Kaye Effect: Jumping Liquids.

Here's a weird behavior of complex liquids, called the Kaye Effect [wiki], named after British engineer Arthur Kaye, who first discovered it in 1963. When a think thin stream of viscous fluid is poured onto a surface, a stream of jumping liquid can be seen!

Hit play or go to Link [YouTube] - via Cool Stuff


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It's really the height that is critical...after watching the video we notice that the height that they were using was about 20 cm. It's also important to have a steady stream. We were able to get the Kaye effect at the kitchen table on a dirty plate, and then slanting one plate we were able to create the continuous one. Hope that helps...Long live Kaye Effect!
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Hi there, i´m trying over and over again... but i don´t get the results... can anyone tell me what kind of surface do we need to try this?

Some kind of "moving-surface"?
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I tried this in the shower with my girlfriends shampoo for over 10 minutes...when she walked in and saw what I was doing she wasn't amused with it and I was promptly robbed of my "Kaye Experimenting with Shampoo in the Shower" moment. :(
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