinister about his personality, perhaps something tellingly psychopathic. But Rob seems like a nice guy. He expresses remorse for his actions, sounding genuinely devastated when I ask him to imagine his victims gazing sadly into the refrigerator. “People get hurt, I guess,” he says. “Knowing you have that soda there in the fridge at 3 or 4 in the afternoon when you really need it … that’s gotta suck for someone else [when it gets taken].” I imagine him here looking in the mirror and not recognizing the person he sees. “Now I think about it, yeah it’s pretty bad of me to do that,” he adds. “I’m not a horrible person, but clearly I have ethical issues.

At this point in the conversation, I feel bad. And after talking to Art Markman, a professor of psychology and marketing at the University of Texas at Austin, I know why: I may never have stolen a lunch from a co-worker, but I am no better than Rob. I’m simply bad in a different way.

It appears to be a simple breakdown of the Golden Rule. Lunch thieves do not seem to imagine themselves in the place of the victim. Read how Heaney learned about lunch theft and other everyday transgressions at The Cut. -via Nag on the Lake

(Image credit: Flickr user Joe Loong)

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Any workplace with several people in the same place will eventually confront a lunch theft. The victim will be upset, not only because they have no lunch, but also because they feel violated, and suddenly they cannot trust the people they spend do much time with. Katie Heaney's lunch was stolen. She was angry, of course, but she also offered amnesty if as he could talk to the perpetrator and find out what went on in their mind to cause the theft. The lunch thief was not found, so she went online to find someone who had stolen co-worker's food and talk to them about it. She wanted to know what made a lunch thief different from the rest of us.    

Before I called Rob, I expected — hoped, really — that our conversation would reveal something sinister about his personality, perhaps something tellingly psychopathic. But Rob seems like a nice guy. He expresses remorse for his actions, sounding genuinely devastated when I ask him to imagine his victims gazing sadly into the refrigerator. “People get hurt, I guess,” he says. “Knowing you have that soda there in the fridge at 3 or 4 in the afternoon when you really need it … that’s gotta suck for someone else [when it gets taken].” I imagine him here looking in the mirror and not recognizing the person he sees. “Now I think about it, yeah it’s pretty bad of me to do that,” he adds. “I’m not a horrible person, but clearly I have ethical issues.

At this point in the conversation, I feel bad. And after talking to Art Markman, a professor of psychology and marketing at the University of Texas at Austin, I know why: I may never have stolen a lunch from a co-worker, but I am no better than Rob. I’m simply bad in a different way.

It appears to be a simple breakdown of the Golden Rule. Lunch thieves do not seem to imagine themselves in the place of the victim. Read how Heaney learned about lunch theft and other everyday transgressions at The Cut. -via Nag on the Lake

(Image credit: Flickr user Joe Loong)

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<![CDATA[The Turkey Microwave Challenge]]>

Parents aren’t a fan of my cooking pic.twitter.com/DP2yDHfwbB

— Tim O'Shea III (@oshea_iii) November 16, 2018

This year's viral Thanksgiving prank is to text your parents and ask them how to microwave a 25-pound turkey. The responses are wonderfully funny. But is it really a prank when your parents "fall for it"? That only tells you that your folks consider it plausible that you're that clueless about cooking. One of the more common responses is "Are you high?"  

You can see a lot of responses at Twitter. Some of the humor comes from the very idea that anyone would have a microwave that could accommodate a 25-pound turkey. However, Butterball has instructions for microwaving a turkey, so it is possible. Just don't expect it to be good. Read those instructions, and some more challenge responses, at Patch. If you are outside the US, go here. -via Metafilter

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Parents aren’t a fan of my cooking pic.twitter.com/DP2yDHfwbB

— Tim O'Shea III (@oshea_iii) November 16, 2018

This year's viral Thanksgiving prank is to text your parents and ask them how to microwave a 25-pound turkey. The responses are wonderfully funny. But is it really a prank when your parents "fall for it"? That only tells you that your folks consider it plausible that you're that clueless about cooking. One of the more common responses is "Are you high?"  

You can see a lot of responses at Twitter. Some of the humor comes from the very idea that anyone would have a microwave that could accommodate a 25-pound turkey. However, Butterball has instructions for microwaving a turkey, so it is possible. Just don't expect it to be good. Read those instructions, and some more challenge responses, at Patch. If you are outside the US, go here. -via Metafilter

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<![CDATA[Not <i>That</i> John Lewis]]>

Sorry about the cake selection. I'm watching my figure. @jlandpartnershttps://t.co/c45vlQpz0m

— John Lewis (@johnlewis) October 28, 2018

The British department store John Lewis gets a lot of attention around Christmas, even on Twitter. But the Twitter handle @JohnLewis belongs to a man in Blacksburg, Virginia. Lewis gets a lot of Twitter replies and messages meant for the retailer, and he has become pretty clever with his responses, so much that he has become semi-Twitter famous in his own right. Twitter UK even reached out to use Lewis in their Christmas ad. That's an ad for Twitter, not for John Lewis.

Lewis has some behind-the-scenes stories about the video shoot at -where else- Twitter. -via Laughing Squid

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Sorry about the cake selection. I'm watching my figure. @jlandpartnershttps://t.co/c45vlQpz0m

— John Lewis (@johnlewis) October 28, 2018

The British department store John Lewis gets a lot of attention around Christmas, even on Twitter. But the Twitter handle @JohnLewis belongs to a man in Blacksburg, Virginia. Lewis gets a lot of Twitter replies and messages meant for the retailer, and he has become pretty clever with his responses, so much that he has become semi-Twitter famous in his own right. Twitter UK even reached out to use Lewis in their Christmas ad. That's an ad for Twitter, not for John Lewis.

Lewis has some behind-the-scenes stories about the video shoot at -where else- Twitter. -via Laughing Squid

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<![CDATA[6 Factors That Determine Whether or Not You Remember Your Dreams]]>

Do you wake up in the morning and immediately forget what you were dreaming about? The ability to recall dreams varies widely among people, and can vary over time for each person. There's a lot we don't know about dreams, or even sleep itself, but research into the difference between dream recallers and dream forgetters has unearthed a few factors that may determine the difference.  

4. AMOUNT OF SLEEP

The amount of sleep one gets on average is one of the most important factors related to dream recall. People dream every 90 minutes during the REM (rapid eye movement) sleep cycle. However, those REM periods get longer throughout the night, meaning that you’re doing the most dreaming toward the morning—generally right before you wake up. If you only sleep four hours instead of eight, you’re only getting about 20 percent of your dream time. For this reason, some people report remembering more of their dreams on the weekend, when they have the chance to catch up on sleep.

That explains my experience, as I haven't had eight uninterrupted hours of sleep in decades. There are five other differences that might determine whether you recall dreams or not at Mental Floss.

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Do you wake up in the morning and immediately forget what you were dreaming about? The ability to recall dreams varies widely among people, and can vary over time for each person. There's a lot we don't know about dreams, or even sleep itself, but research into the difference between dream recallers and dream forgetters has unearthed a few factors that may determine the difference.  

4. AMOUNT OF SLEEP

The amount of sleep one gets on average is one of the most important factors related to dream recall. People dream every 90 minutes during the REM (rapid eye movement) sleep cycle. However, those REM periods get longer throughout the night, meaning that you’re doing the most dreaming toward the morning—generally right before you wake up. If you only sleep four hours instead of eight, you’re only getting about 20 percent of your dream time. For this reason, some people report remembering more of their dreams on the weekend, when they have the chance to catch up on sleep.

That explains my experience, as I haven't had eight uninterrupted hours of sleep in decades. There are five other differences that might determine whether you recall dreams or not at Mental Floss.

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<![CDATA[The Dogs of War]]>

Dogs have been working in combat roles alongside American soldiers for more than 100 years. In fact, they have been alongside soldiers since antiquity. But only in 1942 were dogs officially inducted into the U.S. Army.

Dogs have played a central part in more recent actions in Iraq and Afghanistan where about 2,700 dogs were serving worldwide, according to the U.S. Defense Department. It was the largest deployment of canines in the world.

These “war dogs” are used on patrols, in drug and explosives detection, and on specialized missions, like the Navy SEAL raid that took down Osama bin Laden. They quickly learn and understand their role and bond with their handler and his unit such that they give new meaning to the term 'dogface'. These aren't just dogs; they are fellow soldiers. See an assortment of contemporary war dog photos here.

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Dogs have been working in combat roles alongside American soldiers for more than 100 years. In fact, they have been alongside soldiers since antiquity. But only in 1942 were dogs officially inducted into the U.S. Army.

Dogs have played a central part in more recent actions in Iraq and Afghanistan where about 2,700 dogs were serving worldwide, according to the U.S. Defense Department. It was the largest deployment of canines in the world.

These “war dogs” are used on patrols, in drug and explosives detection, and on specialized missions, like the Navy SEAL raid that took down Osama bin Laden. They quickly learn and understand their role and bond with their handler and his unit such that they give new meaning to the term 'dogface'. These aren't just dogs; they are fellow soldiers. See an assortment of contemporary war dog photos here.

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<![CDATA[Much Larger Dog Tries to Steal Small Dog, & Almost Succeeds]]>

This is amazing, & had to be shared. The hilarious clip was shared by Twitter user @chaeronaea, who said she came across on it on Reddit.

It shows a Golden Retriever grabbing the leash of a much smaller Pomeranian, and then trying to walk away with it. At first it looks like the Pomeranian is into it, at last before the poor little thing begins to get dragged a little as the owner desperately chases them both.

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This is amazing, & had to be shared. The hilarious clip was shared by Twitter user @chaeronaea, who said she came across on it on Reddit.

It shows a Golden Retriever grabbing the leash of a much smaller Pomeranian, and then trying to walk away with it. At first it looks like the Pomeranian is into it, at last before the poor little thing begins to get dragged a little as the owner desperately chases them both.

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<![CDATA[Behind the Scenes of Filming 1980's The Shining]]>

In 1980 movie goers got to see The Shining, Stanley Kubrick’s gripping take on Stephen King’s novel of madness in an isolated hotel in the Colorado Rockies off-season.

Kubrick went his own way, ignoring Stephen King's screenplay and suggestions. Whether or not he made the right decision is still a point of contention, but The Shining is one of the most frightening films of the 1980's, mainly because it featured Jack Nicholson in the role he was born to play.

Read about the making of this film and how Jack Nicholson got himself into character here.

In readiness for the full fly-on-the-wall feature, heeeeeere’s Jack getting pumped for the big scene:

Pre-CGI special effects.

The most iconic scene from The Shining.

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In 1980 movie goers got to see The Shining, Stanley Kubrick’s gripping take on Stephen King’s novel of madness in an isolated hotel in the Colorado Rockies off-season.

Kubrick went his own way, ignoring Stephen King's screenplay and suggestions. Whether or not he made the right decision is still a point of contention, but The Shining is one of the most frightening films of the 1980's, mainly because it featured Jack Nicholson in the role he was born to play.

Read about the making of this film and how Jack Nicholson got himself into character here.

In readiness for the full fly-on-the-wall feature, heeeeeere’s Jack getting pumped for the big scene:

Pre-CGI special effects.

The most iconic scene from The Shining.

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<![CDATA[Elephant Vs. Canadian Goose]]>

A ruckus recently occurred at the Hogle Zoo in Utah between a wild Canadian goose and a young elephant named Zuri, and the goose does not back down.

And as someone who regularly vacationed around Canadian geese, this does not surprise me at all. They are terrifying.

Via Boing Boing

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A ruckus recently occurred at the Hogle Zoo in Utah between a wild Canadian goose and a young elephant named Zuri, and the goose does not back down.

And as someone who regularly vacationed around Canadian geese, this does not surprise me at all. They are terrifying.

Via Boing Boing

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<![CDATA[Long-Lost Disney 'Oswald' Film Found in Japan after 70 Years]]>

Before Mickey and Mortimer were conceived, there was one other character that Disney had in the works and even had its first series. This guy's name was Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. But there were some intellectual property disputes that happened with Universal Studios over the character so Disney gave birth to Mickey.

However, what happened to Oswald? Recently, there have been some film of Oswald being found in different parts of the world. Learn more about how Oswald came to Japan. - via BBC

(Photo credit: Kobe Planet Film Archive)

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Before Mickey and Mortimer were conceived, there was one other character that Disney had in the works and even had its first series. This guy's name was Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. But there were some intellectual property disputes that happened with Universal Studios over the character so Disney gave birth to Mickey.

However, what happened to Oswald? Recently, there have been some film of Oswald being found in different parts of the world. Learn more about how Oswald came to Japan. - via BBC

(Photo credit: Kobe Planet Film Archive)

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<![CDATA[Dead Man Skinned to Preserve Tattoos]]>

When we die, we often want to leave some kind of legacy behind us or something that we can pass on to the next generation. For this Canadian tattoo artist, his passion was his legacy and he wanted his tattoos to outlive him.

Before his last days, Chris Wenzel had hoped his children would get to appreciate the work he has done:

"He fell in love with art and had such a passion for tattoos," his wife, Cheryl Wenzel, told the Canadian Press. "He would say he was a slave to the needle because he loved to tattoo so much."

Check out this article from The Guardian to know how Chris' dying wish was fulfilled.

(Photo credit: Chris Wenzel)

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When we die, we often want to leave some kind of legacy behind us or something that we can pass on to the next generation. For this Canadian tattoo artist, his passion was his legacy and he wanted his tattoos to outlive him.

Before his last days, Chris Wenzel had hoped his children would get to appreciate the work he has done:

"He fell in love with art and had such a passion for tattoos," his wife, Cheryl Wenzel, told the Canadian Press. "He would say he was a slave to the needle because he loved to tattoo so much."

Check out this article from The Guardian to know how Chris' dying wish was fulfilled.

(Photo credit: Chris Wenzel)

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<![CDATA[How I Killed the Best Burger Place in America]]>

Kevin Alexander once wrote an article for Thrillist ranking the top burgers in America. He named the restaurant Stanich’s in Portland, Oregon, as the home the best cheeseburger in America. That was last May. Stanich's was not ready for the fallout of the article or the video about the honor.

Apparently, after my story came out, crowds of people started coming in the restaurant, people in from out of town, or from the suburbs, basically just non-regulars. And as the lines started to build up, his employees -- who were mainly family members -- got stressed out, and the stress would cause them to not be as friendly as they should be, or to shout out crazy long wait times for burgers in an attempt to maybe convince people to leave, and as this started happening, things fell by the wayside. Dishes weren’t cleared quickly, and these new people weren’t having the proper Stanich’s experience, and Steve would spend his entire day going around apologizing and trying to fix things. They might pay him lip service to his face, but they were never coming back so they had no problem going on Yelp or Facebook and denouncing the restaurant and saying that the burgers were bad. And then the health department came in and suggested they do some deep cleaning (he still got a 97 rating, he told me), and the combination of all of these factors led Stanich to close down the restaurant for what he genuinely thought would be two weeks.

Stanich's has been closed since January. It's like that old tale about the fisherman who only worked until noon, although he could have started a great business by working all day. Why should he, when life is good already? But the story goes deeper than that, as Alexander uses the story of Stanich's restaurant to look at the power of the internet in setting trends that spin out of control in a hurry. -via Kottke

(Image credit: Emiliano Ponzi/Thrillist)

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Kevin Alexander once wrote an article for Thrillist ranking the top burgers in America. He named the restaurant Stanich’s in Portland, Oregon, as the home the best cheeseburger in America. That was last May. Stanich's was not ready for the fallout of the article or the video about the honor.

Apparently, after my story came out, crowds of people started coming in the restaurant, people in from out of town, or from the suburbs, basically just non-regulars. And as the lines started to build up, his employees -- who were mainly family members -- got stressed out, and the stress would cause them to not be as friendly as they should be, or to shout out crazy long wait times for burgers in an attempt to maybe convince people to leave, and as this started happening, things fell by the wayside. Dishes weren’t cleared quickly, and these new people weren’t having the proper Stanich’s experience, and Steve would spend his entire day going around apologizing and trying to fix things. They might pay him lip service to his face, but they were never coming back so they had no problem going on Yelp or Facebook and denouncing the restaurant and saying that the burgers were bad. And then the health department came in and suggested they do some deep cleaning (he still got a 97 rating, he told me), and the combination of all of these factors led Stanich to close down the restaurant for what he genuinely thought would be two weeks.

Stanich's has been closed since January. It's like that old tale about the fisherman who only worked until noon, although he could have started a great business by working all day. Why should he, when life is good already? But the story goes deeper than that, as Alexander uses the story of Stanich's restaurant to look at the power of the internet in setting trends that spin out of control in a hurry. -via Kottke

(Image credit: Emiliano Ponzi/Thrillist)

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<![CDATA[Originally, Tires Were White, So What Happened?]]>

Nobody really thinks about why certain things are the way they are, we mostly just accept them as we know them today. However, there is a little bit of history when it comes to car tires. Originally, they were off white in color and then they became bright white.

So how come are they black now? Read more about this article by David Tracy on Jalopnik.

(Photo credit: David Tracy)

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Nobody really thinks about why certain things are the way they are, we mostly just accept them as we know them today. However, there is a little bit of history when it comes to car tires. Originally, they were off white in color and then they became bright white.

So how come are they black now? Read more about this article by David Tracy on Jalopnik.

(Photo credit: David Tracy)

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<![CDATA[Stunning NASA Photo of Jupiter Sparks Twitter's Imagination]]>

This photo of Jupiter was taken on Oct. 29 by NASA's Juno Cam and was enhanced by two citizen scientists Gerald Eichstadt and Sean Doran. When NASA JPL posted it on Twitter, several people shared their thoughts on the incredibly awe-inspiring photo.

Noel Blaney (@LividLFC) wrote: "I saw a Squid," putting the photo side by side with an uncanny resemblance to the sea creature.

Another user, Paula (@cantwell14) said she saw the Virgin Mary with a diplodocus:

Other users also joined in the fun. Wonder of Science (@wonderofscience) pointed out its resemblance to Van Gogh's A Starry Night while others such as Astro Yuki (@AstroYuki) drew lines to show the image of a dragon breathing fire through its nostrils:

To see more photos of Jupiter, check out the Mission Juno website.

(Credits to: @NASAJPL, @LividLFC, @cantwell14, @wonderofscience, and @AstroYuki)

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This photo of Jupiter was taken on Oct. 29 by NASA's Juno Cam and was enhanced by two citizen scientists Gerald Eichstadt and Sean Doran. When NASA JPL posted it on Twitter, several people shared their thoughts on the incredibly awe-inspiring photo.

Noel Blaney (@LividLFC) wrote: "I saw a Squid," putting the photo side by side with an uncanny resemblance to the sea creature.

Another user, Paula (@cantwell14) said she saw the Virgin Mary with a diplodocus:

Other users also joined in the fun. Wonder of Science (@wonderofscience) pointed out its resemblance to Van Gogh's A Starry Night while others such as Astro Yuki (@AstroYuki) drew lines to show the image of a dragon breathing fire through its nostrils:

To see more photos of Jupiter, check out the Mission Juno website.

(Credits to: @NASAJPL, @LividLFC, @cantwell14, @wonderofscience, and @AstroYuki)

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<![CDATA[How Color Changes Our Taste Experience]]>

We all know why big brands in the food industry use a lot of certain colors in their logos like red and yellow because those colors stimulate our brain to think about delicious food which would in turn influence our actions.

But what happens when food which we have associated with a certain color would be changed into a different color? Would adding more of a certain color or reducing it really make food more or less delicious?

Tom Vanderbilt wrote this article on Nautilus explaining the science behind our perception of food based on their color:

"In a 1980 study, subjects were blindfolded and asked to tell whether the beverage they were drinking was flavored orange. Only one in five could. But when they were allowed to see what they were drinking, each of them identified the orange flavor. And when a lime-flavored drink was colored orange, nearly half of respondents thought it was flavored orange—none did when it was green."

(Photo courtesy of: Mathery Studio)

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We all know why big brands in the food industry use a lot of certain colors in their logos like red and yellow because those colors stimulate our brain to think about delicious food which would in turn influence our actions.

But what happens when food which we have associated with a certain color would be changed into a different color? Would adding more of a certain color or reducing it really make food more or less delicious?

Tom Vanderbilt wrote this article on Nautilus explaining the science behind our perception of food based on their color:

"In a 1980 study, subjects were blindfolded and asked to tell whether the beverage they were drinking was flavored orange. Only one in five could. But when they were allowed to see what they were drinking, each of them identified the orange flavor. And when a lime-flavored drink was colored orange, nearly half of respondents thought it was flavored orange—none did when it was green."

(Photo courtesy of: Mathery Studio)

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<![CDATA[This Super Hot Chemical Destroys Nerve Endings But It Can Help You]]>

If you think eating pepper is very agonizing to do especially if you have a low tolerance to hot, spicy things, you probably shouldn't go near this cactus-like plant. Its active ingredient is 10,000 times hotter than the world's hottest pepper.

However, what if this chemical has the property of blocking out your sense of pain? And it can do this without affecting other nerves in your system. So it effectively targets only the nerves that react to pain. That could make this chemical possibly one of the most potent painkillers which can be used in a variety of situations.

Learn more about it from The Wired.

(Photo courtesy of: Wikimedia Commons)

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If you think eating pepper is very agonizing to do especially if you have a low tolerance to hot, spicy things, you probably shouldn't go near this cactus-like plant. Its active ingredient is 10,000 times hotter than the world's hottest pepper.

However, what if this chemical has the property of blocking out your sense of pain? And it can do this without affecting other nerves in your system. So it effectively targets only the nerves that react to pain. That could make this chemical possibly one of the most potent painkillers which can be used in a variety of situations.

Learn more about it from The Wired.

(Photo courtesy of: Wikimedia Commons)

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<![CDATA[Running the gruelling Sahara Marathon - are you up to it?]]>

Marathon of the Sands, also known as Sahara Marathon - or as it is better known, Marathon des Sables, or MdS is a 6 day, 250 km (156 mi) ultramarathon (equating to the distance of six normal marathons). The first race started in 1986 after being initiated by French concert promoter Patrick Bauer. In 2009, the longest single stage was 91 km (57 mi) long. This race is held every year in the southern Moroccon section of the Sahara Desert. It is no surprise to note that Moroccan men won most of the races (Men's division) with Lahcen Ahansal winning from 1999 to 2007, his brother Mohammad winning from 2008 to 2010, then again in 2013 and Rachid El Morabity, winning in 2011 and then consecutively from 2013 to 2018. From 1986 to 1991 the race was dominated by French males and females.

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Marathon of the Sands, also known as Sahara Marathon - or as it is better known, Marathon des Sables, or MdS is a 6 day, 250 km (156 mi) ultramarathon (equating to the distance of six normal marathons). The first race started in 1986 after being initiated by French concert promoter Patrick Bauer. In 2009, the longest single stage was 91 km (57 mi) long. This race is held every year in the southern Moroccon section of the Sahara Desert. It is no surprise to note that Moroccan men won most of the races (Men's division) with Lahcen Ahansal winning from 1999 to 2007, his brother Mohammad winning from 2008 to 2010, then again in 2013 and Rachid El Morabity, winning in 2011 and then consecutively from 2013 to 2018. From 1986 to 1991 the race was dominated by French males and females.

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<![CDATA[Paarl Rock - second largest granite outcrop in the world]]>

Paarl Rock. This huge granite rock is formed by three rounded outcrops (also known as a batholiths) that make up Paarl Mountain, which is a granite mountain situated above the town of Paarl in the Western Cape, South Africa. It is the second largest granite outcrop in the world, with Yosemite, USA being the largest.

Granite is an igneous rock, that is, it formed (and still forms) below the surface of the earth by crystallisation of a molten rock, known as magma. The Paarl variety of granite belongs to a group classified as Cape Granite, known to have intruded into the crust of the earth between about 548 million years ago. Cape Granite is distributed from Saldanha Bay in the west to the town of George in the east.

Several separate granites make up Paarl Mountain - of which five varieties have been recognised. The most common variety is known as Bretagne Granite. Laborie Granite, which is mined at the De Hoop granite quarry (located on the southern slopes of Paarl Mountain). Bethel Dam Granite, that occurs only near the western shores of Bethel Dam. Montvue Granite, occurs mostly along the northeastern and northern parts of Paarl Mountain. The fifth granite type is simply known as "quartz porphyry".

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Paarl Rock. This huge granite rock is formed by three rounded outcrops (also known as a batholiths) that make up Paarl Mountain, which is a granite mountain situated above the town of Paarl in the Western Cape, South Africa. It is the second largest granite outcrop in the world, with Yosemite, USA being the largest.

Granite is an igneous rock, that is, it formed (and still forms) below the surface of the earth by crystallisation of a molten rock, known as magma. The Paarl variety of granite belongs to a group classified as Cape Granite, known to have intruded into the crust of the earth between about 548 million years ago. Cape Granite is distributed from Saldanha Bay in the west to the town of George in the east.

Several separate granites make up Paarl Mountain - of which five varieties have been recognised. The most common variety is known as Bretagne Granite. Laborie Granite, which is mined at the De Hoop granite quarry (located on the southern slopes of Paarl Mountain). Bethel Dam Granite, that occurs only near the western shores of Bethel Dam. Montvue Granite, occurs mostly along the northeastern and northern parts of Paarl Mountain. The fifth granite type is simply known as "quartz porphyry".

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<![CDATA[Once Upon A Deadpool]]>

Deadpool is back, and he's had his mouth washed out with soap. The movie Deadpool 2 has been cleaned up enough to get a PG-13 rating just in time for a Christmas re-release. Now, children between 13 and 16 (yeah, who are we kidding) have the chance to be introduced to Deadpool in Deadpool 2 while they are on Christmas break. The movie will be in theaters December 12. While this may seem like a quick cash grab for the holidays, it is also a long-term scheme to whet a child's appetite to see Deadpool and, of course, Deadpool 3 when it arrives. -via Geeks Are Sexy

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Deadpool is back, and he's had his mouth washed out with soap. The movie Deadpool 2 has been cleaned up enough to get a PG-13 rating just in time for a Christmas re-release. Now, children between 13 and 16 (yeah, who are we kidding) have the chance to be introduced to Deadpool in Deadpool 2 while they are on Christmas break. The movie will be in theaters December 12. While this may seem like a quick cash grab for the holidays, it is also a long-term scheme to whet a child's appetite to see Deadpool and, of course, Deadpool 3 when it arrives. -via Geeks Are Sexy

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<![CDATA[MerBy's Calendar]]>

If you are searching for an eye-catching, conversation-starting 2019 calendar, you would do well to check out MerBy's Calendar from the Newfoundland & Labrador Beard and Moustache Club. Each month features a gorgeous photograph of men in beards and mermaid tails. The calendar was first produced last year and raised over $300,000 for the club's local mental health organization. This year, the production values are higher, but proceeds will still go to a good cause.

Violence Prevention Newfoundland & Labrador will be the main recipient of the funds we raise this year. We wanted to help them continue their very important work of changing attitudes and breaking down stereotypes. Their goal is to challenge negative attitudes of masculinity, and empower men to become meaningfully engaged in violence prevention.

The MerBy's Calendar is one of several quirky 2019 calendars featured in a list at Boing Boing. 

(Image credit: NL Beard and Moustache Club)

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If you are searching for an eye-catching, conversation-starting 2019 calendar, you would do well to check out MerBy's Calendar from the Newfoundland & Labrador Beard and Moustache Club. Each month features a gorgeous photograph of men in beards and mermaid tails. The calendar was first produced last year and raised over $300,000 for the club's local mental health organization. This year, the production values are higher, but proceeds will still go to a good cause.

Violence Prevention Newfoundland & Labrador will be the main recipient of the funds we raise this year. We wanted to help them continue their very important work of changing attitudes and breaking down stereotypes. Their goal is to challenge negative attitudes of masculinity, and empower men to become meaningfully engaged in violence prevention.

The MerBy's Calendar is one of several quirky 2019 calendars featured in a list at Boing Boing. 

(Image credit: NL Beard and Moustache Club)

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<![CDATA[More Companies Are Chipping Their Workers Like Pets]]>

When we implant microchips into our pets, it's to find them if they become lost, because dogs and cats are unable to tell someone their address. Chipping humans, on the other hand, opens up an entirely different can of worms. Implanting an ID chip under an employee's skin is becoming more and more common among tech companies. The chips can control door locks, time logs, and even vending machine purchases. A worker will never forget her work ID, but neither can she go anywhere without it.  

Yet the first US company to inject workers with tracking chips was a Cincinnati surveillance firm in 2006, which required all employees working in its secure data center to have RFIDs implanted in their triceps. Coming from a spying company, it's almost like asking if you'd like your Orwell with a little Orwell on top. California in 2007 swiftly moved to block companies from being able to make RFID implants mandatory, as well as blocking the chipping of students in the state.

Don't get me wrong: becoming a cyborg sounds pretty awesome. It's a fairly popular pastime for DEF CON attendees who like their hackery edge-play to get a souvenir implant while at the conference. But those people are hackers, and they know what they're getting into. And I'm just that annoying person worried about normal people not knowing how they can get pwned, and who has a few irritating questions about personal security and privacy.

What could possibly go wrong? The indications are that chipped employees are fine with it, citing convenience, but that's a self-selected group that opted into those programs. Pets don't have to worry about data skimmers finding their employee IDs or direct deposit information, or stalkers finding their home address. Read about employee chip programs at Engadget. -via Digg 

(Image credit: Koren Shadmi)

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When we implant microchips into our pets, it's to find them if they become lost, because dogs and cats are unable to tell someone their address. Chipping humans, on the other hand, opens up an entirely different can of worms. Implanting an ID chip under an employee's skin is becoming more and more common among tech companies. The chips can control door locks, time logs, and even vending machine purchases. A worker will never forget her work ID, but neither can she go anywhere without it.  

Yet the first US company to inject workers with tracking chips was a Cincinnati surveillance firm in 2006, which required all employees working in its secure data center to have RFIDs implanted in their triceps. Coming from a spying company, it's almost like asking if you'd like your Orwell with a little Orwell on top. California in 2007 swiftly moved to block companies from being able to make RFID implants mandatory, as well as blocking the chipping of students in the state.

Don't get me wrong: becoming a cyborg sounds pretty awesome. It's a fairly popular pastime for DEF CON attendees who like their hackery edge-play to get a souvenir implant while at the conference. But those people are hackers, and they know what they're getting into. And I'm just that annoying person worried about normal people not knowing how they can get pwned, and who has a few irritating questions about personal security and privacy.

What could possibly go wrong? The indications are that chipped employees are fine with it, citing convenience, but that's a self-selected group that opted into those programs. Pets don't have to worry about data skimmers finding their employee IDs or direct deposit information, or stalkers finding their home address. Read about employee chip programs at Engadget. -via Digg 

(Image credit: Koren Shadmi)

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<![CDATA[Pika Mercury]]>

A pika is a lagomorph cousin of the rabbit, with shorter ears, not to be confused with a pooka or a pickachu. This particular pika has the voice of an opera singer and the ability to hold a crowd in the palm of his hand. -via reddit

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A pika is a lagomorph cousin of the rabbit, with shorter ears, not to be confused with a pooka or a pickachu. This particular pika has the voice of an opera singer and the ability to hold a crowd in the palm of his hand. -via reddit

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<![CDATA[Giving Thanks: Jefferson Airplane Guitarist Sheds the Rock-Star Mask to Tell His Truth]]>

Possibly the best way to get an unvarnished understanding of the rock 'n' roll hippie culture of the 1960s is from an insider, who's had decades to process and understand that era himself. Jorma Kaukonen, guitarist for Hot Tuna and Jefferson Airplane, offers that kind of retrospective in his new autobiography Been So Long: My Life and Music. Kaukonen's life has taken quite a few turns.    

Most rock stars have unlikely origin stories, and Kaukonen is no exception. To put his journey in context, consider the case of one of his contemporaries, Janis Joplin, about whom Kaukonen writes, “The first time I met Janis, I realized that I was in the presence of greatness.” No disrespect, but it’s a safe bet Joplin was not thinking the same thing about Kaukonen when they performed together in 1962, with Steve Talbott on harmonica, at the Folk Theater in San Jose, California. Five years before her breakthrough with Big Brother and the Holding Company, Joplin was already a full-time musician at age 19, the product of a troubled childhood in the oil-refinery town of Port Arthur, Texas. A budding drug habit would round out the dues she’d eventually pay to sing the blues.

In contrast, in 1962, Kaukonen was an indifferent student at a small, private, Jesuit university, still learning how to fingerpick, although he, too, was developing what would become an impressive drug habit, or several. Kaukonen’s parents, Jorma Sr. and Beatrice, were only a generation removed from Finland and Russia. Kaukonen himself grew up in Washington, D.C., the son of a diplomat whose career occasionally relocated the family to places like the Philippines and Pakistan, where servants waited on their every need. Kaukonen, in short, took the small stage at the Folk Theater as a bona-fide member of the privileged class, a self-described “Foreign Service brat”—the dues he’d pay would be entirely self-inflicted.

Read more about Kaukonen and his stories of San Francisco during the Summer of Love at Collectors Weekly.

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Possibly the best way to get an unvarnished understanding of the rock 'n' roll hippie culture of the 1960s is from an insider, who's had decades to process and understand that era himself. Jorma Kaukonen, guitarist for Hot Tuna and Jefferson Airplane, offers that kind of retrospective in his new autobiography Been So Long: My Life and Music. Kaukonen's life has taken quite a few turns.    

Most rock stars have unlikely origin stories, and Kaukonen is no exception. To put his journey in context, consider the case of one of his contemporaries, Janis Joplin, about whom Kaukonen writes, “The first time I met Janis, I realized that I was in the presence of greatness.” No disrespect, but it’s a safe bet Joplin was not thinking the same thing about Kaukonen when they performed together in 1962, with Steve Talbott on harmonica, at the Folk Theater in San Jose, California. Five years before her breakthrough with Big Brother and the Holding Company, Joplin was already a full-time musician at age 19, the product of a troubled childhood in the oil-refinery town of Port Arthur, Texas. A budding drug habit would round out the dues she’d eventually pay to sing the blues.

In contrast, in 1962, Kaukonen was an indifferent student at a small, private, Jesuit university, still learning how to fingerpick, although he, too, was developing what would become an impressive drug habit, or several. Kaukonen’s parents, Jorma Sr. and Beatrice, were only a generation removed from Finland and Russia. Kaukonen himself grew up in Washington, D.C., the son of a diplomat whose career occasionally relocated the family to places like the Philippines and Pakistan, where servants waited on their every need. Kaukonen, in short, took the small stage at the Folk Theater as a bona-fide member of the privileged class, a self-described “Foreign Service brat”—the dues he’d pay would be entirely self-inflicted.

Read more about Kaukonen and his stories of San Francisco during the Summer of Love at Collectors Weekly.

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<![CDATA[The Carnival Attraction That Saved Thousands of Premature Babies]]>

Martin Couney displayed his incubators for the first time - with live infants - at the Berlin Exposition in 1896. And in 1903 he settled in New York to run his babies-in-incubators summertime sideshow in Coney Island, a successful attraction that continued until the early 1940s.

At the time incubator use was not common among hospitals, and Couneys sideshow where visitors could view babies in the incubators for 25 cents, was often the only option to save a premature babies life - and at no cost to the parents. The admission fees covered all associated costs to care for the infants.

By one estimate, Couney's sideshow saved the lives of 6,500 infants under his care.

Read more on Atlas Obscura & The Smithsonian Magazine

Image Credit, Top to Bottom & Left to Right; NPR, Atlas Obscura

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Martin Couney displayed his incubators for the first time - with live infants - at the Berlin Exposition in 1896. And in 1903 he settled in New York to run his babies-in-incubators summertime sideshow in Coney Island, a successful attraction that continued until the early 1940s.

At the time incubator use was not common among hospitals, and Couneys sideshow where visitors could view babies in the incubators for 25 cents, was often the only option to save a premature babies life - and at no cost to the parents. The admission fees covered all associated costs to care for the infants.

By one estimate, Couney's sideshow saved the lives of 6,500 infants under his care.

Read more on Atlas Obscura & The Smithsonian Magazine

Image Credit, Top to Bottom & Left to Right; NPR, Atlas Obscura

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<![CDATA[Man Tries To Take Off Hoodie On Treadmill & Fails]]>

This not so bright man tried to take off his hoodie while running on a treadmill, and he failed hard. Via Boing Boing

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This not so bright man tried to take off his hoodie while running on a treadmill, and he failed hard. Via Boing Boing

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<![CDATA[Sleep Apnea CPAP Machine Hacker Saves Lives]]>

One Australian developer & hacker named Mark Watkins has made a difference in thousands of people's lives by hacking sleep apnea CPAP machines. His free, open-source, not FDA-approved software is the product of thousands of hours of hacking and development, and has helped thousands of sleep apnea patients take back control of their treatment from underinvested and overburdened physicians.

Modern CPAP machines create tons of data while being used - tracking things like average use per night, air pressure, leak rates, and other statistics tracking a patients quality of sleep. But according to SleepyHead users many Doctors only take a passing glance at this data before sending patients home. This software puts the power back into patients hands, and even lets them modify their own treatment.

Read more on Motherboard

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One Australian developer & hacker named Mark Watkins has made a difference in thousands of people's lives by hacking sleep apnea CPAP machines. His free, open-source, not FDA-approved software is the product of thousands of hours of hacking and development, and has helped thousands of sleep apnea patients take back control of their treatment from underinvested and overburdened physicians.

Modern CPAP machines create tons of data while being used - tracking things like average use per night, air pressure, leak rates, and other statistics tracking a patients quality of sleep. But according to SleepyHead users many Doctors only take a passing glance at this data before sending patients home. This software puts the power back into patients hands, and even lets them modify their own treatment.

Read more on Motherboard

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<![CDATA[The Bedazzled Pigeon]]>

Found: one pigeon, wearing a rhinestone vest. If this is your pigeon, contact Fallen Feathers in Phoenix, Arizona.

Jody Kieran, the owner of the Arizona-based bird rescue and rehabilitation center Fallen Feathers, tells Gizmodo that the male pigeon came into her care about last Sunday after someone in her community contacted her about a bird outside of their home with something odd on it. Kieran told the caller to catch the bird and bring it on over. When they showed up with “the pigeon wearing the thing,” Kieran said she wasn’t sure what to expect.

“I said, ‘Okay we’ve got to see this.’ I kind of rolled my eyes.” she says. “I open it up, and there he is, wearing a flight suit.”

Flight suits are used to capture bird poop while the bird is out of its cage. They’re basically bird diapers, but more stylish, as is evident by this pigeon’s rhinestone-adorned vest. And assuming it didn’t bedazzle its own flight suit, it’s clear it belonged to someone who probably cared about it.

A week later, no one has claimed the pigeon, which Kieran says has a great personality and loves Westerns. Read more about her new feathered fashionista friend at Gizmodo.

(Image credit: Fallen Feathers at Facebook)

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Found: one pigeon, wearing a rhinestone vest. If this is your pigeon, contact Fallen Feathers in Phoenix, Arizona.

Jody Kieran, the owner of the Arizona-based bird rescue and rehabilitation center Fallen Feathers, tells Gizmodo that the male pigeon came into her care about last Sunday after someone in her community contacted her about a bird outside of their home with something odd on it. Kieran told the caller to catch the bird and bring it on over. When they showed up with “the pigeon wearing the thing,” Kieran said she wasn’t sure what to expect.

“I said, ‘Okay we’ve got to see this.’ I kind of rolled my eyes.” she says. “I open it up, and there he is, wearing a flight suit.”

Flight suits are used to capture bird poop while the bird is out of its cage. They’re basically bird diapers, but more stylish, as is evident by this pigeon’s rhinestone-adorned vest. And assuming it didn’t bedazzle its own flight suit, it’s clear it belonged to someone who probably cared about it.

A week later, no one has claimed the pigeon, which Kieran says has a great personality and loves Westerns. Read more about her new feathered fashionista friend at Gizmodo.

(Image credit: Fallen Feathers at Facebook)

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<![CDATA[Shrek Retold]]>

Remember Star Wars Uncut, the crowdsourced remake where each contributor provided 15 seconds of footage to remake the original Star Wars movie? Now 3GI Industries presents a project somewhat like that, to remake the movie Shrek. Over 200 artists and Shrek fans contributed to the feature-length remake that will be debuted on the 3GI website on November 29th. For a taste of the insanity to come, here's the trailer for Shrek Retold. -via io9

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Remember Star Wars Uncut, the crowdsourced remake where each contributor provided 15 seconds of footage to remake the original Star Wars movie? Now 3GI Industries presents a project somewhat like that, to remake the movie Shrek. Over 200 artists and Shrek fans contributed to the feature-length remake that will be debuted on the 3GI website on November 29th. For a taste of the insanity to come, here's the trailer for Shrek Retold. -via io9

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<![CDATA[Life and Times of Whales Told Through Their Earwax]]>

Would it be an incredible feat to tell a person's life story just by looking at their earwax? Well, that's not possible for humans however, it is different for certain species of whales.

The ear is the window to a whale's soul. So much can be known about these whales just by looking at their earwax and in a new study, researchers used this to track whales' stress levels and how their bodies responded to all the changes happening in their marine ecosystem.

Over the course of a whale’s life, the waxy material is deposited in its ear canal, leaving a roughly foot-long structure that can be recovered after the animal’s death. Much like a tree’s rings, the layers in the wax can tell a story about the whale’s life. With a layer being deposited every six months, it’s possible to work out how old the whale is and get some clues about the experiences it faced throughout its history.

Read more about it at Ars Technica

(Image: Nature Communications)

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Would it be an incredible feat to tell a person's life story just by looking at their earwax? Well, that's not possible for humans however, it is different for certain species of whales.

The ear is the window to a whale's soul. So much can be known about these whales just by looking at their earwax and in a new study, researchers used this to track whales' stress levels and how their bodies responded to all the changes happening in their marine ecosystem.

Over the course of a whale’s life, the waxy material is deposited in its ear canal, leaving a roughly foot-long structure that can be recovered after the animal’s death. Much like a tree’s rings, the layers in the wax can tell a story about the whale’s life. With a layer being deposited every six months, it’s possible to work out how old the whale is and get some clues about the experiences it faced throughout its history.

Read more about it at Ars Technica

(Image: Nature Communications)

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