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Celebrity Home Libraries



Judy Berman of Flavorwire rounded up photographs of luxurious libraries in the homes of celebrities, such as Diane Keaton's, which is pictured above. Karl Lagerfeld's is astoundingly packed from floor to ceiling (and then some) with books.

Link | Photo: Calfinder

Actually, vonskippy, the dictionary defines a "library" as - A place in which literary and artistic materials, such as books, periodicals, newspapers, pamphlets, prints, records, and tapes, are kept for reading, reference, or lending.
This does not mean -
A place in which ONLY literary and artistic materials, such as books, periodicals, newspapers, pamphlets, prints, records, and tapes, are kept for reading, reference, or lending.
So, by definition, any room where you keep reading / reference material - even the smallest amount of reading / reference material - can be called a library. Even a room with NO bookshelves. Just as long as the PURPOSE of that room [or one of its primary purposes] is to house these reference materials.
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If you hate books Dashell, just say so, but as a BOOKLOVER I can tell you a measly shelf or three in your house doesn't mean you have a LIBRARY. I have more books in our upstairs bathroom then some of those so called "celebrity library's" do (and of course we have a REAL Library too).
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Hey hey! Let's calm down the vitriolic rhetoric a moment and I think we can all find common ground in the fact that the article at the link above, featuring what are libraries or what are not, is pretty weak and uninteresting and beneath the standards of quality we usually expect from Neatorama.
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@vonskippy

it would seem ill-advised to accuse anybody who goes by "dashell hammet" of not liking books. his instinct to look up a definition of the word in question is also very bookish.

alos, karl lagerfeld is a very interesting person, in so many ways.
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Yeah, there's a difference between a "study" and a "library". Most of those looked like part of the décor rather than books they've read.

Kinda like when you visit a lawyer's office. The books are mostly for show, occasionally for use.
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@vonskippy
Actually, I love books.
I am sorry if it seemed like I was attacking you. I wasn't. I only had hoped to illuminate to all philomaths that even a modest space in a tiny home could be called a library.
It is the intent not the number of shelves that makes a room a library.
Thank you, @c0ldfish.
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Agggh Karl Lagerfeld's looks like it's got tons of great stuff but stacked VERTICALLY? You can't peruse! You have to take a whole pile down unless the thing you want is on top.
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You can tell which of these are 'decorative' libraries by the lack of tables, comfortable furniture, and books strewn about. Diane Keaton's looks like it was built specifically to be photographed for home magazines.
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Yeah, and encyclopedia collections? What a waste of money. They are so ridiculously expensive and quickly become redundant. Nobody reads them either. I don't think they should count as part of a library unless they are accompanied by many other books.
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I was reading in a book that when shelves of a certain texture touch the covers of books the books themselves take on the properties of the wood. This has been scientifically proven using a parabolic strut attached to the electrical outlet. Once the two are combined a weird thing happens, Albert Einstein spoke of this, a spooky thing causing the two, the book and wood, actually become one in the universe. It is a very hard thing to see but if you look closely when you place a book on a shelf you will actually see a spark that travels the length of the books spine. This electrical spark actually contains all the information and can be readily captured and read. It really is a thing all librarians can attest to. Have you ever seen a librarians hair, what a mess! This is caused by the interaction of the skin and wood.
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