Miss Cellania's Blog Posts

The Cat That Had 62 Kittens

The steamship Iron Monarch had a ship's cat whose name was not recorded, but her feats of reproduction were. While the crew might have just called her "Pussy," they held the cat in high regard. In October of 1925, the ship was carrying a load of coal and facing gale force winds and crashing waves during a storm. The crew was busy holding things together.

And then through the spume that made its way from length to breadth of the ship, biting and lashing the faces of those who were “only doing their duty,” there was heard a thin, small voice, which asked in beseeching tones, “Oh, where is our poor old cat?”

And over the face of each seaman – men inured to hardship and rough life; mariners who have voyaged the seven seas of the world – came a pallor only associated with death or with some great mental upheaval. As one man, they rushed through the seething waters to all parts of the ship, jeopardizing their own lives (even, the cook left his galley) in the search for pussy.

They eventually found her, with nine new kittens born during the storm. That brought her lifetime record up to 62 kittens. If you got a smile out of that story, you'll want to read more tales of ship's cats at Seafurrers. -via Strange Company

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

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How Hostess Cakes Are Made

(YouTube link)

Come close and watch robots in Emporia, Kansas, make Hostess cupcakes, donettes, and Twinkies! No, we're not going to get any recipes, but we will see battalions of cakes marching in formation through the factory as layer after layer of sweet sugary stuff is added to them. Cream filling? Check. Frosting? Check. Swirls? Check. Powdered sugar? Check. You might get a sugar high just by watching, but my guess is that you'll go find a sweet snack right after the video is finished. -via Geekologie  

We dish up more neat food posts at the Neatolicious blog

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Unearthing Hollywood Treasure in an Arctic Ghost Town

Dawson City in Yukon, Canada, became a hub of the gold rush in a hurry. Founded in 1896 just 350 miles below the Arctic Circle, the town's population grew to 40,000 people in just two years. That boom only lasted as a long as the gold rush, and then the Yukon capital leveled off to 8,000 inhabitants. But during its peak, Dawson City was the base where prospectors and miners (and the vendors who supported the industry) gathered for supplies, mail, and entertainment.

In its heyday, Dawson had been the final stop for a distribution chain that sent films and newsreels to the Yukon, receiving the best the movie industry had to offer. In fact, it was a bit of a hot-spot for certain Hollywood elite. Sid Grauman (of Grauman’s Chinese Theater) lived there for a while, as did director William Desmond Taylor who made over 59 silent films, including Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. When it came to sending back the film reels to Hollywood, it wasn’t exactly a priority for the town and by the 1920s, over 500,000 feet of film had accumulated in the basement of the local library.

This repository was forgotten for the next 50 years, and was only discovered in 1978. Read about Dawson City and its place in cinema history at Messy Nessy Chic.


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A Trip Through New York City in 1911

Once you get over how strangely natural this glimpse of New York City from 100 years ago is, you start to notice how differently public space was used at the time. This was before roads were designated for cars, and were used by pedestrians, horses, and vendors as well as motorized vehicles. You might notice several elderly men with missing limbs, then you realize this is only 50 years after the start of the Civil War.

(YouTube link)

The Swedish company Svenska Biografteatern shot the original footage in 1911. Guy Jones adjusted the film speed to make it appear more natural, and added sound effects. -via Metafilter


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Monsieur Bébé: The Brief, Strange Life of Raymond Radiguet

The year 1923 was a momentous year for a young French writer named Raymond Radiguet. Radiguet began the year by publishing his first novel. He was also involved with a publicity campaign that focused on the author's age and changed the way books were marketed. In the spring of 1923, Radiguet had been catapulted into the rarified artistic circle that included Coco Chanel and Picasso. He and Jean Cocteau were invited to a series of seances hosted by married artists Jean and Valentine Hugo.  

In a pink velvet-lined anteroom, the Hugos and their friends, including the artistic polymath Jean Cocteau and the avant-garde composer Georges Auric, encircled a wooden pedestal with a tripod base and tilting round top, a type of table reputed to encourage spiritual communion. Placing their hands on its surface, which was lacquered black and painted with flowers, they asked questions. The table tapped out answers on the floor (one tap meaning the letter a, and so on), which Jean Hugo wrote down. Over the course of these sittings, the clearest messages were intended for the youngest guest: the nineteen-year-old Raymond Radiguet, Cocteau’s protégé and lover, who had just published his scandalous debut novel, Le Diable au corps (The Devil in the Flesh). “Uneasiness will grow with genius,” claimed the “spirit.” Radiguet, the spirit said, “should love me for he loves nothing.” It warned: “Fame does not replace love even in death and I am death.” The following week came death’s final declaration: “I want his youth.”

While we aren't told who produced the messages of warning, it turned out to be an omen. Before the year was out, Radiguet was dead at the age of twenty. The things he said and did in the days leading up to his demise clearly indicated he knew death was imminent, even as those around him expected him to recover from illness. Read about the short but intense life of Raymond Radiguet at The Paris Review. -via Strange Company


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The Green-Haired Turtle that Breathes Through Its Genitals

The most striking thing about the appearance of the Mary River turtle is its habit of hosting growths of algae on its body, like the green mohawk and whiskers of this turtle photographed by Chris Van Wyk. But notice also the fingers coming from its chin. We first introduced you to the Mary river turtle ten years ago, but this strange creature is back in the news because it has been put on an endangered species list.

The 40cm long turtle, which is only found on the Mary river in Queensland, features in a new list of the most vulnerable reptile species compiled by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL).

Despite the turtle’s punk appearance – derived from vertical strands of algae that also grow on its body – its docile nature made it historically popular as a pet.

Gill-like organs within its cloaca – an orifice used by reptiles for excretion and mating – enable it to stay underwater for up to three days, but it was unable to hide from the pet collectors who raided its nests during the 1960s and 1970s.

Strange how we pay attention to animal species mainly when we're about to lose them. Read more about the Mary river turtle at The Guardian. -via Dave Barry


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How To Get Out of a Speeding Ticket

(YouTube link)

Think fast, but be ready to follow through. In this case, following through meant dedication to defeating an opponent who won't back down, no matter what. The joke should have been a short one, but it wouldn't have been quite as funny. Funny or Die took the next step, and the next, and the next.  -via reddit


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Why Are Bananas, Nuts, and Crackers the Only Foods That Say ‘Crazy’?

The English language has a multitude of terms for insanity, although few of them are diagnostic terms for mental illness. Slang terms for "crazy" are used when a person has lost control or just doesn't make sense to those around him. These terms aren't confined to people, since a wild party or an unconventional building or a nonsensical movie can all be "bananas." But bananas, crackers, and nuts are the only food terms that came to mean crazy. Let's learn how that happened.  

The Routledge Dictionary of Modern American Slang and Unconventional English traces the idea of bananas relating to craziness only back to the late 1910s; The Concise New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English roughly agrees, with its own etymology going back to 1924. These sources claim that the crazy banana meaning comes from the phrase “banana oil,” which, in flapper slang, meant “nonsense.”

Typically, the substance referred to as banana oil is amyl acetate, which is, insanely, used as both a paint solvent and as a flavoring. (It smells strongly, but not precisely, of bananas, which is partly why banana-flavored candies are distinct but not really banana-flavored.) Why did flappers like to use the phrase “banana oil” to mean “nonsense”? Possibly it’s related to “snake oil,” but I suspect it’s also because the word “banana,” coming from a language that has not given English very many words, sounds unusual to the ears of English speakers.

"Banana oil" fell out of use, but came back later, oil free. And what about nuts and crackers? Both terms mean things other than food, which makes their evolution into slang all the more difficult to trace. You can read the history of the food terms used for craziness at Atlas Obscura.


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The North-Going Cat and the South-Going Cat

(YouTube link)

Two young cats made their way across a door frame in Russia in opposite directions, so they of course ran into each other. There's no room to turn around, so what can they do? Oh yeah, they could just jump to the floor, but that would be admitting defeat. The goats that got stuck on a ledge the other day could learn a thing or two from these kittens. -via Boing Boing

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

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The Best of Nathan Pyle

Nathan Pyle has given us some great comics over the years. Today, he posted a gallery of the "58 funniest drawings I have drawn as a drawer." It wasn't easy to select just a few from the 58 comics, so you'll want to go see the rest of them.

You can follow Pyle's work at Facebook and on Instagram.




-via reddit


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Welcome Home

The trick to playing an airport arrival prank is to be subtle enough for plausibility. Redditor ron1337 felt the need to explain that his family doesn't normally dress like this. Yet if any of these people were seen individually, one would assume that's their everyday appearance. Commenters who are familiar with Edmonton assured us that they wouldn't stand out all that much. One would also assume that the sign remained folded until the plane disembarked. His daughter Cindy had only been gone for three months, and found her welcome quite humorous. She's the one holding the dog.


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Jeff Goldblum Making Noises

(YouTube link)

Jeff Goldblum has a particular talent for making the characters he portrays sound like real people. Scripts don't often contain stammers, fillers, or wordless vocal responses, but real life communication is full of them. While these strange vocalizations are perfectly normal in their place, and do a lot to lend credence to a character, they are hilarious compiled together with no context. -via Geeks Are Sexy


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The Secret Language of Ships

Unless you live near a commercial harbor or work in the industry, you might not know the ins and outs of the shipping business. And that's most of us. But tugboat operators see giant container ships up close and personal. They not only know how to haul those big ships around, they know how to read their secret language.

Tugboat crews routinely encounter what few of us will ever see. They easily read a vessel’s size, shape, function, and features, while deciphering at a glance the mysterious numbers, letters, and symbols on a ship’s hull. To non-mariners, the markings look like hieroglyphs. For those in the know, they speak volumes about a particular ship and also about the shipping industry.

The numbers, marks, and even the color scheme of a ship can tell strangers the ship's size, depth, underwater shape, origin, and how much of its capacity is loaded. There are special marks to help tugboat operators, maintenance crews, and inspectors do their work. If you've ever wondered what all that stuff on the outside of a ship means, you'll find an explanation at Hakai magazine. -via TYWKIWDBI

(Image credit: David Webster Smith)


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Garry Frank's Weather Rant

(YouTube link)

Don't blame the weatherman for the weather. Garry Frank is the meteorologist at WXMI in Grand Rapids, Michigan. That's a thankless job, as Michigan can be pretty cold. On Tuesday, he'd had enough of it. Hey, he only reports the weather forecast, he doesn't cause it. If you shoot the messenger over bad weather, you'll end up with no forecast at all. The real kicker is that Tuesday's forecast was for somewhat warmer temperatures and his co-workers still complained!  -via Digg


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Who Will Die in The Walking Dead Season Eight Finale?

The producers of The Walking Dead have been building up to this Sunday's episode for about three years now, and fans have become fatigued with the "all out war" between Rick's group, with their allies from various communities, and the Saviors under the leadership of Negan. This conflict should have been wrapped up a year ago. We've been told it will conclude this weekend. Season nine is going to be very different, which is promising. But first we have to have a final battle, and someone, maybe a lot of people, are going to die. Continue reading for the prospects of each character, which contain spoilers for those not current in the series.

Who will die this week on The Walking Dead?


























Continue reading

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The Weird, Wacky Wonderworld Of Communist-Era Hotels

Eastern Europe did not have as many hotels under Communist rule as they do today, but back then the hotels were huge, grand in their brutalist way, and dominated the market. The government owned them, so they simplified tourism by putting everyone into one building. That made it easier to serve travelers and tourists ...and easier to keep an eye on them. Each nation had an agency that oversaw all hotels.

It’s not immediately obvious why the party and state-security apparatus would take such a keen interest in running hotels, until you consider the fact that these places were tremendous moneymakers for the regimes.

They could charge for the rooms and meals in hard currencies (mainly, at the time, U.S. dollars or German marks) and had a captive clientele of relatively well-off foreigners to whom they could market their off-the-books services like prostitution and money changing.

There was simply too much cash floating around to pass up.​

Many of these hotels remain decades later. Even though they've been remodeled after the fall of Communism, they still retain their Soviet-era creepiness, which is particularly obvious to those who recall those days. See a roundup of such hotels at Radio Free Europe. -via Metafilter

(Image credit: Mark Baker)


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Lego Rumba

It's a great deal of trouble to get your kids to pick up their LEGO blocks that end up all over the floor. It would be easier to just do it yourself, but the one who left them in the floor should do it. However, if your kid is a talented engineer like YouTuber The Brick Wall, he or she will invent a machine to do it. The Lego Rumba is a machine that picks up LEGO pieces, itself made of LEGO pieces. My guess is that "Rumba" is pronounced like the vacuum instead of the dance. Watch it in action.

(YouTube link)

To be honest, this is an automated broom and dustpan. But for kids who need to pick up their toys, it's a lot more fun. -via Geeks Are Sexy


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The Murder that Shook Iceland

Iceland has 340,000 people and averages only 1.6 murders a year. Most of those are young men killed by someone who knew them, as in fights. Iceland's most famous murder case took place in 1828, but a 2017 case may eclipse it. On January 13, Birna Brjánsdóttir disappeared while walking home from a night out on the town in Reykjavík. The investigation into Brjánsdóttir's disappearance involved the police and the citizens of Reykjavík, who spread the word through social media and pitched in to find the young woman, or evidence of her fate.

On the morning of Saturday 21 January, a week after she vanished, the biggest search operation in Iceland’s history began. Ice-Sar alone deployed 835 volunteers and 87 vehicles, an extraordinary response in a small country. Across the island, people waited anxiously for updates.

“Today she is our sister, our daughter – that became the mantra,” said Guðbrandur Örn Arnarson, Ice-Sar’s project manager. “We don’t live in a society where we tolerate a 20-year-old woman being abducted in the night.”

Clues led to an international fishing trawler, a rental car spattered with blood, and almost $2 million worth of hashish. Read the entire story as it unfolded at The Guardian.

(Image credit: Reykjavik Metropolitan Police)


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The Hopscotch Experiment

The folks from The Cut drew a colorful hopscotch board on a sidewalk in Seattle, just to see how many people would use it. They recorded video for ten hours and counted the people who walked by. To be honest, only a small percentage of people tried it, but thankfully, this video is mostly edited to show those who did.

(YouTube link)

And they are worth watching. The simple game brought a smile to a lot of faces. -via Tastefully Offensive


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How a Typo Helped End World War II

Geoffrey Tandy was a highly-regarded marine biologist at the Natural History Museum in 1939, when he volunteered for the Royal Navy Reserves. The powers-that-be saw Tandy's information and immediately summoned him to Bletchley Park for a secret mission, cracking Axis codes.

Once the mistake was revealed, they couldn't just dismiss Tandy from the secret project, but what could he do? So Tandy remained attached to Bletchley Park, and two years later, became the hero of the secret cryptography department when his exact expertise was needed. Comedian Florence Schechter tells the entire story in a thread at Twitter, with illustrations. Even if you hate reading Twitter threads, this one is well worth the effort, and she has a list of sources at the end in case you want to read more about Tandy and his adventures during the war. -via Mental Floss


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How to Make an International Standard Cup of Tea

A global industry exists to set standards for everything, from the kilogram to keeping time. There's even a set international standard set for making tea. People will argue their entire lives about the best way to make a cup of tea, but few have ever made an International Standard cup of tea, and Tom Scott explains why.  

(YouTube link)

I make tea all afternoon and evening when the morning coffee pot runs out, so I take all the shortcuts: teabags and a microwave. That's because tea isn't a social occasion or a treat for me -it's what I drink. The standard for most Americans was posted at reddit.



Your mileage may vary. -via Geeks Are Sexy


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7 Times Google Maps Straight Up Ruined People's Lives

The ability to use GPS, or SatNav if you're British, is a modern convenience that boggles the mind for those of us who managed to travel without it for years. However, there's still value in learning to navigate the old-fashioned way, with hard copy maps, a trained sense of direction, and the willingness to ask for directions. Those skills might lead you to a nagging suspicion that Google Maps isn't leading you in the right direction, and it's time to double check. If you place too much trust in your map app, you could learn better by reading some chilling stories of complete failure.  

In 2017, 24-year-old [Amber] VanHecke had embarked on a solo trip to the Grand Canyon. In the middle of the Arizona desert, she noticed that she only had 70 miles' worth of gas left in the tank. Not an issue, as her Google Maps reassured her that she was only 35 miles away from a highway. Trusting Google, she obediently followed the app to bring her safely to civilization. Instead, Google told her to turn onto a completely nonexistent road, which led her to a nonexistent spot on the map. And then she ran out of gas.

VanHecke spent five days in the desert before help arrived. Unlike most travelers, she had a supply of water and food in her car. Read her story and six others at Cracked.

(Image credit: Arizona Department of Public Safety)


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An Honest Trailer for The Greatest Showman

The Greatest Showman was loosely based on the life of PT Barnum. Proving that there's a sucker born every minute, my brother took his entire family to see the movie without realizing that it's a musical. That bothered him more than the fact that the story was totally fictional and had nothing to do with the real Barnum.

(YouTube link)

Screen Junkies corrects that by giving new lyrics to the songs in this Honest Trailer for The Greatest Showman.


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How to Fall Asleep Anywhere, Anytime, According to Military Veterans

Millions of people have spent time in the U.S. military over the past 250 years, and they come home with valuable life skills that go far beyond warfare. Service leaves you no time to waste, so any period that's not filled with the task at hand can be used to catch up on sleep, particularly during travel. You can't let uncomfortable seats, changing schedules, or tomorrow's plans get in the way.

If your to-do list springs to mind just as you’re nodding off, there’s a low-tech solution for that, courtesy of Ben Feibleman, a Marine Corps vet who has visited more than 50 countries. “I've found it's easier if I keep a notepad with me or on my nightstand,” he says. “I write down what I can't stop thinking about as a kind of to-do list for the morning. That works as an ‘unburdening the mind’ trick.”

For extra unwinding, try some on some oms. “Meditation has helped me to have much greater control of my mind, curb that irritating inner-dialogue, and fend off unwelcome thoughts,” Burton says. “Not only do I sleep better, but I'm much more able to focus on and comprehend more of the world around me.”

Thrillist spoke to several veterans who shared a variety of tips for falling asleep when the opportunity was there.  -via Digg

(Image credit: Flickr user DVIDSHUB)


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The Secret Art Deco Apartment Hidden Inside Radio City Music Hall

New York's Radio City Music Hall opened in 1932, and has remained one of the crown jewels of the city ever since. It was largely the work of impresario Roxy Rothafel, who had also opened the Roxy Theater not long before. Rothafel incorporated many of his grand ideas into the new showplace, including the multiple balconies, oval theater shape, and lobby murals. He pioneered the use of a live orchestra to accompany movies, and gave us the line of dancers we know as the Rockettes. For all this, he got his own apartment inside Radio City Music Hall. But Rothafel only enjoyed it a few years before he died in 1936. The apartment was locked, to become a time capsule of the period. Today it is only open for special occasions, but we can take a peek inside at Messy Nessy Chic.

(Image credit: Luke J. Spencer)


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Rube Goldberg Cake Server

(YouTube link)

Joseph Herscher of Joseph's Machines (previously) designed a delightful and inventive chain-reaction sequence that serves him a piece of delicious pineapple upside-down cake. This one involves crashing electronics, a baby playing with a phone, and a candle that initiates motion by melting butter. The wheel that rolls over his head is a bonus. And the baby gets a piece of cake, too! The story behind the cake server is in a different video. -via Boing Boing


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Suddenly, a Baby

Seth Meyers, host of Late Night with Seth Meyers, usually begins his monologue with jokes about the news of the day. Monday night was different. He opened the show by announcing that his wife had given birth to his second baby son on Sunday. On the floor of the lobby of their apartment building.

(YouTube link)

Luckily for Seth, there was no time to panic before it was over, and Alexi and baby Axel were attended after the fact by the NYFD. An event like that in the hands of a professional storyteller is well worth hearing.  

See more about baby and kids at NeatoBambino

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Jelly Mario

Jelly Mario by Stefan Hedman is a surreal browser game that combines Super Mario Bros. with QWOP. Imagine playing a familiar video game while coming out of serious anesthesia or downing a half-dozen martinis. The music is just as distorted as the action, and changes speed as you work the controls. Hint: remember that "up" is whichever direction Mario's head is pointing at the time. Hedman is still working on the game; you can get a preview of level 1-2 here, or see if you can get that far yourself. -via The Verge


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Silo Demolition Goes off Script

This is Vordingborg, Denmark. A concrete silo near the harbor is ready to be demolished. The wedge-shaped holes cut out of the bottom are to ensure that silo will fall to the right when explosives are detonated. They have prepared the area to the right to contain the debris as much as possible. The white building to the left is the town's library, which was closed for the occasion. What could possibly go wrong? While the library was not "destroyed" as the video title insinuates, the silo came awful close to it.

(YouTube link)

The Vordingborg local government said volunteer firefighters worked through the night to help secure the cultural centre.

The library said though books and everything else were covered in dust, there was little structural damage to the interior.

An investigation into the demolition has been launched to determine what went wrong.


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The Saga of Sakeru Gum

(YouTube link)

Sakeru gum comes in regular and long. In these TV ads, Chi-chan seems to prefer the long kind. About a dozen ads ran in the series over the past year, and we are lucky to have them all together with subtitles. While technically SFW, it's full of innuendo that wouldn't fly so well on American TV. The story takes some turns as Chi-chan battles her temptation and constantly loses, but it ends with a twist you do not see coming at all. -via Geeks Are Sexy


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Profile for Miss Cellania

  • Member Since 2012/08/04


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