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The History of the Conversation Heart

The chalky little candy hearts that say something sweet like “kiss me” or incomprehensible like “me too” are ubiquitous this time of year. You’ve seen them all of your life, but did you ever wonder when they became a thing?

The story of conversation hearts began in 1847, when a Boston pharmacist named Oliver Chase longed for a way to get in on the apothecary lozenge craze. Lozenges were quickly gaining steam as the medicine conveyance of choice, and were also popular remedies for sore throats and bad breath. But making lozenges was complicated and time-consuming—the process involved a mortar and pestle, kneading dough, rolling it out, and cutting it into discs that would eventually become lozenges.

There had to be a better way, and Oliver came up with it. Inspired by the new wave of gadgets and tools that hit America as it industrialized, he invented a machine that rolled lozenge dough and pressed wafers into perfect discs. Oliver had inadvertently created America’s first candy-making machine, and before long, he had abandoned his pharmacy business to crank out miles of what would become New England Confectionery Company (NECCO) wafers.

The candy was just the first step. The message came later, and the heart shape even further in the story, which you can read at mental_floss.

We dish up more neat food posts at the Neatolicious blog

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