Make Ready to Fail!

Ben Franklin's Pennsylvania Gazette , like any good eighteenth-century document, makes liberal use of the "long s" -- the one that looks like an f -- amusingly in this case. The difference between a long s and an f is that the cross-stroke doesn't go all the way through.


...all in the name of the purfuit of happinefs!

(initial and medial s written as a long s (f) but final s looks like our modern s)
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I mashed up an antique map from 1738 and rewrote the title to be: "A New Map of the Terraqueous Globe : according to the the Ancient discoveries and most general Divisions of Geospatial Art" using the long S. So Geosfatial = Geospatial. In the process of remixing the map I realized 18th century typography is not easy to replicate!
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They just had different hyphenation conventions than we do. Also paper was at a premium, so they often hypnenated in whatever way they felt would save the most space.
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