Miss Cellania's Blog Posts

The Man Who Played with Absolute Power

 

You are probably familiar with the Stanford Prison Experiment, in which paid volunteer students assumed the roles of prison guards and inmates. The subjects became so submerged in their roles that the "guards" began exhibiting sadistic behavior and the "inmates" approached mental breakdown. The experiment was scheduled to last two weeks, but was halted after six days. Philip Zimbardo, the professor who conducted the 1971 experiment, gives us some of the details.

Did subjects try to resist their roles as prisoners or guards?

They did. We did things that made it very realistic: parole board hearings, parents visiting. But students in 1971 were anti-war activists. Many students on many campuses protested against the war, were beaten up or suffered abuse by their local police. So nobody wanted to be a prison guard. Initially, it was very difficult for the boys playing prison guards to get into their role. But, the second day of the study, the prisoners rebelled. They did not want to be dehumanized, because one way to take away power is to take away your name, your style, the way you wear your hair and so forth.

How did the guards react to the rebellion?

All 12 guards came in, and they crushed the rebellion. At that point, the guards said, “These are dangerous prisoners. We have to show who is in charge, who is the boss.” That changed everything. That’s when it became a prison. No one used the word “experiment” again. The guards used physical force—stripped the prisoners  naked, put them in chains, put them in solitary confinement. There was actually fighting. The guards used psychological force to make prisoners feel helpless and hopeless. That’s when I should have intervened and did not.

Zimbardo also talks about the intoxication of absolute power and how Abu Ghraib compared with his experiment in an interview at Nautilus. -via Digg

Read how the Stanford Prison Experiment was conducted here


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Library Hand, the Fastidiously Neat Penmanship Style Made for Card Catalogs

In the 1880s, libraries were growing fast. Each new book acquired needed an entry in the card catalog. While librarians are liable to be educated and use good penmanship, the cards were still hard to read because the nice script had "too much flourishing.” A library summit meeting was held in Late George, New York in September 1885. One of the attendees was Melvil Dewey, who had developed the Dewey Decimal System. The problem of catalog cards was discussed, and a highly legible new style of writing was proposed. It was eventually called "library hand."

Influenced by Edison and honed via experimenting on patient, hand-sore librarians, library hand focused on uniformity rather than beauty. ”The handwriting of the old-fashioned writing master is quite as illegible as that of the most illiterate boor,” read a New York State Library School handbook. “Take great pains to have all writing uniform in size, blackness of lines, slant, spacing and forms of letters,” wrote Dewey in 1887. And if librarians thought they could get away with just any black ink, they could think again real fast. ”Inks called black vary much in color,” scoffed the New York State Library School handwriting guide.

Dewey and his crew of “a dozen catalogers and librarians” spent, in his estimation, “an hour daily for nearly an entire week” hashing out the rules of library hand. They started by examining hundreds of card catalogs, looking for penmanship problems and coming up with ways to solve them. They concluded that the “simpler and fewer the lines the better,” and decided that, while a slant was best avoided, a slight backward slant was acceptable. Then they got to the more nitty-gritty stuff, such as whether to opt for a “square-topped 3” or a “rounded-top 3.” (The rounded-top 3 won out, as it is less likely to be mistaken for a 5 during hasty reading.)

You might argue that it would have been easier for librarians to learn to type. Read about the history and usage of library hand at Atlas Obscura. 

(Image credit: Ella Morton)


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Cat Profiles by Obvious Plant

A picture is worth a thousand words, but you also want to learn a little about a cat's personality. Knowing their likes and dislikes will help.



These profiles are from a series of cat labels from Obvious Plant. See all ten of them here. The cats are all real, and available for adoption through the Santé D’Or Foundation in Los Angeles. -via Metafilter

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

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The Messy History of the Pie Fight

The second-best use for baked goods is the cinematic pie fight. Getting a whipped cream-topped pie to the face is a great visual, certainly more pleasant than other thrown foods, and doesn't leave major injuries. A timeline of pie fights in movies gives us stories of notorious pie fights. The earliest existing example of the pie in the face is from 1909, followed by a full-blown fight in 1913. Even Dr. Strangelove was supposed to end with a pie fight, but that didn't work out.

So as Kubrick later said, ‘It was a disaster of Homeric proportions.’” Because the scene was so expensive to shoot and clean up from, the studio only gave them one chance to film it. But since the actors were clearly smiling throughout filming, the footage was unusable. The scene has since become one of the most famous unseen pieces of celluloid in cinematic history. Apparently, pie fights make up a majority of that list.

Read the history of pie fights in the movies, with plenty of videos, at Hopes and Fears. -Thanks, Walter Mosley!


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The Rise, Fall, and Resurrection of FDR's Floating White House

While many U.S. presidents enjoyed the services of a yacht, the most famous of those boats is the USS Potomac, the yacht that provided a refuge for Franklin D. Roosevelt from 1936 to 1945. The Coast Guard cutter was built to intercept bootleggers during Prohibition, but then was determined to be a good fit for Roosevelt. And so it was refitted with features to accommodate the president, and the president's wheelchair.

The biggest change was to install a spacious, shaded aft deck, where Roosevelt could work or entertain while enjoying river or ocean breezes. “When the ship was a Coast Guard cutter, this deck did not exist,” Dropkin says, as we walk across its teak surface, “but it was a favorite area of the president.” That’s probably because the seating on the deck was designed with the wheelchair-bound Roosevelt in mind. Dropkin points to an upholstered settee that follows the curve of the ship’s stern. “It’s about 4 feet deep in the middle,” he says, “to support the president’s legs, something for him to stretch out on. You can almost imagine him sitting there, drink in hand.

“Roosevelt was a martini guy,” Dropkin continues. “A good cocktail was very important to him. He had started having cocktail hour when he was governor of New York, and brought the practice with him to the White House. His wife, Eleanor, wasn’t crazy about that, but they were different people."

Other changes to the Electra that were more particular to Roosevelt included the removal of the floor coamings designed to contain water that might be sloshing on deck. For example, the low barrier was removed between the main dining room and the presidential bedroom, so that Roosevelt could get himself between the two spaces in his wheelchair. Even more dramatic was the conversion of one of the ship’s two smokestacks into an elevator, allowing the president to move freely between to ship’s two main decks. “An elevator was built into what had been the rear smokestack,” Dropkin says. “It’s an electric elevator now, but when the president used it, it was literally just a platform roped to a pulley. He would pull himself up, or let himself down, arm over arm. Roosevelt was very strong, and always wanted to do things for himself.”

After Roosevelt's death, the Potomac went on many other adventures, such as the ill-fated trip to the World's Fair, a purchase by Elvis Presley, drug-running, and a sinking. But the Potomac is getting ready for a new life as a landmark. Read the entire story of the USS Potomac at Collectors Weekly.  

(Image credit: Christopher J. Wood)


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The Matrix Starring Forrest Gump

How It Should Have Ended and Klomp! Animation have teamed up for a new series of animations called Hero Swap. In this video, they've taken the title character from the 1994 movie Forrest Gump and made him the protagonist in the 1999 movie The Matrix.

(YouTube link)

They've managed to depict the memorable visuals of The Matrix and shoehorn in the most memorable catchphrases from Forrest Gump. That's pretty neat. -via Tastefully Offensive 


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Dr. Strangelove Remix

Stanley Kubrick's Cold war satire Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb was a masterpiece of unsettling comedy that stands the test of time. If you don't have the time to re-watch the whole thing, enjoy the best lines of the movie (often rhyming, no less) in the new musical remix by Eclectic Method with Martin Ware.

(YouTube link)

Martyn Ware, founder of Human League, Heaven 17, legendary producer of Tina Turner and Erasure, Multimedia artist and professor has teamed up with Eclectic Method to remix Dr. Strangelove. With relations between East and West at such an ambiguous point and the Doomsday Clock closer to midnight then it's been since the Cuban Missile Crisis what better time to revisit the Stanley Kubrick Classic. "Gentlemen, You can't fight in here this is war room!"

-via Laughing Squid


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Seven Reality TV Shows That Were Way Ahead of Their Time

Reality TV shows are all over your TV channel lineup. The unscripted shows took over because with fewer professionals hired, they were inexpensive and because viewers like them. And we've learned that "unscripted" does not always mean "reality." But before every channel had a lineup of unscripted shows, there were precursors of the genre that were much less planned out, whether they were documentary style dramas, hidden camera pranks, or competitions. A list of early reality shows (with video evidence) at TVOM goes back to the beginnings of each reality TV genre, from twenty, thirty, and even forty years ago.


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Winston Churchill's Essay on Aliens

 

British Prime Minister Winston Churchill led his nation through World War II, but also had varied interests we know little about. He once wrote an 11-page essay revealing that he believed in extraterrestrial life. Was this an old college assignment? No, it was written in 1939, only a year before he was elevated to prime minister. The long lost article was only recently discovered at the US National Churchill Museum at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri.

At the time Churchill penned the essay, astronomers favoured a theory that had planets form when stars ripped material off one another as they swept past. Because such encounters were bound to be rare, he reasoned that our sun might be alone in hosting planets. But Churchill proved a good sceptic. “I am not sufficiently conceited,” he writes,” to think that my sun is the only one with a family of planets.” His intuition was right. Astronomers have now spotted thousands of planets beyond the solar system.

Step by step, Churchill reaches a view and expresses it a final sentence that mixes despair with optimism. He writes: “I, for one, am not so immensely impressed by the success we are making of our civilisation here that I am prepared to think we are the only spot in this immense universe which contains living, thinking creatures, or that we are the highest type of mental and physical development which has ever appeared in the vast compass of space and time.”

Churchill had an education grounded in science, and went on to hire the first British government science advisor and helped to fund British laboratories. The article is thought to have been intended for a newspaper, but was never published. Read more about this discovery at the Guardian-Thanks, John Farrier!


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The Underwater Photographs Of The Year

The annual Underwater Photographer of the Year competition has announced its winners, and the pictures are gorgeous. Gabriel Barathieu of France won the top honor, Underwater Photographer of the Year, with this image of an octopus. Photos were recognized in quite a few categories, such as Wide Angle, Macro, Wrecks, Behaviour, and Portrait. You can see a selection of the winners in a gallery at Digg, and check out all the top images in all the categories at the competition site.


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Stuff in Space

Stuff in Space is a neat interactive visualization of all the objects orbiting the earth. There are tons of satellites, spacecraft parts, and debris out there, just circling the earth until someone does something about it. You can scroll to zoom in and out, and drag to rotate your view of earth and its surroundings. Mouseover to find the name of an object, and you might be able to look it up somewhere. The menu at the top left allows you to sort objects by type.

Notice the distinct red ring 35,800 km above the equator; those are geostationary satellites. You'd think that aliens should be able to find us by all our satellites, rockets, and garbage. -via Metafilter


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10 Presidential Marriage Proposals

(Image credit: Peter and Maria Hoey)

The revealing true stories of how our nation’s greatest romantics in chief put a ring on it.

1. MASTER OF SUBTLETY

Harry Truman met Bess Wallace in Sunday school. He was 6. She was 5. Later, in fifth grade, Wallace sat right behind the future president (their teacher sat them alphabetically). He had a crush on her but was too nervous to speak, later confessing, “If I succeeded in carrying her books to school or back home for her, I had a big day.” For years he courted her. He sent love letters, even sneaking in this proposal while talking about, of all things, the weather: “I guess we’ll all have to go to drinking whiskey if it doesn’t rain very soon. Water and potatoes will soon be as much of a luxury as pineapples and diamonds. Speaking of diamonds, would you wear a solitaire on your left hand should I get it?” She said no. He kept asking, and finally, before he shipped out for World War I, she said yes. Throughout the war, he kept a photo of his fianceĢe in his breast pocket.

2. WILSON’S WISE PICK

Woodrow Wilson is one of three presidents to marry while he was in office. (The other two are John Tyler and Grover Cleveland.) Just months after his first wife died of kidney disease, he was introduced to Edith Galt, the “perfect playmate” who could beat him in golf. (He was 59, and she was 43; the Secret Service referred to her as “Grandma.”) He officially proposed over dinner, although as one contemporary joke put it, “What did Mrs. Galt do when the president proposed to her? She fell out of bed.” Edith later proved to be more than a playmate—she sat in meetings in the Oval Office, and when Wilson suffered a stroke in 1919, she stepped in and served, in her words, as his “steward.” Functionally, she became president, secretly and successfully running the government’s executive branch for the rest of her husband’s term.

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Squirrel Attacks Burglar

Adam Pearl of Meridian, Idaho, came home to find evidence that his home had been burglarized- footprints in the snow, missing items, etc. His pet squirrel Joey was okay, though. As events unfolded, it turns out that Joey had acted as a guard dog, and repeatedly bit the intruder!

(YouTube link)

He should get a "Beware of Squirrel" sign to warn off any future home invaders. Joey is now regarded as a hero. -via Uproxx

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

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Custom LEGO Roller Coaster Dinosaur Amusement Park

James Burrows built a working LEGO roller coaster and set it in an amusement park filled with dinosaurs. Right there you have a hit: LEGO, roller coaster, and dinosaurs. This construction, seen at BrickFair Alabama 2017, uses around 125,000 LEGO pieces. But wait! There's more!

(YouTube link)

This amusement park has a train, a mini-golf course, and more secrets and extra features you would only find if you look closely, or if you listen to the interview. -via Geeks Are Sexy


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How Cats Show Their Love

(YouTube link)

Simon Tofield of Simon's Cat fame illustrates the many ways cats show affection to humans. And the humorously unintended consequences of that affection. Suddenly, I realize that none of my three cats feel any affection at all toward me. Ungrateful beasts. -via Laughing Squid

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

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We'll Start Tomorrow

There's a time and a place for everything. Today is not the day to give up candy. Anyone who isn't scanning the seasonal aisles for bargains the day after a Valentines Day are most likely working on a big box of chocolates they received yesterday. If you bring that idea of eating healthier up later, I'll think of some other reason to put it off. A good reason. This is the latest comic from Megacynics.


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This Beetle Pretends to be an Ant's Butt

A newly-discovered species of beetle manages to benefit from army ants by riding around on them. Nymphister kronaueri is a small red beetle that clamps its jaws around the waist of the army ant Eciton burchellii and tags along, unseen because it looks like the ant's normal backside. Science writer Ed Yong calls it "A prosthetic posterior. A gluteus extraneous. A beetlebum." Christoph von Beeren and Daniel Kronauer discovered the beetle in 2014 in Costa Rica while following the relentless army ants.    

Von Beeren and Kronauer were also relentless. They would watch the ants for hours at a time, sitting in fold-up chairs in the pitch-black jungle, and peering at the legions through headlights.  One day in the spring of 2014, they realized that some of the ants looked a little odd. “The abdomens reflected the light differently, and the color was a little different,” says von Beeren. “Then, we noticed that they looked like they have two abdomens.”

They collected some of these dual-derriered insects and put them in a vial. Back at camp, Kronauer shook the vial… and the back-up backside fell off. It was a beetle. “And it blew our minds,” says von Beeren. After working with USDA entomologist Alexey Tishechkin, he realized that the bonus-butt beetle was new to science. And he named it Nymphister kronaueri, after his colleague Kronauer, who helped to discover it.

Not much is known yet about the beetle. Does it benefit by hiding in plain sight? Does it eat what the ants eat? Read what we do know about the butt beetle at The Atlantic. -via Metafilter

(Image credit:  Daniel Kronauer)


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Doctor Strange Concept Art for Kaecilius

The artists involved with the Marvel movie Doctor Strange wanted the villain Kaecilius to be faithful to the comic book concept while also bringing something fresh to the character. They tried a variety of looks before they settled on the villain you saw in the film, portrayed by Mads Mikkelsen. You can see a half-dozen of those early ideas at TVOM. Which would you have chosen?  


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Defying the Odds

This is Amanda Diesen and Todd Krieg, who used to ride dirt bikes professionally, but now he has a different set of wheels. After doctors told him it would be "nearly impossible" for him to conceive a child naturally, they made this image to announce that Amanda is pregnant. And another to let everyone know it's a boy!



The two will be getting married soon, and are in the running for a dream wedding giveaway. You can read their story here. -via reddit

See more about baby and kids at NeatoBambino

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Cynthia: John Lennon's First Wife

Neatorama presents a guest post from actor, comedian, and voiceover artist Eddie Deezen. Visit Eddie at his website or at Facebook.

Most people know of John Lennon's famous marriage to Yoko Ono, but many do not know of Cynthia Powell, the first wife and first great love of John Lennon's life. She was conservative, proper, polite, and addressed her elders as "Sir" and "Ma'am." He was rebellious, moody, impolite, incorrigible, and he probably never called anybody "Sir" or "Ma'am" in his entire life.

If ever there was a case of opposites attracting, it was the case when a teenage John Lennon lost his heart to Cynthia Powell.

The two met at the Liverpool College of Art. Cynthia Powell was actually a year older than John, being 18 during the 1957 school term, while John had just turned 17. (John was to marry his second wife, Yoko Ono, later, in 1969, with Yoko being a full seven years John's senior. Apparently, John loved "older women").

The truth is, John Lennon was a total washout at the time and, having nowhere else to go, he somehow had managed to get an invitation to be a part of the city's art school. ("Surely on the road to failure" read one of John's contemporary school teacher's reports).

John would lumber into their drawing class wearing a long tweed coat and skin-tight pants, his long hair slicked back a la Elvis with oily grease, squinting in a near-blind state until he hesitantly donned his thick glasses (which he seldom did in public).



Cynthia first noticed John's rude, boorish behavior in class, as he would ask to "borrow" her pencils, rulers, and brushes, and would conveniently forget to ever return them. John would stand around before classes, telling dirty jokes with his cronies, as Cynthia would enter. "Shhh, quiet," he would say sarcastically, "No dirty talk, it's miss Powell."

She was repelled by the loud-mouthed Lennon, but one day, as she watched the obnoxious character with disgust, she saw a fellow female student stroking John's hair as he sat next to her. Cynthia realized, to her horror, that the repulsion she felt was actually jealousy.

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The Inside Story of Wayne's World's Most Unintentionally Complicated Gag

When the movie Wayne's World was in theaters in 1992, I saw it at least twice. Since then, I've only caught it in bits and pieces on TV, so I had no idea that the film's most memorable gag had been changed -forever. When Wayne goes to a guitar store to try out the instruments, he starts to play "Stairway to Heaven," but is directed to a sign prohibiting the song. By then, I'd heard ten years of requests for the song as a deejay, so I was tickled silly by the scene. But if you were to watch the movie on home video, or even in re-release, this is the scene you see.  

(YouTube link)

Who would have thought that Wayne was trying to play "Stairway to Heaven"? Those are just some random notes! But there's a reason behind the change.

Watching Wayne’s World on VHS as a kid, I remember being baffled by this joke. A million monkeys on a million electric guitars couldn’t come up with a riff that sounds less like "Stairway to Heaven." So was the gag that the employee just assumed Wayne was going to start playing "Stairway"? Or that Wayne was such a bad guitarist that that jangly riff was as close to "Stairway" as he could get?

It was only later that I discovered the movie originally included a much more recognizable version of the song—but only in the original cut.

Blame Led Zeppelin. The band and Warner Music Group wanted to charge the film production $100,000 for the few notes Mike Myers played in the original movie. Read the story of "No Stairway. Denied!" at GQ.


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Where to Find Cheap Valentines Day Meals

It's Valentines Day, and couples will be flooding restaurants tonight for the start of a romantic date. And nothing says love like scoring a thrifty two-for-one deal. Yeah, right. Well, married couples know that when one saves money, the other saves money, too, so you might want to be aware of the special deals that are available today. For example,    

If you go into Qdoba on Valentine’s Day you can get a free entrée when you order one entrée. There is a catch. In order to get this offer, you have to kiss someone at the register. Also, to be on the safe side, you should probably kiss your significant other (or at least someone you know).

I wonder if kissing one's mother or child counts. Check out a list of Valentines Day restaurant deals from Red Robin, Papa John's, Hooters, and more at Uproxx.

(Image credit: Anthony92931)

We dish up more neat food posts at the Neatolicious blog

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Mia Wins Hearts at the Agility Course

Mia knows the agility course, and she's got plenty of speed and agility. But Mia is a beagle, and is therefore both happy and distractible. She delighted the audience at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.

(Facebook link)

Don't be a beagle, don't be a beagle!

That's a good dog. To see how it is supposed to be done, watch Tex, the 2015 winner. -via Metafilter

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

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Love Affairs and Differential Equations

In 1988, Steven Strogatz of Harvard University looked at a pair of star-crossed lovers to illustrate a math concept, "coupled ordinary differential equations." That sounds complicated, but the way he explained it with an example, even I can understand.

Romeo is in love with Juliet, but in our version of this story, Romeo is a fickle lover. The more Juliet loves him, the more he begins to dislike her. But when she loses interest, his feelings for her warm up. She, on the other hand, tends to echo him: her love grows when he loves her, and turns to hate when he hates her.

Then there's a math formula, but you can see where this is going, as if it were a movie.  

The sad outcome of their affair is, of course, a never ending cycle of love and hate; their governing equations are those of a simple harmonic oscillator. At least they manage to achieve simultaneous love one-quarter of the time.

Does that remind you of anyone you know? The original paper is here. The equation can be found in various forms in math departments all across academia. -via Cliff Pickover


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French Shepherds on Stilts

The French region of Landes was once marshy and soft, with terrain that was hard to cultivate and almost impossible to build roads on. The people who lived there were relatively poor, but made do with livestock and stilts. Learning to use stilts at an early age, they used them to cover a lot of territory quickly, looking after their sheep. Even the women walked on stilts. As word spread around the country, the stiltwalkers didn't mind showing off for tourists, or even royalty. Landes is much drier now, but the tradition of stilt walking lives on in illustrations and photographs you can see at Messy Nessy Chic. 


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When It's Just The Dudes At Home

(YouTube link)

Fathers and babies left unsupervised will find something weird and fun to do. Adam Ballard and his infant son Miles show off some killer dance moves to the Michael Jackson song "Beat It." Miles does the Moonwalk made famous in "Billie Jean" and the impossible lean from "Smooth Criminal." He also does air guitar to Eddie Van Halen's solo. There's some nice shuffling and other fancy footwork going on here, too. -via Tastefully Offensive

See more about baby and kids at NeatoBambino

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Where The

The following is an article from The Annals of Improbable Research, now in all-pdf form. Get a subscription now for only $25 a year!

(Image credit: Flickr user Stuart Caie)

by Marc Abrahams, Improbable Research staff

‘The’ has its place. That, more or less, is the theme of Glenda Browne’s treatise called “The Definite  Article: Acknowledging ‘The’ in Index Entries.”1

The ‘The’ article appears in The Indexer, the information- and  fun-packed publication for professional  indexers everywhere. The Indexer has its own index, which includes an entry for ‘Browne, Glenda.’

Brown characterizes herself as an Australian freelance indexer. Her study is a four-page-long guide for the ‘The’-perplexed. It explains that: “If ‘The’ exists in a name or title, it should exist in the index entry for that name or title. And if it exists in the index entry, it should be taken into account when sorting the entries.”

The problem is widespread, and although there are rules (at  least three different -- and differing-- official sets of rules), indexers often go their own ways. Browne gives examples.

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When Heart Transplant Patients Were Celebrities

 

The first successful human heart transplant took place in South Africa on on December 3, 1967. The patient, 55-year-old Louis Washkansky, lived only 18 days afterward, but became a part of history. In the year that followed, over 100 heart transplants took place in several nations. Each of those surgeries was groundbreaking, and the patients as well as the doctors became media sensations. Frederick West (pictured) became the first heart transplant recipient in Britain, followed that same week by two such surgeries in the U.S.

West’s operation was an object of national obsession in Britain, and it kicked off an unprecedented relationship between the media and the medical world, as historian Ayesha Nathoo meticulously chronicled in her book Hearts Exposed: Transplants and the Media in 1960s Britain. Photographers and reporters mobbed the hospital; one member of the operation team described a street clogged with arc lights and so many people “the whole thing looked like a royal wedding being watched”.

The hospital went to extraordinary lengths to accommodate the press. They held a hastily assembled press conference where attendees fought and shoved each other, and reporters were admitted into their halls. “As West was recovering,” wrote Nathoo, “photographers and film crews were allowed right inside the hospital space, turning the patient ward into a television studio and bringing the hospital world into public view.” In addition to posing with smiling nurses, West was photographed winking for the camera and even filmed playing chess.

Sadly, the early patient celebrities did not live long, and the number of transplants plunged until the surgery and aftercare was refined. Read about those early heart transplants at Atlas Obscura.

This article is part of Atlas Obscura's Hearts Week.


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Weird Valentine Dinner from 1971

What you see here is a Valentine dinner from the 1971 booklet 401 Party and Holiday Ideas from Alcoa. The recipes are about what you'd expect from a marketing company of the era. What is presented between the silverware is Jellied Ham Salad, which contains lemon-flavored gelatin, vinegar, mayonnaise, pimiento, horseradish, ham, and other abominations. You can see the recipe for the salad and the instructions for making your own heart-shaped cake pan and cake stand out of aluminum foil at Granny Pantries. The blog, which has the tagline "A place to appreciate the horrors of vintage cookbooks," also gives us a Valentine recipe for Two-in-One Valentine Salad, where you serve chicken salad in little hearts made of gelatin and tomato juice. Happy Valentines day! -via Everlasting Blort 

We dish up more neat food posts at the Neatolicious blog

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Ilana Schwartz's Javadoodles



Imagine that you love what you did for a living so much that you go home at night and do more of it outside of your job. Artists are like that. Ilana Schwartz is an animator for several shows on Nickelodoen, but in her spare time she doodles on paper coffee cups.



Her work displays quite a range of styles. These are the paper cups you'd never throw out if you had one! See a collection of Schwartz's cups at TVOM.   


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Profile for Miss Cellania

  • Member Since 2012/08/04


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