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It was the Yolkster. He's just a shell of a man, though. He's not a hardened criminal, yet, since that yolk was still runny. There is a sunnyside about this crime though. His brains weren't scrambled during the getaway even though the cops did see the whites of his eyes. They expect to capture the Yolkster soon before he becomes a hardboiled criminal...
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It was the Yolkster. He's just a shell of a man, though. He's not a hardened criminal, yet, since that yolk was still runny. There is a sunnyside about this crime though. His brains weren't scrambled during the getaway even though the cops did see the whites of his eyes. They expect to capture the Yolkster soon before he becomes a hardboiled criminal...
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Ironically, you're reminiscing about the NEW meaning of the word, which arose out of people misunderstanding and misapplying the term.

Dating back to the 60's, the term originally meant:
"creatively overcoming and circumventing limitations of programming systems"

"life hacks" is a fairly minor extension of the term. While using it to mean a computer criminals is completely wrong, no matter how "sick" you may be of its correct and proper usage.
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This is what happens when protocol is ignored. Standard coffee safety protocol dictates that not a creature should be stirring, not even a mouse.
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Honestly, my kids begged me to join them on Facebook (when they were younger), so I made a "non-professional" account for family and friends. Now they are disappointed that I don't see the stuff they post on Facebook, just like I am disappointed they don't read Neatorama. Different worlds, I guess, each with limited time.
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Young kids quite quickly pick up some of the basic aspects of things like graph theory, set theory, and even abstract algebra in the right contexts. I've seen multiple mathematicians speculate that teaching such topics more and at much younger ages could raise both kids interests in math and their long term prospects in pure math. The issue is that for 99% of people these math subjects have no direct practical use (still great mental exercises in multiple ways though), and some efforts to teach such subjects in the past did so at the expense of more practical arithmetic and applied math that people need in today's world. While I'm all for kids exploring topics for sake of interests or to help improve abstract thinking, the basics still need to be covered.

But with the way math is taught in most schools now, the closest most get to pure math is a proof-centric geometry course (which some like much more than a cookbook algebra course), and those that trying to go more heavily into math in university hit a wall with an abstract algebra course that weeds out a large number of people from math programs.
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  • Member Since 2012/07/17


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