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Eerie Conspiracy Theories Which Are Actually True

Conspiracy theories usually sound so insane only a fool would actually believe in them, and while they make good subject matter for movies and TV shows they're not normally taken seriously in real life.

Theories state pharmaceutical co.s are making people sick for profit and the U.S. government stole dead babies so they could conduct experiments on them, which sound like plots for episodes of a sci-fi themed TV show.

But, like many urban myths, there's a kernel of truth hidden in these theories, and the facts are sometimes more out there than the fiction.

Big Pharma has been blamed for causing addiction to opioids and selling cut-rate drugs to poor people, but it turns out one rumor was true- Bayer's blood clotting drug made it easier to transmit HIV, and they knowingly sold the tainted drug just to make a profit.

Instead of destroying the drug after discovering this HIV transmission problem they sold it to Latin American and Asian countries, causing at least 100 people in Hong Kong and Taiwan to contract AIDS.

And as for the U.S. government stealing babies- it was all because of one Dr. Willard Libby, who wanted to study "the absorption of strontium-90 in human tissue, primarily bone".

Dr. Libby decided dead bodies would make the perfect test subjects, since the living don't like it when their bones are removed during testing, so around 1955 he initiated a dead baby collection program dubbed Project Sunshine.

From around 1957 to 1978 tests were conducted in secret on recently deceased babies sent to labs in the UK and US, and yet Dr. Libby won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1960.

Read 5 Eerie Conspiracies Theorists Were Right About All Along here (contains NSFW language)


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