Schill MacGuffin's Comments

I'd always assumed the rationale wasn't about ill effects on the patient, so much as wanting to head off the development of bacterial resistance -- wanting to be thorough in killing off bacterial that might have only been weakened, and even if they didn't induce a relapse, might multiply and spread to give a worse infection to the next person.
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It was a long time before I knew about the model's disease, but from my childhood I'd always interpreted the pose as the girl dragging herself, and saw it as less "serene" than as a pose of yearning or desperation.
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It's probably true that it could have left if it wanted, but it's not inconceivable that it came in from a higher level and couldn't get back up to it due to interior clutter.
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The article is really unclear about how positional awareness is cued. It specifically discusses the ability to navigate blind, and refers to "compass cells", but the experiments seem to have focused solely on visual input.
The importance of inertial cues is is why I've typically found "first person shooter" and dogfighting computer games frustrating. I can function purely visually to some extent, but without the sensation of actually turning to reinforce it, my mental map is weak, and I'm prone to go in virtual circles.
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I've had pretty good luck with simply roasting the bird face down in the pan, instead of the traditional pose of laying it on its back. I believe this encourages the natural juices to collect in the breast instead of dripping to the low-meat back and leaking out. It certainly requires minimal effort for a good return, though it might make for a less photogenically crispy-skinned bird. I've never really valued the holiday "photo op" very much, and typically cut at least half the meat off of the bird for easy serving before before bringing it out to the table.
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I actually find this more interesting, and certainly more dramatic, than the traditional version -- That the Wampanoag showed up thinking they were meeting an attack, and got drawn into the party is like a 1600s version of the World War I Christmas truce.
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It sounds to me like Brody is saying "Hello", perhaps because that's what he thinks Zora is saying.
I actually was involved in a similar exchange myself. My then-girlfriend was staying with me in my apartment, and had brought her cats. One of them had the habit of walking around with a yarn toy in her mouth at night, "calling" to non-existent babies (I don't think this is uncommon for female cats). Her call sounded an awful lot like "Hello!", and I woke up in a daze thinking someone was at the door at 3:00AM. After a few exchanged greetings, I eventually came to my senses and realized who I was talking to.
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I've no idea how Chinese criminal law operates, but it seems odd that this would come under "attempted murder". Nobody seems to have actually gotten off their butts to make an actual attempt. In the US it seems more like it would be classed as "conspiracy to commit murder".
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On a family vacation to upstate New York many years ago, we stopped at a roadside site near Fort Ticonderoga. It was on the route by which the Continental army had approached the fort, and had a sizeable restored outhouse -- a three-holer -- where it was said that Ethan Allen, Benedict Arnold, and an aid had sat, looking out over a valley, and strategized about how the Fort would be taken and its guns moved out for use.So, yes, apparently a lot of important business was conducted that way.
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The above Himmler photo is pretty well-known, and I've always seen it identified as depicting Himmler observing Soviet prisoners soon after the Barbarossa invasion. The shabby, temporary-looking barbed wire fence stapled to a tree would make sense in that context, as the Germans took huge numbers of prisoners -- well-beyond what they'd made any provision for -- and enormous numbers of them died of starvation and exposure in shelterless temporary holding pens.
And yet -- looking at the picture closely, I see that there are buildings in the background, and the prisoners seem to be in an odd variety of outfits, including several civilian hats. I'm not sure what to make of that, as civilian and military prisoners were generally not mixed, and I'm not sure why any military prisoners would be wearing such garb. The determined young man facing down Himmler is wearing a military hat, but one that a number of nations wore variations of (a German is wearing a similar one behind and to the left of Himmler). It's similar enough to the one Greasley is wearing in his picture, that I can't rule out it being the same.
So the question would be whether Himmler ever visited Freiwaldau -- apparently with an entourage including not only SS officers, but regular army (to Himmler's left - I believe a lieutenant or captain, based on his insignia) and Luftwaffe (the officer in the back, near the fence, can't make out his rank) as well. The SS officer behind Himmler to his right wears the collar emblems of a Gruppenf├╝hrer (Lieutenant General), so he may well be identifiable to help further pin down the location of the photo.
So I'm uncertain whether it might be Greasley. I do think it's possible that even if it wasn't, Greasley might conceivably have latched onto the idea that it was, and even sincerely believed it by the time he was 89.
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It's a bit extreme to assert that if it had hit the Earth it would have decimated a city. First there would have been something like a 70% chance of hit landing on an ocean. If it did hit land, there'd be something like a one-third chance of it hitting sparsely inhabited desert, and probably another third or more of it landing in likewise sparsely inhabited jungle, tundra, or wilderness like Siberia.
I doubt a impact of "30x Hiroshima" would generate a destructive Tsunami if it did land at sea, since it'd likely be exploding on-or-above the surface instead of creating an underwater landslide. It's also not clear what the composition of this thing was -- a lot of damage estimates from asteroids are based on the "worst case" of a solid nickel-iron chunk, while most such objects are stony or even more loosely composed, like balls of boulders and gravel. Objects like that would tend to break up in the upper atmosphere, and while they might do some significant damage on the ground (a'la Tunguska), it's a lot less damage than a solid projectile would do.
So, 2019 OK actually hitting the Earth wouldn't have been a good thing, But it would still have been more likely not to hurt anyone than to wipe out a city.
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Why spend time going through them, when you can tell the computer exactly what you want, in plain English?
Because sometimes it's not easy to do that without seeing what your options are, or because you're not especially articulate?
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Profile for Schill MacGuffin

  • Member Since 2014/02/15


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