Be Cautious When Using Free Airport Wi-Fi

Last year Google began offering free WiFi in 47 American airports.  Other airports have added this feature to accommodate the needs of business travelers.  Here's a reminder that connecting to WiFi may open your laptop to strangers:

I was recently at New York’s JFK airport in the JetBlue terminal, where they have prominent signs offering free wi-fi, courtesy of the airline. But when I went to connect, I noticed that several options were available including one labeled “default” and another labeled “JetBlue free hotspot.” It turns out that the former was the actual free hotspot and the latter was the honeypot. What tipped me off was that the “JetBlue free hotspot” was labeled in my Mac OS X “Airport” (i.e. wi-fi) menu as a “Computer-to-Computer network...”  If you connect to this network on an imperfectly protected Windows laptop, this hacker will have access to your data from his own computer.

More at the link.  The same principle would of course apply at non-airport facilities such as dining establishments. Link

(Image credit: Leah Jaako)


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this bit amused me

"If you connect to this network on an imperfectly protected Windows laptop, this hacker will have access to your data from his own computer."

Are Mac's immune to a standard CIFS browse attempt now then ?
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MrMichael spotted it perfectly, mostly #3. If you have minimum computer skills to use a wifi, you should notice that you're not connecting "to the internet" in a connection like this one that was described quite easily.

Naming your wifi "default" (and let it open!) isn't the most clever thing either.
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