Charcoal Cheese Is Made of (Guess What) Charcoal

(Photo: Manor Farm Shop)

It's not just a name referring to the color. The Michael Lee Fine Cheeses Company in West Yorkshire, UK, really makes cheese made with charcoal. The company describes it as a "creamy, mature cheddar blended with charcoal." It won the Best New Idea award at the 2014 Farm Shop & Deli Show.

Amy Birkin, a representative of the company, told the Sleaford Target that it wanted to make a black cheese to mark the thirtieth anniversary of the 1984 miners' strike in Britain.

-via Weird Universe


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Peeps Versus A Red Hot Ball Of Nickel

(Video Link)

Sugary snacks have been an Easter tradition ever since a human-sized rabbit crawled out of a cave and laid a giant pink chocolate egg, or something like that, and one of the most iconic Easter snacks are Peeps- those marshmallow birdies and bunnies that look cute and taste like a giant pile of sugary fluff.

Peeps are very colorful, and therefore fun to watch meet a fiery end, whether blowing up in a microwave or expanding to epic proportions in a vacuum chamber, but this year Peeps are meeting their end in a hot new way- death by red hot ball of nickel.

If you can't eat them, turn them into a giant molten pile of goo!

-Via Geekosystem


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Sad Desk Lunch

When you feel like the leftovers you took to the office for lunch aren’t the greatest, turn to the blog Sad Desk Lunch and see what other office workers are eating. It might make you feel better. Or it might make you feel worse, in which case, just snap a picture and send it in.

The again, you might be feeling pretty good about your work lunch, but you see that someone else, eating the very same thing, submitted it because they considered it sad. And it is, but not because the food is bad.

Sad Desk Lunch isn’t about how great your lunch is. And it’s not about how crappy your lunch is either. It’s about the fact you eat your lunch at your desk during your lunch break where you could roam free. Step outside. Breathe a little. Americans have a tendency never to take their lunch break and sit around, munch on their sandwich or carefully homemade bento box, at their desk.

-via Nag on the Lake


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This Pizza Cake Could Become a Reality

Boston Pizza, a Canada-based pizzeria company, is holding an online contest offering to produce one of several innovations that the company has developed. You can view the site here, which is currently loading slowly. Pictured above is one of the popular options available for voting: a pizza layer cake. This is something that we obviously need, so please throw your support and votes behind it.

You could also plausibly vote for the pizza slicer powered by a 4-stroke gasoline engine.

Or the pizza shirt pocket.

Or a lockable pizza security case to protect your pizza from thieving family members or co-workers, such as a certain managing editor who shall remain nameless.

-via Brand Eating


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Creepy Easter Cakes

There are plenty of different ways to sculpt the figure of a bunny, and they are all used for Easter cakes. But not all of those cakes come out looking like a nice, playful, innocent spring harbinger. In fact, there are plenty of horribly decorated bunny cakes (and a chick and a lamb) in this Easter cake post at Cake Wrecks. And there are even more here.


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Cheap Wine Reviewed By An Irish Brewmaster

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People who choose to drink cheap wines like Boone's Farm and Franzia typically do so for one reason- the price. They’re not picky about the flavor notes, or the aftertaste, or the aroma- cheap wine drinkers want to get their buzz on without spending too much money, and they don't really care about reviews good or bad.

However, maybe the companies that make these cheap wines will appreciate some input from an Irish brewmaster named Damian McConn, a guy who enjoys flavor notes and aromas and such.

Damian share his reviews of some of the most popular cheap wines in this BuzzFeed presents video, and needless to say he is not impressed!

-Via Stuff I Stole From The Internet


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Make Your Own Marshmallow Peeps

Sure, it’s easier to buy marshmallow Peeps at the store, but you might not see them for a long time after Easter. The advantages of making your own are that you control the color and the flavor, and what time of year you can have them. Plus, you’ll know exactly how fresh they are. And just imagine how impressed your co-workers and mother-in-law will be (especially if you are artistically-inclined)! Molly Yeh has the complete recipe at Food 52.  -via The Week

(Image credit: Molly Yeh)


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Dr. Seuss Peeps

Peeps are in season and there’s no bag limit, so eat as many as you can. 2 years ago, to mark the birthday of Dr. Seuss, Michelle Clausen of Sugar Swings made these Peeps decorated with characters from his books.

-via Between the Pages


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Cadbury Creme Egg Toad-in-a-Hole

Fry an egg inside a hole cut into a slice of bread. The result looks something like this. Some people call this dish an “egg in a basket,” a “one-eyed jack,” or a “bird in a nest.” But I was raised in the South, where we learn to speak English properly, so I call it a “toad-in-a-hole.”

Here’s a great variation for Easter. Jessie Oleson Moore made this sweet version by chilling a Cadbury Creme Egg, then frying it in a slice of pound cake. What a brilliant idea!


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Ramen Chicken Wings


(Photo: Hot Sauce and Panko)

Hot Sauce and Panko, an eatery in the Richmond district of San Francisco, has a menu that doesn’t make any sense but also makes total sense.

(Note that the menu link above is NSFW for nudity, which is something that I never thought that I’d have to say about a restaurant menu page. IHOP certainly does not have this problem.)

At Hot Sauce and Panko, you can eat chicken wings in a variety of flavors, such as Kentucky bourbon/sorghum teriyaki and sriracha caramel. There are several different waffle sandwiches, including macaroni and cheese with Black Forest ham and chili cheese fries.

But the grand prize for culinary originality must go to the ramen-coated chicken wings. I have no information to offer about them, except that I really want to eat some.

-via Foodiggity


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Take a Bite out of These Shark Pancakes

It's several months until Shark Week, but that hasn't stopped master pancake artist Nathan Shields from dishing up this meaty breakfast for his kids. I'm especially impressed with his shading on the Hammerhead and the Great White. They look quite realistic.

If you love Shields' work as much as we do, be sure to check out his recent video interview about his work.


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Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Egg Rolls

You had my curiosity at "peanut butter." But you got my full attention at "chocolate chip cookie dough." Melanie of Melanie Makes fried these sweet confections. She made them by wrapping balls of cookie dough in wonton wrappers, then deep frying them. She sprinkled them with powdered sugar and served them with a chocolate ganache. Melanie also recommends ice cream, which is always a great idea.

-via Tasteologie


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The Perfect Cake for Your Last Day At Work

Last week was imgur user TryAnotherPiece's coworker's last day at work - so everyone pitched in to get a cake that's worthy of the departure. The "you are dead to us" message never looked so delicious!


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KFC Prom Corsage

(YouTube link)

How romantic! He remembered she likes original recipe! Believe it or not, KFC has corsages just in time for your prom. Order yours today! The corsage is actually from Nanz & Kraft Florists of Louisville. The small print says:

NOTE: Chicken not included (duh.). Each corsage kit includes a $5 KFC gift check, so you can customize your corsage with Original Recipe, Extra Crispy or Kentucky Grilled Chicken. Whichever best matches her dress. Local corsages will have fresh baby's breath and out-of-town corsages will have silk baby's breath.

So would you prefer original recipe or extra crispy on your wrist for prom? If you’re feeling really adventurous, you might even try a piece with barbecue sauce! -via Uproxx


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Deep Fried Cadbury Creme Eggs

Kirbie writes that her experimental dessert tastes "like a fried dough ball of goodness with chocolate and a melted creme center." So it would be an awesome treat for Easter. She made them by wrapping them in canned pizza dough and then deep frying them in a pan of oil. It's important to time the frying just right so that the chocolate is melted but not disintegrated.

-via Tasteologie


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What Does "Organic" Mean?

(Image credit: Alanthebox)

From the sticker on your banana to the future of farming, we’re breaking down the definition of “organic” into bite-size pieces.

According to the Organic Trade Association, organic foods have become a $20 billion industry. And a quick scan of the grocery store aisles seems to confirm that. But the more people buy into it, the bigger the question becomes: What exactly does “organic” mean?

What’s in a Name?

You’ve probably noticed by now that organic products tend to be pricey. That’s partially because federal certification costs money, and partially because the right to use the word “organic” requires meeting the USDA standards that were set in 2002. Even imported foods have to be up to government snuff before they can be called organic.

(Image credit: David Luther Thomas)

The USDA rules are pretty stringent. To be certified as organic, farmers can’t use synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, or hormones for three full years before applying. Further, any animals they have must be raised on organic foods. Genetically modified crops are a no-no, as are farming practices that cause high levels of pollution. Even the shipping and processing procedures are monitored. Organic foods have to be kept separate from non-organics until they arrive in the grocery store.

It’s up to the non-governmental agencies that are certified by the USDA to determine whether or not a product gets to use the organic label. They monitor every step of the system, and in the end, they’re the ones who slap that big “O” on the finished product.

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This Is a Deviled Ostrich Egg

The boyfriend of Instructables member Rachel bought an ostrich egg. What should you do with such an unusual food? Make something fancy, of course! They boiled and deviled it. You can view more photos here.


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The Toxic History of Soda Pop

You probably know people who drink soda pop all day long, and they may even tell you they’re “addicted” to it. You might be one of those people yourself. In the modern age, we can find out all the ingredients in what we drink, and make our decisions accordingly. We all know those ingredients are not necessarily good for us. But once upon a time, soda pop was billed as a health tonic and there were often things in there that were far worse than sugar and carbonated water. Tristan Donovan, the author of Fizz: How Soda Shook Up the World, tells us about early soda drinks.

Besides booze, sodas of the 19th century also incorporated drugs with much stronger side effects, including ingredients now known as narcotics. Prior to the Pure Food & Drug Act of 1906, there were few legal restrictions on what could be put into soda-fountain beverages. Many customers came to soda fountains early in the morning to get a refreshing and “healthy” beverage to start their day off right: Terms like “bracer” and “pick-me-up” referred to the physical and mental stimulation sodas could provide, whether from caffeine or other addictive substances.

Pharmacists were soon making soda mixtures with stronger drugs known as “nervines,” a category that included strychnine, cannabis, morphine, opium, heroin, and a new miracle compound called cocaine, which was first isolated in 1855. “Cocaine was a wonder drug at the time when it was first discovered,” Donovan explains. “It was seen as this marvelous medicine that could do you no harm. Ingredients like cocaine or kola nuts or phosphoric acid were all viewed as something that really gave you an edge.

“Recipes I’ve seen suggest it was about 0.01 grams of cocaine used in fountain sodas. That’s about a tenth of a line of coke,” he says. “It’s hard to be sure, but I don’t think it would’ve given people a massive high. It would definitely be enough to have some kind of effect, probably stronger than coffee.” While the dosages were small, they were certainly habit-forming, and soda fountains stood to profit from such consistent customers.

That’s just part of the history of soda. How did they develop fizzy water in the first place? How did we eventually lose the drugs? And why did some sodas stick around while others faded? Learn the history of soda at Collectors Weekly.


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Sriracha Factory In California Declared Public Nuisance

(Image Via AP)

In the last decade Sriracha has gone from that sauce you see on the table at Asian restaurants to a spicy staple in many homes, rivaling the fame enjoyed by spicy celebrities Tapatio and Cholula. People like Sriracha so much that Lay's even made Sriracha flavored chips, although their recipe could have used a little more Sriracha.

Recently, a Sriracha factory in Irwindale, California was declared a public nuisance by the South Coast Air Quality Management District after nearby residents complained of burning eyes and throats due to the odor emanating from the factory.

So, is the spice going to disappear from our lives? Huy Fong Foods, makers of Sriracha, have until June 1st to install carbon filters in their factory or it's bye-bye red rooster sauce.

-Via Gawker


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Wilhelm Rodriguez's Portrait Pizzas

Wilhelm Rodriguez is an artist who can fill your belly with awesome art. He's a chef at Papa's Pizza in Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico. He can create highly realistic portraits of people both real and imaginary. I love this one of Steve Jobs inside the Apple logo! You can view more of Rodriguez's work here.

Peter Griffin from Family Guy

Freddy Krueger from A Nightmare on Elm Street

Sub-Zero from Mortal Kombat


(Video Link)

P.S. Rodriguez is also a performer on the US Pizza team. Watch him dance with the dough in this impressive video. He's a Renaissance man who delivers!

-via Geekologie


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The Alphabet Sandwich Is an A to Z of Foods between 2 Slices of Bread

A few months ago, gastronomical explorer Nick Chipman of Dude Foods created the McEverything: a combination of all 43 sandwiches available at his local McDonald's. More recently, he created a sandwich that has 26 fillings, one for each letter of the English alphabet. Here's what he placed between 2 slices of bread:

Avocado
Bacon
Cheese
Doritos
Egg
Fish sticks
Garlic bread
Ham
Italian sausage patty
Jalapeño peppers
Krispy Kreme doughnut
Lettuce
Macaroni and cheese
Noodles
Onion rings
Pepperoni
Quest blanco dip
Ramen noodles
Spinach
Turkey burger
Usingers bratwurst
Veal Parmesan
Waffle
Xylocarp (coconut)
Yams
Zucchini

There are few English words that begin with the letter X. What were his options? Xena and xylophone come to mind, but neither are traditional food items.

No, Nick went with xylocarp, which is another word for coconut. That was a clever solution!


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Colored Food

Photographer Lawrie Brown presents delicious and wholesome foods with a difference: They are an odd color. In the series Colored Food, you get chicken, ice cream, corn, crackers, cereal, and other dishes. The actual food looks good, and you know how hard it is to make food look good in a photograph. Yet you can’t imagine eating them, just because of the unsesttling and unnatural color.

The Kool-Ade looks pretty good, because we are used to Kool-Ade in weird colors. The pasta looks unappetizing because you can tell it has paint on it instead of sauce. But the rest are just strange. You might get me to eat the sundae, but I’d be expecting that syrup to taste like artificial grape flavor, and that just ruins the experience, no matter what the actual flavor. See the entire series at Brown's website. -via Laughing Squid


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Cheap Beer Map of the United States

LiveScience posted an analysis of Twitter data of tweets sent between June 2012 and May 2013 to find out the beer preference of various states. This one above shows what cheap beer is popular in different regions of the United States. Surprisingly, hipster favorite PBR wasn't listed.

Related: Stories Behind 7 Famouse Beer Logos

View more beer tweet infographics over at LiveScience


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Fat Chance: The War Between Butter and Margarine

The following is an article from the book Uncle John's Absolutely Absorbing Bathroom Reader.

These days, you expect to find both butter and margarine on grocery shelves… but did you know that margarine companies had to fight to get there? This article was written by Jack Mingo.

MARGINAL USE

“Oleomargarine” was a word coined in the late 1860s by a French chemist, Hippolyte Mège-Mouriès. The price of butter had soared, so Napoleon II, expecting shortages because of an anticipated war with Prussia, offered a prize at the Paris World Exhibition in 1866 to anyone who could come up with a cheap, plentiful butter substitute.

Mège-Mouriès did some research and discovered that even starving cows give milk containing milk fat. Since this fat isn’t coming from their food, he reasoned that it must be coming from the cows themselves. Deciding that it must be possible to do the same thing mechanically, he invented a process to render oil from beef fat and combine the oil with milk to form a butter-like spread. He won Napoleon’s prize, but lost the first marketplace skirmish- his margarine factory opened in 1873 near Paris, then had to close when peace unexpectedly broke out and ruined the expected butter shortages.

ACROSS THE OCEAN

Mège-Mouriès’ process, however, found a home in the United States. The U.S. Dairy Company bought the rights to it in 1874 and licensed the process to 15 factories around the country. By 1882, it was making 50,000 pounds of the imitation spread every day. Soon, Armour and other meat-packing houses began producing margarine of their own, using fatty by-products left over from meat processing.




Farmers and butter manufacturers were beginning to get worried by this new product, especially those who made cheaper, lower-grade butter. Margarine was roughly comparable in price, but it was often of better quality.

In 1877 the dairy industry engineered the passage of laws in New York and Maryland requiring that oleomargarine “be marketed, branded, and stamped as such, under penalty of $100 and imprisonment for 30 days.” Even the margarine manufacturers agreed that that these laws were reasonable, and didn’t object when other states followed suit. In the words of a spokesman in 1880, “Of course, this had for a time its effect upon the sale of the product; but as oleomargarine is a pure and wholesome article of food, possessing all the qualities of good dairy butter, the people have overlooked the name and have decided to eat it.”

GOING FOR THE JUGULAR

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Bacon and Sausage Encased Whole Hot Dog & Bun

How do you like your hot dog? Just mustard, relish and sauerkraut isn't enough. Mirko of the German-language food blog Fat and Tasty built this delicious meal (translation) that almost looks too..., uh, good to eat. He began with a hot dog in a bun, which he then wrapped with sausage. Then he encased it a lattice of bacon, tomato paste, and Gouda cheese. Then Mirko popped it into the oven to produce this almost indescribable dish.

-via The Vulgar Chef


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Nathan Shields’ Pancakes

(YouTube link)

We’ve shown you many of the fantastically artful pancakes created by Nathan Shields. Now we get to see him at work! Watch how Shields make pancakes with his kids Gryphon and Alice, explaining how to get the shades right as they go. The dragon creation clues us in on a crucial step- getting rid of any attempt that’s not up to his standards. That’s my gardening philosophy, but I personally don’t do that with cooking as much as I should.

This is part three of Shields’ video series on pancakes. Continue reading for parts one and two.

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The Most Expensive Burgers in America

You have to wonder why a restaurant would offer a super-expensive hamburger, when a $5 burger on a real plate is gourmet food to most Americans. One reason is the publicity it brings, and the other reason is that some people will actually buy them just to show off how much they can spend on one. Take, for example, the Absolutely Ridiculous Burger from Mallie's Sports Grill & Bar in Southgate, Michigan.

Weighing in at 338.6 pounds, Michigan’s 540,000-calorie “Absolutely Ridiculous Burger” features 15 pounds of lettuce, 30 pounds of bacon, 30 pounds of tomatoes, and 36 pounds of cheese. The burger takes 22 hours to prepare, and it requires the strength of three grown men to lift the patty into the oven. According to the menu, “There is ABSOLUTELY no reason for this burger. But if you order it, we’ll make it, and you figure out what to do with it!”

The Absolutely Ridiculous Burger will set you back $1,999. Not all the pricy burgers are big, but they’ve each got something that makes them unique. First We Eat has a list of seven costly burgers, ranging from $120 to $5K. -via Digg

(Image credit: Mallie's)


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