<![CDATA[Neatorama]]>https://www.neatorama.com/vosa/theme/neato2/media/logo.gifNeatoramahttps://www.neatorama.com/<![CDATA[Chocolate Ramen Exists]]>

Korakuen is a chain of ramen restaurants across Japan. Last year, the company offered customers bowls of chocolatey ramen noodles for Valentine's Day. It plans to do so again this year. In addition to traditional chocolate, it will also offer a white chocolate ramen, both of which are from the famous Lotte candy company. Sora News 24 reports that each bowl will cost about $6.20 and broth refills will cost $0.96.

Photo: PR Times

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Korakuen is a chain of ramen restaurants across Japan. Last year, the company offered customers bowls of chocolatey ramen noodles for Valentine's Day. It plans to do so again this year. In addition to traditional chocolate, it will also offer a white chocolate ramen, both of which are from the famous Lotte candy company. Sora News 24 reports that each bowl will cost about $6.20 and broth refills will cost $0.96.

Photo: PR Times

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<![CDATA[Listen to the Man with the Lowest Voice in the World Sing]]>

Tim Storms holds Guinness World Records for the lowest vocal note by a man and the greatest vocal range of a man. That's 10 octaves from G -7 to G/G#5!

His singing voice is unearthly beautiful. In this recording, he sings the Gospel classic "I've Got to Walk that Lonesome Road" by J.D. Summer.

This interview about Storms's work demonstrates how that low singing voice plays into conversation. Storms also does voiceover work, in which he offers renditions of Tony the Tiger, Tigger, Winnie the Pooh, and Darth Vader.

-via Twisted Sifter

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Tim Storms holds Guinness World Records for the lowest vocal note by a man and the greatest vocal range of a man. That's 10 octaves from G -7 to G/G#5!

His singing voice is unearthly beautiful. In this recording, he sings the Gospel classic "I've Got to Walk that Lonesome Road" by J.D. Summer.

This interview about Storms's work demonstrates how that low singing voice plays into conversation. Storms also does voiceover work, in which he offers renditions of Tony the Tiger, Tigger, Winnie the Pooh, and Darth Vader.

-via Twisted Sifter

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<![CDATA[Cat Dad Still Has Those Kittens]]>

Two and a half years ago, we posted the lovely story of a guy who found a cat and her four newborn kittens under his bed. British filmmaker Paris Zarcilla was astonished, and soon fell in love. He promised to protect them, and he's kept that promise by keeping all five cats. He named the mother Forever, and the kittens Pancake, Ronin, Mac, and Dobby. Zarcilla posts regular updates on the cats' antics at Twitter, and you can catch up on their story so far at Bored Panda.

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Two and a half years ago, we posted the lovely story of a guy who found a cat and her four newborn kittens under his bed. British filmmaker Paris Zarcilla was astonished, and soon fell in love. He promised to protect them, and he's kept that promise by keeping all five cats. He named the mother Forever, and the kittens Pancake, Ronin, Mac, and Dobby. Zarcilla posts regular updates on the cats' antics at Twitter, and you can catch up on their story so far at Bored Panda.

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<![CDATA[The Oddest Book Title of the Year]]>

Every year, one book wins the Diagram Prize for the oddest book title of the year. The year 2020 is the 42nd such competition, and a Canadian author has won for the first time. That would be anthropologist Gregory Forth of the University of Alberta.

A Dog Pissing at the Edge of a Path showed a remarkably clean pair of paws to the rest of the field, notching up 49% of the public vote—26 percentage points clear of second-place finisher, Introducing the Medieval Ass.   

Horace Bent, The Bookseller legendary diarist and The Diagram Prize administrator, said: “There has been little to shout about in a difficult year, but A Dog Pissing at the Edge of a Path is something to cherish, as long as you stay a good metre or two away and, perhaps, wear some stout wellies. Congratulations to Gregory Forth and McGill-Queen’s University Press: I am sure the champagne—or I guess something else—will certainly be flowing as they celebrate A Dog Pissing’s hard-earned victory."   

The book is about animal metaphors in Indonesia. Other titles in the shortlist were Classical Antiquity in Heavy Metal Music, Lawnmowers: An Illustrated History, The Slaughter of Farmed Animals: Practical Ways of Enhancing Animal Welfare, and How to Make Love to a Despot. Read more on the award at The Bookseller. -via Kottke

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Every year, one book wins the Diagram Prize for the oddest book title of the year. The year 2020 is the 42nd such competition, and a Canadian author has won for the first time. That would be anthropologist Gregory Forth of the University of Alberta.

A Dog Pissing at the Edge of a Path showed a remarkably clean pair of paws to the rest of the field, notching up 49% of the public vote—26 percentage points clear of second-place finisher, Introducing the Medieval Ass.   

Horace Bent, The Bookseller legendary diarist and The Diagram Prize administrator, said: “There has been little to shout about in a difficult year, but A Dog Pissing at the Edge of a Path is something to cherish, as long as you stay a good metre or two away and, perhaps, wear some stout wellies. Congratulations to Gregory Forth and McGill-Queen’s University Press: I am sure the champagne—or I guess something else—will certainly be flowing as they celebrate A Dog Pissing’s hard-earned victory."   

The book is about animal metaphors in Indonesia. Other titles in the shortlist were Classical Antiquity in Heavy Metal Music, Lawnmowers: An Illustrated History, The Slaughter of Farmed Animals: Practical Ways of Enhancing Animal Welfare, and How to Make Love to a Despot. Read more on the award at The Bookseller. -via Kottke

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<![CDATA[An Architectural Alphabet Book from 1773]]>

Johann David Steingruber (1702-1787) was an architect in what is now Germany. In 1773, he published this alphabet book which used letters as outlines for building shapes. Although some letters, such as T, turn into buildings very easily, others, such as P, R, and Z, look delightfully eccentric.

A more fanciful architectural alphabet from 1753 can be found here. Perhaps the two approaches could be combined into single buildings.

-via Kottke

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Johann David Steingruber (1702-1787) was an architect in what is now Germany. In 1773, he published this alphabet book which used letters as outlines for building shapes. Although some letters, such as T, turn into buildings very easily, others, such as P, R, and Z, look delightfully eccentric.

A more fanciful architectural alphabet from 1753 can be found here. Perhaps the two approaches could be combined into single buildings.

-via Kottke

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<![CDATA[The Endless Garbage Bag]]>

Meet the Longopac, a garbage bag that is able to extend its utility while cutting down waste. The bag, created by Swedish company Paxzo, is 410 feet in length. The ‘endless’ part comes from the fact that upon placing the Longopac into a garbage bin, you can fill it up however much you desire and cut it off at the top, tie it shut, and throw it out. Input Magazine has more details: 

"The bags are manufactured from three-ply polyethylene-low material consumption and [offer] high strength. Independent life cycle analysis shows less than 1/3 koldioxid compared to traditional bags. [The bags are also] lower weight and [their] more compact packing gives less transport cost."
If you ask us, it looks like a mix between a one-size-fits-any condom in bag form and Saran wrap, and we love it.
Paxxo calls their creation "endlessly clever" and while we can't vouch for that, it's definitely a creative spin on the average garbage-bag-and-can setup. Because though we try to only take out the trash when it's full... sometimes that's just not feasible. Sometimes we dispose of something foul or food scraps that can't be composted and will be foul soon enough, and we have to throw the bag out even if's only half full.

Image via Input Magazine 

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Meet the Longopac, a garbage bag that is able to extend its utility while cutting down waste. The bag, created by Swedish company Paxzo, is 410 feet in length. The ‘endless’ part comes from the fact that upon placing the Longopac into a garbage bin, you can fill it up however much you desire and cut it off at the top, tie it shut, and throw it out. Input Magazine has more details: 

"The bags are manufactured from three-ply polyethylene-low material consumption and [offer] high strength. Independent life cycle analysis shows less than 1/3 koldioxid compared to traditional bags. [The bags are also] lower weight and [their] more compact packing gives less transport cost."
If you ask us, it looks like a mix between a one-size-fits-any condom in bag form and Saran wrap, and we love it.
Paxxo calls their creation "endlessly clever" and while we can't vouch for that, it's definitely a creative spin on the average garbage-bag-and-can setup. Because though we try to only take out the trash when it's full... sometimes that's just not feasible. Sometimes we dispose of something foul or food scraps that can't be composted and will be foul soon enough, and we have to throw the bag out even if's only half full.

Image via Input Magazine 

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<![CDATA[Your iPhone Can Now Be A Universal TV Remote Control]]>

Alright, TV remote control apps are not a new thing for phones or tablets. However, the existing apps either don’t work well or have limited features. 9to5mac’sFilipe Espósito  tested the newly-updated “TV Remote”,  created by Adam Foot, the developer of the Shift Keyboard for Apple Watch. The application now supports the following brands: Hitachi, Toshiba, Sharp, LG and Samsung.

The first time you open it, the app identifies all the connected TVs in your Wi-Fi network for quick pairing. You just have to choose your TV from the list and then authorize the app to work as a remote control. If you want to add more than one TV for use with the TV Remote app, you can do so.
With just a few seconds, your TV will be paired with the app, and you can control it from your devices. There are navigation buttons to explore the interface and menus, volume and channel controls, as well as shortcuts to media playback, mute, and access the home screen. Tapping the three-dots button reveals even more options, such as subtitles, channel list, and sleep timer.
In my experience, the app works just as I expected. I have a Samsung QLED TV, and its official remote app is pretty bad as there’s a considerable delay between tapping the buttons on the iPhone and the TV responding to the commands. With the TV Remote app, everything works nearly instantly, and I don’t have to wait a few seconds until the app identifies my TV, which happens every time with the Samsung app for some unknown reason.

Image via 9to5mac 

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Alright, TV remote control apps are not a new thing for phones or tablets. However, the existing apps either don’t work well or have limited features. 9to5mac’sFilipe Espósito  tested the newly-updated “TV Remote”,  created by Adam Foot, the developer of the Shift Keyboard for Apple Watch. The application now supports the following brands: Hitachi, Toshiba, Sharp, LG and Samsung.

The first time you open it, the app identifies all the connected TVs in your Wi-Fi network for quick pairing. You just have to choose your TV from the list and then authorize the app to work as a remote control. If you want to add more than one TV for use with the TV Remote app, you can do so.
With just a few seconds, your TV will be paired with the app, and you can control it from your devices. There are navigation buttons to explore the interface and menus, volume and channel controls, as well as shortcuts to media playback, mute, and access the home screen. Tapping the three-dots button reveals even more options, such as subtitles, channel list, and sleep timer.
In my experience, the app works just as I expected. I have a Samsung QLED TV, and its official remote app is pretty bad as there’s a considerable delay between tapping the buttons on the iPhone and the TV responding to the commands. With the TV Remote app, everything works nearly instantly, and I don’t have to wait a few seconds until the app identifies my TV, which happens every time with the Samsung app for some unknown reason.

Image via 9to5mac 

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<![CDATA[This AI Recycles Better Than We Do!]]>

AMP Robotics has designed a three-handed robot that can sort 80 items of recycling per minute, which is twice as fast as human sorters! The  company hopes to use it to reduce the tedious and tiring labor of manually sorting tons of recycling. The robot uses computer vision and machine learning, as Inverse details: 

Ultimately, this technology could play a key role in closing the loop of recyclable manufacturing and creating a world free from waste (or, at least, recyclable waste.)
When it comes actually sorting these waste materials, AMP Robotics' technology has two main parts:
AMP Neuron — the machine's brain and eyes
AMP Cortex — the machine's body and hands
Using computer vision, the same kind of technology employed by self-driving cars to "see" the road, the AMP Neuron first "looks at" incoming recycling and using machine learning to quickly analyze what type of material it is and makes a decision on what it should do next — either call on its suction cup arm to scoop it up or let it move past.

Image via Inverse 

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AMP Robotics has designed a three-handed robot that can sort 80 items of recycling per minute, which is twice as fast as human sorters! The  company hopes to use it to reduce the tedious and tiring labor of manually sorting tons of recycling. The robot uses computer vision and machine learning, as Inverse details: 

Ultimately, this technology could play a key role in closing the loop of recyclable manufacturing and creating a world free from waste (or, at least, recyclable waste.)
When it comes actually sorting these waste materials, AMP Robotics' technology has two main parts:
AMP Neuron — the machine's brain and eyes
AMP Cortex — the machine's body and hands
Using computer vision, the same kind of technology employed by self-driving cars to "see" the road, the AMP Neuron first "looks at" incoming recycling and using machine learning to quickly analyze what type of material it is and makes a decision on what it should do next — either call on its suction cup arm to scoop it up or let it move past.

Image via Inverse 

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<![CDATA[Check Out This Cool Smart Furniture!]]>

Aesthetically-pleasing furniture is one way to amp up your home (and your Instagram account, for sure), but what about functionality? Some are now leaning towards furniture that is more focused on function and utility. While less abstract and visually-stunning, these furniture pieces are designed to provide comfort and efficiency in one’s home. YankoDesign focuses on Smart Furniture, a genre of tech-enhanced items that can make our lives easier. From smart work desks that run on food waste to smart beds that charge our devices and come along with an integrated home theatre system, these pieces are not something to overlook! Check the full piece here. 

Image via YankoDesign

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Aesthetically-pleasing furniture is one way to amp up your home (and your Instagram account, for sure), but what about functionality? Some are now leaning towards furniture that is more focused on function and utility. While less abstract and visually-stunning, these furniture pieces are designed to provide comfort and efficiency in one’s home. YankoDesign focuses on Smart Furniture, a genre of tech-enhanced items that can make our lives easier. From smart work desks that run on food waste to smart beds that charge our devices and come along with an integrated home theatre system, these pieces are not something to overlook! Check the full piece here. 

Image via YankoDesign

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<![CDATA[A Dreamy Retreat Lies In Japan’s Hokkaido Mountains]]>

Yezo is a small yet spectacular property in the Northern Hokkaido Mountains of Japan. The retreat, designed by Japanese architecture studio Laboratory for Explorative Architecture & Design (LEAD), combines experimental design with natural inspiration - and the result is a wonderful treat for the eyes, indeed (and I only saw the photos, imagine seeing that in real life!), as LuxuryLaunches details: 

Built using wood, stone, water, and light in major proportions, the Yezo Retreat is an ideal place for those craving solaces in the lap of nature. It features floor-to-ceiling windows and one large area complete with a bed, seating space, fireplace, and a staircase in place of separate bedrooms.
The resort’s highlight is the roof, where there is a sundeck of sorts, complete with two chairs. With elements such as a central concrete chimney and a curved roof (shell structure made using glue-laminated -GluLam wooden beams suspended from a central concrete chimney and covered with locally sourced black slate), the Yezo retreat has also managed to win the 2020 Golden Needle Design Award.

Image via LuxuryLaunches

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Yezo is a small yet spectacular property in the Northern Hokkaido Mountains of Japan. The retreat, designed by Japanese architecture studio Laboratory for Explorative Architecture & Design (LEAD), combines experimental design with natural inspiration - and the result is a wonderful treat for the eyes, indeed (and I only saw the photos, imagine seeing that in real life!), as LuxuryLaunches details: 

Built using wood, stone, water, and light in major proportions, the Yezo Retreat is an ideal place for those craving solaces in the lap of nature. It features floor-to-ceiling windows and one large area complete with a bed, seating space, fireplace, and a staircase in place of separate bedrooms.
The resort’s highlight is the roof, where there is a sundeck of sorts, complete with two chairs. With elements such as a central concrete chimney and a curved roof (shell structure made using glue-laminated -GluLam wooden beams suspended from a central concrete chimney and covered with locally sourced black slate), the Yezo retreat has also managed to win the 2020 Golden Needle Design Award.

Image via LuxuryLaunches

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<![CDATA[334 Punches in 1 Minute]]>

That's 5.56 full extension punches every second.

Russian boxer and biological punching machine Pavel Trusov secured a Guinness World Record at a gym in Slovakia last year in this amazing display.

I notice that for the first half of the event, he appears to be breathing entirely through his nose. I wonder why. Would mouth breathing be slower even though it would take in more air?

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That's 5.56 full extension punches every second.

Russian boxer and biological punching machine Pavel Trusov secured a Guinness World Record at a gym in Slovakia last year in this amazing display.

I notice that for the first half of the event, he appears to be breathing entirely through his nose. I wonder why. Would mouth breathing be slower even though it would take in more air?

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<![CDATA[Hungry Cat Bed]]>

Twitter user Towler's cat uses a clamshell bed. To make it more amusing and ominous, he added eyes so that it consumes its feline prey. What was hidden in the mouth of this bed that so cunningly lured in the cat?

-via Richard Eisenbeis

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Twitter user Towler's cat uses a clamshell bed. To make it more amusing and ominous, he added eyes so that it consumes its feline prey. What was hidden in the mouth of this bed that so cunningly lured in the cat?

-via Richard Eisenbeis

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<![CDATA[Grenade End Tables]]>

It's a classy and elegant look that shows your houseguests or new romantic partners what they're getting into. Etsy seller Jack Lebond of Austin makes these 18 and 24 inch tall tables out of plywood. They're unfinished, so you can paint them however you like. I suggest bright pastels for the children's bedrooms.

-via The Awesomer

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It's a classy and elegant look that shows your houseguests or new romantic partners what they're getting into. Etsy seller Jack Lebond of Austin makes these 18 and 24 inch tall tables out of plywood. They're unfinished, so you can paint them however you like. I suggest bright pastels for the children's bedrooms.

-via The Awesomer

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<![CDATA[The Art of Whaling, from Those Who Were There]]>

The deep-sea whalers of Nantucket were hard-working men on a difficult job, but there was plenty of time between whale sightings to fill with activities that survive to this day. Those were keeping logs of the voyage, scrimshaw, drawing, and painting. The most common subjects of these works are, of course, ships and whales. The art those whalers left behind gives us a glimpse into the adventures they experienced as well as the boring days in between.

As with shore whaling, the key was to draw close to the great mammal before striking it with a harpoon attached to a long coil of rope. Once the harpoon’s iron was firmly lodged into the creature’s flesh, then it would either promptly die or, more commonly, flee, in which case a “Nantucket sleigh ride” would ensue. During this chase the frenzied whale would bolt with the boats in tow, until eventually, exhausted, the leviathan would collapse and be pierced to a gruesome death.

The cruelty of the hunt is not something that generally comes across in the logbook and journal depictions, where the blood and gore are replaced by anthropomorphised whales complete with unfathomably merry faces. Perhaps the brutality of whaling was difficult to reconcile with the principles of pacifism and non-violence that supposedly underpinned the Nantucketers’ Quaker way of life.

The "Nantucket sleigh ride" depicted above obviously has a little fantasy added, but that makes for more interesting art. See more of this, plus smiling whales and detailed ships in art at the Public Domain Review. -via Atlas Obscura

(Image credit: Log of the ship Susan)

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The deep-sea whalers of Nantucket were hard-working men on a difficult job, but there was plenty of time between whale sightings to fill with activities that survive to this day. Those were keeping logs of the voyage, scrimshaw, drawing, and painting. The most common subjects of these works are, of course, ships and whales. The art those whalers left behind gives us a glimpse into the adventures they experienced as well as the boring days in between.

As with shore whaling, the key was to draw close to the great mammal before striking it with a harpoon attached to a long coil of rope. Once the harpoon’s iron was firmly lodged into the creature’s flesh, then it would either promptly die or, more commonly, flee, in which case a “Nantucket sleigh ride” would ensue. During this chase the frenzied whale would bolt with the boats in tow, until eventually, exhausted, the leviathan would collapse and be pierced to a gruesome death.

The cruelty of the hunt is not something that generally comes across in the logbook and journal depictions, where the blood and gore are replaced by anthropomorphised whales complete with unfathomably merry faces. Perhaps the brutality of whaling was difficult to reconcile with the principles of pacifism and non-violence that supposedly underpinned the Nantucketers’ Quaker way of life.

The "Nantucket sleigh ride" depicted above obviously has a little fantasy added, but that makes for more interesting art. See more of this, plus smiling whales and detailed ships in art at the Public Domain Review. -via Atlas Obscura

(Image credit: Log of the ship Susan)

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<![CDATA[Man Snuffs Out Candle with Throwing Knife from 23 Feet Away]]>

Do you need to put our a candle flame? Throw a knife at it. That's what this master thrower does. I suspect he's equally skilled at flipping light switches, changing diapers, or creating pivot tables in Excel from 23 feet away. Just give him a well-balanced knife.

-via Born in Space

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Do you need to put our a candle flame? Throw a knife at it. That's what this master thrower does. I suspect he's equally skilled at flipping light switches, changing diapers, or creating pivot tables in Excel from 23 feet away. Just give him a well-balanced knife.

-via Born in Space

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