Miss Cellania's Blog Posts

Taxidermy with Human Faces

Kate Clark is a taxidermy artist who sculpts human faces on the animals she uses. From the artist’s statement:

The unexpectedness of the human face on these animals also evokes curiosity. They are obviously reconstructed yet they are not monstrous, they are approachable, natural, calm, innocent, dignified. The facial features are believable and the skin, which is the animal’s skin, has been shaved to reveal porous and oily features that we recognize as our own. The viewer has an intimate relationship with the face and then identifies with the animal, acknowledging the animalistic inheritance within the human condition.

You can browse through the collection as a slideshow by starting here. -via Metafilter


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 
New T-Shirts from the NeatoShop:



A Note About the Kitchen Mess

Redditor labuzan has teenagers who don’t put their dishes in the dishwasher. I can completely relate to that. What he did was simply leave this note in the kitchen for them, featuring the familiar face of Liam Neeson. I would do this myself, but I really don’t know if my two have seen the movie Taken. -via Uproxx


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

Why Time Speeds Up As You Get Older

Maximilian Keiner gives us an interactive tool to simulate the advance of time over our lifespan. Be thankful that he gave us a 100-year life, as this is a data visualization about relativity. You scroll down to follow your life year after year -don’t worry, it doesn’t have events in it- and see where you are. It feels as if you’ll never get out of childhood, but then before you even realize it, years have slipped away in the blink of an eye. -via Digg


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

You Are in a Heap of Trouble Now

Lieutenant Higgins of the St. Landry Parish Sheriff’s Department in Louisiana has a few things to say to the lowlife scum who burglarized his favorite lunch spot. After watching this, you’ll be ready to turn yourself in, even if you’ve never heard of Stelly’s Supermarket and Restaurant!

(YouTube link)

Higgins is a legend in the WATC coverage area. You can see more of his matter-of-fact Crime Stoppers videos on YouTube. -via reddit


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

Ten Cats and a Ball of Ice

Any time we drop an ice cube on the floor at my house, we toss it into the cats' water. They seem to like it, but now I want to make them a big ball of ice!

(YouTube link)

This video is from the blog formerly known as 9 Cats, which is now 10 Cats with the addition of the kitten Osamu. See more of the cats in our previous posts. -via Tastefully Offensive

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

Some Things are Built to Last

Driving the same car for 77 years wouldn’t be too bad if it was this car. Allen Swift of Springfield, Massachusetts, completed college in 1928. His father bought him a Rolls Royce Piccadilly P1 Roadster as a graduation gift. Swift took good care of his car, and drove it until his death in 2005. 

Swift was a legend among Rolls-Royce collectors for owning his green Phantom I, S273 FP Rolls longer than anyone in the world had ever owned an individual Rolls-Royce. In recognition of that fact, Rolls-Royce Motors presented him with a crystal Spirit of Ecstasy award at the Rolls-Royce Annual Meeting in 1994.

In fact, Swift Swift also set a record for being the oldest living person to have owned a car from new.

Swift bequeathed his vehicle and a million dollars to the Springfield Museums. The car is now on display at the Lyman and Merrie Wood Museum of Springfield History. -via reddit


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

Nano-Pasta: Thin Film Realization of Ultra-Fast Cooking Pasta Using Glancing Angle Deposition

The following is an article from The Annals of Improbable Research.

by W. M. J. GreCJI, K. L. Westra, K. Robbie, and M. J. Brett
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering,  University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta

With the ever-increasing demands of urban life, individuals are ever less able to find time for their fundamental daily tasks. One of the most time consuming activities undertaken during an average day is the preparation of meals: breakfast, lunch, and supper. Our society has increasingly demanded for meals that are quick to prepare, yet nutritious. As a result, we now have dishes such as instant rice, microwave dinners, and minute noodles and soups.

In this article, we present a novel addition to the "fast food" lineup. Dubbed "Nanopasta" for its small size and phenomenally rapid cooking time, this new variety of pasta can be produced with the aid of a thin film deposition technology known as glancing angle deposition1 (GLAD).

Nanopasta
Nanopasta is made by evaporating Durum wheat in a vacuum. The vapor is then directed at glancing incidence toward a rotating substrate. The schematic in Figure 1 illustrates this process, which is also currently used for other materials.2 Once Nanopasta has been deposited on the substrate, it may be harvested by a special etching process. Figure 2a shows a scanning electron microscope image of one shape, called Nano-fusilli. The photo illustrates the nanometer size scale of Nanopasta. Figure 2b shows an image of a Nano-fusilli film immediately after deposition but before the etch harvesting process. The substrate shown in the image is a silicon wafer.

Theoretical Background-AI Dente's Ratio
Theory indicates that the most efficient way to cook dry pasta is to immerse it water that is at the boiling point. Depending on the variety and shape of pasta being prepared, the cooking process may require a relatively short or long period of time.

Continue reading

Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

MASH Notes: The Story Behind "Suicide is Painless"

The following is an article from the book Uncle John's Canoramic Bathroom Reader.

The unlikely origin of an instantly recognizable theme song.

THE MOVIE

Early in his career, Robert Altman had a reputation for being difficult. When he was still directing TV shows like Maverick and Bonanza, he’d been fired several times over “creative differences” with his bosses. He was recognized as talented, but his rancorous nature slowed his work to a trickle. Finally in 1969, after nearly two decades of struggling, he got a big break. He was offered the opportunity to direct a film version of MASH, Richard Hooker’s 1968 novel about three doctors’ misadventures in a mobile army surgical hospital (MASH) during the Korean War. Altman wasn’t the studio’s first choice. In fact, he wasn’t even their tenth choice. More than a dozen other directors had rejected the project, and with good reason: at a time when the war in Vietnam was a very controversial topic, MASH’s mix of crude hijinks and badly injured soldiers had the smell of a box-office disaster. But Altman didn’t have a lot to lose, so he took the job.

FACING THE MUSIC

Analyzing the script, Altman was aware that he was walking a tightrope between slapstick and tragedy. But if he could craft a scene that successfully combined both, he felt that he could probably figure out the rest of the movie. He settled on a scene he nicknamed “The Last Supper,” in which Captain Walter “Painless Pole” Waldowski decides to kill himself after an embarrassing failure in the bedroom, and in response, his friends wine and dine with him in a pre-death “wake” in which his seat of honor is a casket.

Continue reading

Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

We The Sheeple

Now it's time to be serenaded by a sheep as he gets sheared. That’s all that it takes to get me to watch it, but you might need to watch it twice to catch all the lyrics.

(YouTube link)

This is an ad for a New Zealand marketing agency. The theme is “embrace change,” but I can't really tell that there's any point besides showing off what they can do. (via Metafilter)


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

That Time He Made a Chicken Dinner

Jeremy Husted has his house rigged with security cameras. That’s the only way to catch a moment like this. He said he occasionally forgets he has cats. Contains NSFW language.

(YouTube link)

In the comments at reddit, we get some advice on a device that will train your cats to stay off the kitchen counters. Continue reading if you want to see how well it works, but do not watch if you have liquid in your mouth.

Continue reading
Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

This is How You Sell a Woodland Retreat

A real estate listing for a 20-acre farm in Vulcan, Michigan, highlights the features of the property, like all such listings do. Or should. This spread has a lovely two-story home with all wood interior, a lake view, outbuildings, and oh, yeah! Plenty of wildlife, too. It would be too cool to find out that the deer came over to visit while the realtor was having pictures made, but my guess is that this photo was taken by the current owners. -Thanks, Jeneen Martin!


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

A Nice Dip in the Pool

A hot summer afternoon and a backyard pool. That’s nice, but when you take too much time to clown around for the camera, something unexpected might happen. The laughter from behind the camera only egged him on.

(YouTube link)

Like they say, pride goeth before a fall. -via Viral Viral Videos


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

William Ellsworth “Dummy" Hoy: Baseball's Greatest Deaf Player

Neatorama presents a guest post from actor, comedian, and voiceover artist Eddie Deezen. Visit Eddie at his website or at Facebook.

Around the turn of the 20th century, in much less PC times, there was an excellent baseball player named William Ellsworth Hoy. Because of the social agreements of the times back then, William was nicknamed “Dummy.” Why? Dummy Hoy was a deaf mute.

In those less enlightened times, many deaf mutes were nicknamed Dummy. And, for the record, William Hoy never minded his nickname, instead embracing it. If anyone ever called him “William,” he would always correct them, asking that they call him “Dummy" instead.

William Ellsworth Hoy was born in Houcktown, Ohio, in 1862. At the age of three, he went deaf from meningitis. He graduated from the Ohio State School for the Deaf and was the class valedictorian.

Hoy opened a shoe repair shop in his hometown and started playing baseball on the weekends. His natural talent was spotted almost immediately and in 1888, Dummy broke into the big leagues with the Washington Nationals. He was to play 14 seasons in the major leagues, playing with several different teams in Washington, Cincinnati, Buffalo, St. Louis, Louisville and Chicago.

Dummy Hoy was a superior baseball player, with a .288 lifetime batting average, while stealing 596 bases (some sources credit him with over 600 stolen bases). Besides being a very good hitter, with over 2,000 hits, Dummy was a superb center fielder. At the time of his retirement in 1902, he had set and held several fielding records for outfielders.

Continue reading

Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

14 Not-So-Dirty Facts About Dirty Dancing

Released in August of 1987, the movie Dirty Dancing became a surprise hit, and then a surprise classic. What made it so memorable for so many people? Was it watching Patrick Swayze dance? Was it memories of coming-of-age summers we’ve all had? For me, it was that song, which I played on air for weeks before I saw the film.  

4. RIGHTEOUS BROTHER BILL MEDLEY THOUGHT HE WAS BEING HIRED TO RECORD A SONG FOR A “BAD PORNO.”

Medley and Jennifer Warnes sang the vocals to the Oscar-winning song “(I’ve Had) The Time of My Life.” Medley told Songfacts that Dirty Dancing music supervisor Jimmy Ienner called him and mentioned he was gathering music for the movie. “It sounds like a bad porno movie,” he told Ienner. Medley’s wife was expecting a baby, so he turned the song down. A few months later Ienner convinced him to do the song, even though Medley didn’t think the movie would be popular. “We [Jennifer Warnes] just went in to work together, to sing together, and little did we know it was going to be the biggest movie of the year. Just unbelievable,” Medley said. The song ended up selling more than 500,000 copies, and Medley ended up titling his own memoir The Time of My Life. (Note: The film was actually the 11th highest grossing film of the year; Three Men and a Baby took the top spot for 1987.)

9. ACCORDING TO BERGSTEIN, EASTERN EUROPE WATCHES A LOT OF DIRTY DANCING.

In a 2006 interview with The Guardian, Bergstein talked about the movie’s popularity with people in the former Eastern Bloc. “And in Russia, it’s policy in the battered women’s shelters, when a woman comes in for help. First, they wash and dress her wounds, then they give her soup. Then they sit her down and show her Dirty Dancing. When the Berlin Wall came down, there were all these pictures of kids wearing Dirty Dancing T-shirts; they were saying, ‘We want to have what they have in the West! We want Dirty Dancing!'”

Read the rest of the tidbits about Dirty Dancing at mental_floss.


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

Thorigami: Crafts with the God of Thunder

The crew at Glove and Boots needed somewhere to dump all their Thor puns, so they gave him a DIY show about crafts. This episode is about origami.

(YouTube link)

Thrill to the excitement as the mighty Thor, god of thunder, goes up against a little piece of paper. Try to guess who wins, and who conveniently gets the blame. -via Geeks Are Sexy  


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

Winner of French Scrabble Championship Does Not Speak French

Nigel Richards of New Zealand entered the French-language Scrabble tournament in Louvain, Belgium, and took first place. But he doesn’t speak a word of French. Instead, he memorized a French dictionary.

"He can say 'Bonjour' and count from one to ten, so he can give the score to his opponents" said Liz Fagerlund, a friend, Scrabble aficionado, and longtime supporter. "I believe it took him about nine weeks to memorize all the French words for the tournament."

The trick to his success is learning the words without taking up the brain-space to remember their definitions.

"For Scrabble, there is a dictionary of words without their meanings," says Fagerlund. "It's most likely that he's wired differently; he doesn't even study the pages word by word. He can look at a page full of words and absorb them all."

Richards knows his Scrabble, though, and how to win. He’s held several English-language U.S. and world championships.


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

Kids Explain Adultery

(YouTube link)

The crew of the show Jimmy Kimmel Live went out to pollute little kids' minds by asking them to explain adultery. It turns out that they have no clue, but are smart enough to extrapolate that it means something about an adult, like the opposite of childhood. That makes plenty of sense linguistically. So the interviewer switched to asking them to explain cheating. Kids know what cheating is, because they are warned against doing it in school. By the time they’re through, it’s apparent that no young minds were polluted after all. However, some parents may be confronted by confounding questions later. -via Viral Viral Videos

See more about baby and kids at NeatoBambino

Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

We’re the Best!

Yep, it’s togetherness all down the line, um, unless we’re different in any way. When that’s the case, we can take pride in our own superiority. This is the latest from Doghouse Diaries.


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

Stretch Limo vs. Train

This video demonstrates how long it takes a loaded train to stop once the brakes are applied. Yeah, about a mile, and the train wasn’t even going fast. Some accidents can’t be avoided, but you never mess with a train. It also highlights what a dumb design a stretch really is, even though local people say the crossing is badly in need of repair.

(YouTube link)

The accident occurred last week in Ellkhart County, Indiana. A bunch of teenagers were in a  limousine to celebrate a birthday. They all got out as soon as the vehicle became stuck on the tracks, and no one was injured in the crash. You can see the aftermath in a short video by the local sheriff’s department. The limo came out better than I would have expected, but like I said, the train wasn’t going all that fast.  -via Metafilter


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

The Incredible Shrinking Movies

Ant Man is in theaters now, featuring a superhero that ’s been shrunk to a tiny size. That’s an idea that’s been used a few times before. It’s an opportunity to show off some special effects skills, and give audiences a different point of view. Remember Attack of the Puppet People? Of course you don’t.

Sally Reynolds (June Kenney) takes a job as secretary for the kindly-seeming dollmaker Mr. Franz (John Hoyt), unaware that her new boss is so afraid of being alone that he shrinks certain people down to one-sixth their size and keeps them around as “friends.” Filmmaker Bert I. Gordon went from one extreme (The Amazing Colossal Man) to the other with this C-lister, which -- like a lot of Gordon’s movies -- has its entertainment value even at its silliest.

Den of Geek has a list of twelve memorable films where less is more. You’ve probably seen more of them than you realize.  


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

Drone Rescues Drone from Roof

Harrisen Howes let a friend operate a drone while drunk, the friend crashed the drone on a neighbor’s roof. A couple of months later, Howes had a bigger drone, which he rigged with some hooks made from coat hangers in order to rescue the original drone. Let’s see how that worked.

(YouTube link)

Success! Made even sweeter by the addition of majestic music to the footage. -via Tastefully Offensive


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

Myers, Briggs, and the World's Most Popular Personality Test

From corporate offices to Internet dating sites, Americans lean on personality tests to make their toughest decisions. But do the results really mean anything?

(Image credit: Jake Beech)

Have you ever been told that you're an extrovert? An introvert? Those terms come from the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator Test. Psychologists, therapists, personnel directors, guidance counselors, and dating services all use variations of the Myers-Briggs Test.

Big-name companies rely on it, as well. Wachovia Bank, Hewlett-Packard, AstraZeneca pharmaceuticals, and the U.S. Department of Defense all license the personality exam for in-house use. And those quizzes on Facebook—Which type of vampire are you? What color is your personality?—also owe a debt to the legendary exam.

But how exactly did one personality test come to dominate the American cultural landscape? And why do so many psychologists and psychiatrists question the test's validity? Both answers may lie in the fact that Isabel Myers and Katharine Briggs weren't trained scientists.

This is Just a Test

Continue reading

Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

Yakety Max

Here is yet another excuse for us to enjoy the amazing visuals of the film Mad Max: Fury Road again with a remix video. As Alex would say (and he probably will), “So shiny and chrome!”

(YouTube link)

The chase scenes lend themselves well to a heavy metal version of "Yakety Sax." The music is by Eric Calderone.  -via Uproxx

However, if you prefer the old school Junior Walker version used as the theme to The Benny Hill Show, here’s the Mad Max video for you.

(YouTube link)


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

A Fossil Snake With Four Legs

University of Portsmouth professor David Martill discovered a new species of extinct snake -in a museum. It was labeled “unknown fossil” at the Bürgermeister Müller Museum in Solnhofen, Germany. He recognized it as a snake, but what about those four legs? The fossil was collected from Brazil and dated to the early Cretaceous period, where snakes haven’t been found before.

Martill called the creature Tetrapodophis: four-legged snake. “This little animal is the Archaeopteryx of the squamate world,” he says. (Squamates are the snakes and lizards.) Archaeopteryx is the feathered fossil whose mish-mash of features hinted at the evolutionary transition from dinosaurs to birds. In the same way, Martill says, the new snake hints at how these legless, slithering serpents evolved from four-legged, striding lizards.

There are two competing and fiercely contested ideas about this transition. The first says that snakes evolved in the ocean, and only later recolonised the land. This hypothesis hinges on the close relationship between snakes and extinct marine reptiles called mosasaurs (yes, the big swimming one from Jurassic World). The second hypothesis says that snakes evolved from burrowing lizards, which stretched their bodies and lost their limbs to better wheedle their way through the ground. In this version, snakes and mosasaurs both independently evolved from a land-lubbing ancestor—probably something like a monitor lizard.

The Tetrapodophis fossil would lend credence to the latter theory. But no fossil is perfect, and scientists do not agree on how the four-legged snake fits into the evolutionary line or even whether it is really a snake. Read what we know -and don’t know- about Tetrapodophis at Not Exactly Rocket Science.

(Image credit: James Brown, University of Portsmouth)


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

The Pimps that May Save Tomatoes

These tiny tomatoes, their size measured in millimeters, are one of the ancient ancestors of the huge variety of tomatoes we eat today. Native to Peru, Solanum pimpinellifolium tomatoes are commonly called “pimps.”

Although you’d never know it from the colorful cornucopia on display at any farmers’ market on a summer Saturday, all modern domestic tomatoes (known botanically as Solanum lycopersicum) are remarkably similar. Taken together, they possess no more than 5 percent of the total genetic variation present within the wild species and primitive varieties. The domestic tomato’s progenitor has the other 95 or more percent. Modern tomatoes may taste good and offer eye appeal, but they lack many genes that allow them to fight disease and survive drought.

By contrast, the pimps and about a dozen other tomato relatives that grow wild in western South America are a tough crew, adapted to survive without the help of farmers in dramatically different climates: from some of the driest, harshest desert landscapes in the world to humid, rain forest lowlands to chilly alpine slopes. As far as we know, the inhabitants of the region never domesticated them. But a thousand miles to the north, the pre-Columbian residents of what is now southern Mexico set about planting and cultivating them, saving the seeds of those that bore the biggest, tastiest fruits and crossing desirable plants with one another. Distance prevented these early farmers from crossbreeding their new varieties with the original populations.

Scientists would like to crossbreed pimps with modern tomatoes to develop hardier breeds that can deal with climate change and monoculture challenges. But there are challenges. Pimps are dying out due to loss of habitat and commercial herbicides. And there are political problems with exporting seeds from Peru. And Peru itself is not interested in saving the pimps. Read about all these factors and author Barry Estabrook’s quest to taste a wild pimp, at Smithsonian.

(Image credit: Scott Peacock, C.M. Rick Tomato Genetics Resource Center)


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

Life on Pluto, Circa 1959

Now that we are learning a lot about Pluto, thanks to the New Horizons probe, maybe its time to revisit a retrofuturistic vision of the former ninth planet. In 1959, author Donald A. Wollheim published what would now be called a YA novel called The Secret of the Ninth Planet.

“I have the feeling I’ve been here before,” Russ said slowly.

Burl felt an odd chill. “Yes, that’s it!”

Haines grumbled. “I know what you mean. I can make a guess. We’ve never really been the right weight since we left Earth. Even under acceleration there were differences one way or the other. But I feel now exactly as I did on Earth. That’s what gives you the odd sensation of return.”

The two younger men realized Haines was right. For the first time since they had left their home world, they were on a planet whose gravity was normal to them. It felt good and yet it felt—in these fearful surroundings—disconcerting.

Well, you have to remember this was 1959, before any American had escaped the pull of gravity. Certainly Pluto has some, more than you’d experience in space flight, but nothing like Earth’s. But the description of Pluto is what’s fascinating about the excerpt at Collector’s Weekly. Too bad it doesn’t include the part where they meet the Plutonians. 


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

George R.R. Martin Died in Sharknado 3

The author behind A Song of Ice and Fire, George R.R. Martin, continues his quest to avoid writing an end to the saga that spawned the TV show Game of Thrones. Martin was seen briefly in the TV movie Sharnado 3: Oh Hell No when it debuted last night. In a bit of poetic justice, his character was promptly killed. Director director Anthony C. Ferrante had this to say about the cameo:

"We wanted him in the movie, he wanted to be in the movie, so we went to New Mexico, and we shot it for a day,” Ferrante said. “He originally had a line — and we’ll add it back in for the DVD — where he went outside, shivered, and said, ‘Winter’s coming.’ But we thought about it and decided that we wanted people to watch it and go, ‘Wait, is that … Is that George R.R. Martin?’ ”

Beyond the fun factor of spending a day with Martin and filming the cameo, Ferrante was also excited about the reaction that the author’s appearance would induce in a certain segment of the viewership. “I love the fact that we’re going to piss off all the Game of Thrones fans," he said. "Instead of writing his damned book, he was busy hanging out with us, filming a scene for Sharknado 3!”

-via Uproxx


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

15 Things You Might Not Know About Yellowstone National Park

Everyone should travel to Yellowstone National Park at least once in their life. I did a couple of years ago, but there’s so much to see that you’d have to spend weeks there to even scratch the surface. Which means, of course, that there’s a lot to learn about the huge park. It’s got geysers, volcanos, extremophiles, and more wildlife than you can shake a stick at. But don’t do that -the animals may find it annoying. You don’t want to annoy bears, bison, and wolves. And the things you don’t see are interesting, too.

13. YELLOWSTONE IS THE SUBJECT OF A LEGAL ANOMALY.

All Yellowstone National Park territory falls under the legal jurisdiction of the United States District Court for the District of Wyoming. However, only 96 percent of Yellowstone falls within Wyoming state lines; the remaining four percent is split between Montanan and Idahoan land. This makes Wyoming’s the only district court to oversee land in more than one state.

14. THE PARK HAS ITS OWN JUDICIAL SYSTEM.

The previous point is more than just legal trivia. While Yellowstone offers a treasure trove of spectacles that any visitor should make a point to see, the park’s jail isn’t a must-see destination. As of 2006, Yellowstone boasts its own justice system, which includes a courtroom, presiding judge, and four holding cells. Furthermore, major crimes that occur on park grounds fall under the legal jurisdiction of one specifically assigned FBI Agent.

Read more of the history, features, and trivia of Yellowstone National Park at mental_floss. 

(Image credit: Daniel Mayer)


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

Magic Money Stickers

I read this comic from Megacynics and had to go look up postage rates… maybe I’ve missed something? No, postage stamps aren’t a dollar each just yet. It is currently 49 cents for a first-class letter. But if you had asked me yesterday, I really didn’t know the current postage rate -the last time I paid attention, it was 44 cents. I do send out mail, but only a few bills each month, and I buy stamps by the page, usually by sending a kid to get them. Since they are all “forever” stamps, they don’t say how much they cost on them. You know, that was a genius move on the part of the USPS. They could easily go to a dollar and few would even notice. Especially since you only buy them about once a year. But a dollar rate would certainly wipe out the few remaining Christmas card senders.   


Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 

Rosie Retrieves Her Ball

(YouTube link)

Rosie is upset that her ball went into the pool. Rosie doesn’t want to swim, and really doesn’t even want to get wet. What will she do? She uses her brain, that’s what! Oh well, maybe it was a lucky move, but she got her ball back in the end! -via Arbroath

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

Load More Comments
Start New Comment Thread...
Preview Comment
Start New Thread Post Your Reply

 
Email This Post to a Friend
""

Separate multiple emails with a comma. Limit 5.

 

Success! Your email has been sent!

close window

Page 2 of 693     prev | next | last

Profile for Miss Cellania

  • Member Since 2012/08/04


Statistics

Blog Posts

  • Posts Written 20,771
  • Comments Received 90,184
  • Post Views 28,559,003
  • Unique Visitors 22,399,808
  • Likes Received 22,807

Comments

  • Threads Started 3,514
  • Replies Posted 1,941
  • Likes Received 1,265