Using Sand To Cast A Hexagonal Pewter Stool

(Video Link)

Metal casting can involve a lot of expensive equipment, scorching heat and a lot of know-how, or you can simply do what artist Max Lamb does and bring your supplies to the local beach in Cornwall, England and cast stuff in the sand.

Max uses primitive sand casting techniques, essentially making a mold by digging out the shape in sand then pouring molten pewter into the sand mold to get his finished product, which has a shape and texture co-created by Nature.

His simple, whimsical works hearken back to a time when the end result didn’t have to look like it was computer generated, and casting in metal wasn’t seen as an archaic discipline.

Via Beautiful/Decay


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I kept thinking how amazed I was that he was allowed to make a big production like that. Pull out a camera on a beach around here and they'll be hassling you for permits within 5 minutes. I wonder if he had one.

Cool, though.
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Other kinds of metal casting can be done with rather cheap equipment, especially if you get most of it used or free from the curb. There are plans and examples around of using propane and various types of re-purposed blowers with a little hardware to make a heat source for melting aluminum, although some can get it hot enough for iron. You just need a little specialty cement and insulator from a typical hardware store to make the furnace. The expensive part ends up being the fuel, although I once saw someone made their furnace to run off of discarded oil. Like other things, comes down to needing time and space for it if you want to do it on the cheap though.
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Check out Twaggies' very funny clip:

Tech Fails - Twaggies by Twaggies
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