Forgotten Pie Recipes We Should Start Baking Again

For many baked goods lovers like me fall and winter are pie season, a time to cook all those yummy pies we rarely get around to making in the spring or summer.

There's a whole list of standards such as pecan, apple, pumpkin and berry which we know we're going to bake every year, but isn't it about time to broaden our pie horizons?

I like to start my search for new recipes by looking at the recipes of the past, which is why I found the mental_floss article 8 Forgotten Pie Recipes We Should Bring Back so appealing.

I've made mincemeat pies before, once with a traditional recipe that included beef, but never a shoofly, sugar cream or buttermilk chess pie, which all sound simply irresistible.

And while vinegar pie doesn't sound very appetizing, and Marlborough pie sounds like a tobacco-based recipe, each and every pie on the list looks heavenly according to the recipes provided.

See 8 Forgotten Pie Recipes We Should Bring Back at mental_floss


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The Long and Curious History of Curry

“Curry” has become the unofficial cuisine of England, which has boosted that country’s culinary reputation considerably. It was once considered exotic, but shouldn’t have been, since it is eaten around the world and even appeared in an American cookbook as far back as 1824. In fact, the only place that doesn’t have a curry tradition is India.

That word “curry,” now as then, has a meaning as vague and inclusive as its ingredients. It can mean any stew made with “Indian” spices, as well as the yellow spice powder (usually a mixture of turmeric, coriander, cumin, and fenugreek) used in raisin-studded chicken salads. It’s not difficult to trace the spread of curry—it traveled by sea, following traders and slavers and laborers, the ancient vectors of colony and conquest—but the word itself is an altogether different beast, a bastard with many potential parents and no clear pedigree.

The Portuguese first came to India’s palm-toothed southern shores in 1498, in search of cardamom, cloves, and black pepper, each among the world’s most valuable commodities. Lacking a word to describe the spicy, coconut-thickened stews they found there, they went ahead and made one up: carel, taken from the Tamil word kari.

From those early traders, the Indian dishes we call curry followed the spread of imperialism. Read about how curry took over the world at the A.V. Club.  

(Image credit:  Nick Wanserski)


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Customer Gets Crusty When She Finds Out Subway Is Out Of Meatball Subs

It's safe to say Subway is serving up some of the most sub-par sandwiches in America, but there's one thing you can say about them, and indeed most chain restaurants- they're consistent.

People know what's on the menu and they expect it to be available and ready for consumption when they arrive, but do you know what happens when those expectations are diced like an onion?

Customers get all crusty, like the lady in this video who was deeply hurt by Subway's lack of meatball subs. (NSFW due to language)

(YouTube Link)

-Via Distractify


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The PaddyWagon Is An Inflatable Irish Pub You Can Open Anywhere

I'm not sure what the situation is in other cities/states/countries but Boston has more than enough Irish pubs to keep its thirsty citizens satisfied.

However, there are a few parts of Boston that are lacking Irish pubs, namely parks, backyards and other grassy lots, and that's where the PaddyWagon pub comes in.

The PaddyWagon is an inflatable structure that can be blown up wherever an Irish pub is needed, with room for 80 guests, food service and a full bar which the company supplies upon request.

This service is currently only available in the Boston area, but I could easily see this idea catching on here in Southern California, where we have perfect inflatable pub crawl weather all year long!

-Via design you trust


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The Hottest Chip On Earth Is Sold One At A Time

Spicy foods are really hard to eat, so it makes sense for manufacturers to sell them in smaller quantities since nobody really needs more than their mouth can handle.

But if you're going to sell your spicy chips one chip at a time they'd better live up to your claim that they're "the hottest chip in the world".

Paqui Chips is standing by the claim that their Carolina Reaper Madness chip is hot enough to be sold individually, and just to make sure foodies get the point they're selling each one in a little coffin box.

Seeing as how the Carolina Reaper is currently the hottest pepper in the world the Carolina Reaper Madness should come with the slogan "bet you can't even eat just one!"

-Via That's Nerdalicious


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McDonald’s Pumpkin Spice Fries

People go a little nuts over anything that is “pumpkin spice” flavored in autumn. Starbucks’ Pumpkin Spice Latte became such a hit that the pie flavors (cinnamon, cloves, ginger, nutmeg, and sometimes allspice) were put into everything: candy, cookies, ice cream, soda, and now french fries. Would you eat pumpkin spice fries? You won’t get the chance unless you’re in Japan. McDonald’s Japan is offering pumpkin spice fries beginning on September 28. They are normal everyday fries with a squirt of chocolate sauce and a squirt of pumpkin spice sauce. Yum!  -via Uproxx


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This Floating McDonald's Has Been Abandoned For Nearly 30 Years

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McDonald's tries to keep their locations central and easy to access, and they even offer unique services like ride up windows for those on horseback and paddle up windows for people in boats.

But there is one location that's no longer offering food service to anyone- because this floating McDonald's has been abandoned for nearly 30 years.

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This oddball McDonald's restaurant called Friendship 500, appropriately nicknamed McBarge, was built for Expo '86 in Vancouver, British Columbia to represent the architecture of the future.

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But it was abandoned and virtually left to rot in 1991, anchored in the Burrard Inlet of Vancouver's False Creek like a relic from the fast food industry's golden fried age.

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See the Creepy floating McDonald's that has been abandoned for nearly 30 years here


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Your Sushi Might Be Delicious, But Is It Art?

Image via designmilk [Instagram]

Sushi-making is often called an artform, but rarely does the end product actually look like a work of art. Thanks to the newest trend in sushi making though, now your Japanese meals can actually look as beautiful as it tastes.

Image via hudsta17 [Instagram]

Whether illustrating patterns of shapes or just blocks of colors, the end result is stunning and just as delicious as the traditional rolls and nigiri you're used to.

Image via rarerollingobject [Instagram]

Via Travel + Leisure


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Copycat Restaurant Recipes That Taste Spot On

The only things keeping you from making all those yummy dishes served up by your favorite eateries at home are a recipe and the right ingredients, although a little cooking experience doesn't hurt either.

And nowadays there are so many chefs and foodies posting content online you can find a copycat recipe for just about any popular dish you like, including CPK's BBQ Chicken Skillet Pizza.

Want to make In-N-Out's Animal Style burgers at home? Check out this recipe by Delish and see how easy it is to make.

Craving The Cheesecake Factory's rich and buttery shrimp scampi?

It's actually quite easy to make at home with this recipe, and then you can customize it to suit your taste!

See 30 Copycat Restaurant Recipes That Taste So Spot On It's Scary here


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The Nightmare Foods of a 1970 Cookbook

Who doesn't love creamed egg cassarole in a corned beef crust? Or how about seafood loaf complete with noodles and tuna? Ok, I'm kidding, these are the things nightmares are made of. And if you think they sound bad, just wait until you see the photos.

These recipes and more horrifying ideas are courtesy of a 70s cookbook called Happy Living! A Guidebook for Brides that was given away for free when brides registered at a regional department store. As if the foods weren't awful enough, the advice is also attrocious -like how to decorate your table and garnish your foods because those are the only satisfying things in your life and the only way to keep your husband happy with you.


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Fried Jell-O? Yes, Fried Jell-O

State fairs are known for deep-fried goodness and the reality is that because new items are introduced every year at practically every fair, it's hard to find new and unusual creations. That being said, fried Jell-O is certainly a new one and unlike fried Kool Aid and many other fried treats, it's not just funnel cake with some kind of liquid poured  into the batter. This time it's actually Jell-O battered and then deep fried and it must be good -after all, it won first place in the Best Taste award at the Texass State Fair. So if you get your chance to find some fried Jell-O, remember, there's always room for J-E-L-L-O.


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Architectural Designer Applies Her Skills To Baking Cakes

Bakers and pastry chefs have elevated the art of making cakes from the simple sheet to edible three-dimensional sculptures that are almost too cool looking to eat.

And then Ukranian architectural designer and cake baker Dinara Kasko decided cakes could still look really cool in basic shapes, so she started making these geometric cake masterpieces. 

Her modern art-inspired cakes are simplistic and simply elegant, but the simplicity belies the fine detail work and geometric perfection Dinara puts into each cake she creates.

Dinara achieves this amazing(ly perfect) level of geometric detail with a little help from 3D printed silicone molds that keep the edges sharp, but the rest of the cake magic is all applied by hand.

See What Happens When Architectural Designer Tries Baking Desserts here


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Kids Taste Test 100 Years Of Brown Bag Lunches

Kids have been bringing brown bag lunches to school for at least the last hundred years, and even though the overall contents have stayed the same the individual parts have changed dramatically.

A brown bag lunch typically includes a drink, a piece of fruit, a sandwich and a sweet snack, contents which have been a constant since the early 1900s.

However, the kids of today would throw a fit if they found a jar of warm milk and a radish sandwich in their bag, which was a fairly standard lunch for kids in the early 1900s.

(YouTube Link)

Bon Appétit subjected a bunch of youngsters to the brown bag lunches of yesteryear, starting with that nasty radish sandwich and ending with the pre-packaged Lunchables craze of the 90s.

-Via Spoon University

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbpMy0Fg74eXXkvxJrtEn3w

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Ketchup Chips

We know that the number one vegetable in the US is the French fry, and we eat them with ketchup. By the ton. Potatoes and ketchup are as American as you can get. So why don’t Americans eat ketchup-flavored potato chips? Maybe because they aren’t sold in American grocery stores. They are a well-known Canadian snack.

The best ketchup chips are made by Lay’s and sold only in Canada. They’re a masterpiece of MSG-laden zip and crunch. The beauty of Lay’s ketchup chips is that they don’t taste at all like actual ketchup: They taste like ketchup’s component parts, without the wet. You get the slap of vinegar and citric acid, the sweet, synapse-twerking pull of cooked tomatoes and sugar, the crunch of deep-fried potato starch, and all the lip-sticking salt of a Dead Sea skinny dip. Which is to say they’re snack-time solid gold. Most good Canadians can eat a quarter-kilogram bag in a go.

The A.V. Club tells us what they know about ketchup chips, their origin, and speculation on why Americans don’t demand them. Have you ever eaten ketchup chips? Do you like them?

(Image credit: Flickr user Jimmy Emerson, DVM)


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Terry Crews Tricks People Into Eating Crickets

Crickets are a great source of protein, they can be prepared in many different ways and, unlike our other sources of protein, they're a renewable resource.

But people still haven't come around to replacing their normal sources of protein with bugs so, as Terry Crews discovered, the only way to get people to gobble up a bunch of crickets is to trick them.

However, Terry is so fit he had no problem convincing some of the BuzzFeed staff to try out his new "protein shake", which tasted like a malted chocolate milkshake instead of a glass full of ground up crickets. (Barely NSFW due to language)

(YouTube Link)

Chocolate covered crickets are pretty tasty, as long as you don't mind getting a few legs stuck in your teeth.

-Via BuzzFeed


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What Was the Most Popular Food the Year You Were Born

Food trends come and go, and while we can't stop hearing about kale and Greek yogurt these days, people in the seventies loved quiche and fondue. Now, thanks to Cosmopolitan, you can find out what the most popular food was the year you were born (assuming you were born after 1970 -but hey, you can look up your kid's birth years otherwise). I was born in the year of pasta alla vodka but there are certainly some years I relate with a lot better. How about you?

Via Good Housekeeping


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Why the Purple Skittle Tastes Different Outside America

In the United States, purple Skittles taste like grapes, or more accurately, artificial grape flavoring. But in Britain, Australia, and other nations, those Skittles are flavored with blackcurrant. In fact, the rest of the world is quite familiar with the berry, which is used for juice, jam, and other products.  

Most American mouths have never tasted the sweet yet tart tang of the blackcurrant berry. There’s a big reason for that: in the early 20th century, the growing of blackcurrants was banned on a federal level in the U.S. after legislators discovered that the plants, brought over from Europe, had become vectors for a wood-destroying disease known as white pine blister rust.

During the 1960s, the federal ban on the berry was relaxed in favor of state-by-state jurisdiction, and most states now allow it to be grown. But the damage had already been done—the blackcurrant jams, juices, pastries and cakes that are standard throughout Europe are nowhere to be found stateside.

A few food producers are trying to change that. While American Skittles may stay grape forever, there may be other blackcurrant foods coming to a store near you. Read about them at Atlas Obscura.


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The Most Delicious Saxophone Ever Played

Music nourishes the soul, uplifts the spirit and feeds our heads, but only this pancake saxophone can play the breakfast blues and feed a family of five at the same time.

This feast for the eyes and ears dubbed the "stacksophone" was shared by Denny's Diner last year but the concept is timeless, especially if you're thinking about becoming a restaurant-based busker!

-Via Laughing Squid


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Food of the Gods

Let's talk about chocolate!

Chocolate comes from the cacao tree, Theobroma cacao. It’s a fitting name because theobroma comes from the Latin words for “food of the gods.”

Mayan emperors were often buried with jars of chocolate.

The average American consumes approximately 11.7 pounds of chocolate each year, but only 29 percent choose dark chocolate over milk.

Chocolate comes from the ivory-colored seeds of the cocoa tree’s fruit. Each melonlike fruit contains 20 to 50 seeds. About 400 seeds are required to make a pound of chocolate.

In 1974 a Pepperidge Farm employee in a Downington, Pennsylvania, plant died after falling into a vat of chocolate. His name: Robert C. Hershey.

The chemical theobromine is what makes chocolate fatal to pets— many animals don’t metabolize it well. Generally, the darker the chocolate, the more theobromine.

People who are depressed eat about 55 percent more chocolate than people who aren’t.

The Mars Candy Company is not named for the planet, but for its founder, Frank Mars.

Cocoa butter liquefies at a temperature slightly below 98.6 ° F, which is why it melts in your pocket. M&Ms were invented to provide sugar shells that had a higher melting temperature.

The Aztecs discovered and named chocolatl, but they used it as a beverage for its feel-good effects, not its flavor. In fact, chocolatl meant “bitter water.”

British candy maker Cadbury made the world’s first heart-shaped box of chocolates in 1861.

White chocolate has all the fat and sugar of chocolate, but none of the healthy flavonoids… and no solid cocoa. It does contain cocoa butter, though.

In 2004 interviewers asked British office workers if they would reveal their computer passwords in exchange for a chocolate bar— 71 percent said they would.

Cocoa usually starts losing flavor after about six months.

(Image credit: André Karwath)

_______________________________

The article above is reprinted with permission from Uncle John’s Bathroom Reader Attack of the Factoids. Weighing in at over 400 pages, it's a fact-a-palooza of obscure information.

Since 1988, the Bathroom Reader Institute had published a series of popular books containing irresistible bits of trivia and obscure yet fascinating facts. If you like Neatorama, you'll love the Bathroom Reader Institute's books - go ahead and check 'em out!


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The Best Of The Worst Crappy Food Porn

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Well photographed food porn makes viewers salivate and leaves them feeling hungry, but dishes that both look and sound disgusting, aka sh$%#y food porn, makes people want to skip a meal.

And no matter how fancy the plating or perfect the photographic composition that food just comes out looking like crap on a plate, hence the name.

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A glazed weiner suspension with ketchup and mustard foam and cryogenic pickle relish julienne sounds like haute cuisine but photographs like some nasty meat jell-o dish your grandma used to make.

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Contributors to the sh$%#y food porn subreddit have made creating and photographing crappy dishes into an art form, bringing highbrow food porn aesthetics to lowbrow dishes like microwaved hot dogs in pickle buns or chicken checkers, whatever that is.

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See The Very Best of the Absolute WORST Crappy Food Porn here


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Cookie Monster's Famous Sugar Cookie Dough Recipe

Some time in the 1970s, we got a look at Cookie Monster’s favorite cookie recipe, when it was published in Big Bird's Busy Book. You don’t have to squint and read the page, because the recipe is typed out at The Kitchn. -via Nag on the Lake


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This Body Pillow is As Cool As A Cucumber

Vegetables are great for a health and while it's usually best to eat them, sometimes it's nice to cuddle with them in order to thank them ffor all they've done for us. That's why we love this great giant cucumber body pillow that's just perfect for chilling out with. Of course, if you prefer pickles, it could serve as a large pickle pillow instead -which might be the ideal way to satisfy a pregnancy craving. You might recognize the work of Etsy seller jumbojibbles as she created the giant carrot body pillow we featured a few years ago.


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French Fry Toppings From Around the World

You probably know Americans love ketchup on their fries and the French love to dip theirs in mayonnaise, but did you know that San Diegians love to top theirs with cheese, guacamole and carne asada? Or that fries in Vietnam are often covered in butter and sugar? That's right, there are a lot of ways to eat fries and this cool article covers interesting combinations from around the world. It's got me craving some curry chips right now.


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Hot Dog! 23 Hot Dog-related Facts

Neatorama presents a guest post from actor, comedian, and voiceover artist Eddie Deezen. Visit Eddie at his website or at Facebook.

1. Americans consume 16 billion hot dogs annually.

2. Americans eat 150,000,000 hot dogs on the 4th of July alone (two billion in the month of July)!

3. Dick Stuart, first baseman for the Pittsburgh Pirates, led the league in errors a record seven years in a row. Dick was once given a standing ovation when he fielded a hot dog wrapper that was blowing across the field.

4. Elvis Presley recorded the song “Hot Dog" for the 1957 movie Loving You.

5. Elvis liked his hot dogs boiled in a pot filled with sauerkraut. Elvis enjoyed munching on plain hot dog buns too- no hot dog, just the buns!

6. Charlie Kazan, age 89, has had hot dogs for dinner every night since he was 11 months old. (He eats his hot dogs on rye bread with the crust torn off.)

7. The “Oscar Meyer Wiener Song" has been recorded by the Berlin Symphony Orchestra, a teen folk band, a string ensemble and a Nashville country-western group.

8. The Vienna Symphony Orchestra once performed the “Oscar Meyer Wiener Song" for a commercial.

9. The average hot dog is consumed in 6.1 bites.

Continue reading

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The Burning Desire for Hot Chicken

Honestly, I had never heard of Nashville Hot Chicken until KFC started advertising it (for a limited time). But people who’ve lived or spent considerable time Nashville sing its praises. The common experience is that you love it while you’re eating it, then it causes pain, then you dream of eating it again. For around 80 years, several restaurants in Nashville have served hot chicken, with slightly varying recipes. But in the past few years, it’s become a phenomena, so much that foodies make pilgrimages to Nashville, Tennessee, to eat chicken. How did the dish come about in the first place?  

The story remains such a foundational part of hot chicken’s allure that it bears repeating (and, frankly, it never gets old): Back in the 1930s, there was a man named Thornton Prince, who had a reputation around town as a serial philanderer. His girlfriend at the time, sick of his shit and spending her nights alone, decided to do something about it. After a long night out, Prince came home to breakfast. His girlfriend made fried chicken, his favorite. But before serving it, she caked on the most volatile spices she had in the pantry — presumably cayenne pepper and mustard seed, among other things. If it didn’t kill him, at least he would reevaluate his life choices. He didn’t do either — Prince fell harder for the over-spiced piece of chicken than he did for any woman he’d ever courted. Prince implored her to make it for his family and friends — they all loved it, too.

An act of revenge became a neighborhood treasure, and Nashville’s one true indigenous food. The identity of Prince’s girlfriend (the real innovator here) has been lost to time, but the fearful flashes of mortality that hot chicken eaters have experienced for more than 80 years gives a particular angel in heaven her wings.

Danny Chau ate hot chicken at three different Nashville restaurants, all well-known for their hot chicken. He tells the story of each experience, and rates the food for those who may want to follow. -via Digg


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Director Creates The Perfect "Burger Drop" Without Using CGI

Fast food restaurants love to employ the burger drop in commercials nowadays, showing us each layer of the burger and how fresh and bouncy it is to entice us into heading for the drive-thru.

It may surprise you to know the burger used in the drop is often CGI, modeled and animated for the perfect mouth-watering look, but not all ad directors agree with using CGI in a burger commercial.

In fact, one practical effects crazy photographer/director named Steve Giralt wanted a real burger drop so bad he built an entire machine to make it happen.

He calls it the “Precision Arduino Timing Relay Imaging Controller”, or P.A.T.R.I.C. For short, and it not only makes the burger drop a breeze- it kicks buns at making ketchup and mustard collide in mid-air.

 photo slow-motion-burger-drop-machine-steve-giralt-1_zpsimwqkpsu.gif

Here's a short video showing what it was like behind the scenes while shooting this burger ad:

Deconstructed Burger Behind The Scenes from Steve Giralt on Vimeo.

-Via Bored Panda


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Ketchup Cake is a Thing -Should Not Be a Thing

Just hearing the words "ketchup cake" makes a lot of us want to vomit, but Heinz ketchup thought it sounded good enough to add a recipe for it on their labels. While most people looked at it, thought "ewwww" and moved on, one insane Redditor thought "why not?"

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Of course, while he was mad enough to create the cake, even he wasn't brave enough to try it -so he invited some friends over to do it. Surprisingly, they seem to think it's alright -until the very end, when one of them actually tries the cake without the frosting.

Via First We Feast


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Daredevil Bathes In A Tub Full Of Hot Sauce

Daredevils are a dime a dozen on the internet these days, so those who choose to keep daredevilin' have to come up with more exciting and dangerous stunts to keep their internet audience tuning in.

That means people like Cemre Candar must resort to doing stunts even the guys from Jackass weren't dumb enough to do, like bathing in a tub filled with 1250 bottles of hot sauce.

(YouTube Link)

It's hard to imagine what stunt videos will look like ten years from now, but at this rate daredevils may start disemboweling or beheading themselves for the sake of viewership in the near future.

But then how will they know how many people watched their video?

-Via That's Nerdalicious


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Guy Makes An Axe Handle Out Of Gummy Bears

Gummy candy lovers can't get enough of those rubbery little treats, their vibrant colors and whimsical shapes enough to brighten up even the greyest day.

Unfortunately, we can't gobble up gummies all day long or we may become diabetic, so the best way to surround ourselves with gummy candy is to make stuff out of gummy candy.

So manly man and maker Peter Brown was asked by his Twitter followers to combine the most fun form of candy with totally macho functionality and make an axe handle out of gummy bears.

Peter made a mold from his "original" axe handle, stuffed five pounds of gummy bears in the cavity of the mold then used a clear resin to cast a durable yet delicious looking axe handle for hungry hewers.

(YouTube Link)

-Via design you trust


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The History Of Mac And Cheese

Young people might be forgiven for thinking that Kraft invented macaroni and cheese. Thomas Jefferson enjoyed it on a diplomatic mission to France- so much that he championed its adoption in America. But even before that, macaroni and cheese was an old and established European dish. How far back does it go?

The Liber de Coquina, or Book of Cooking, was published around the beginning of the 1300s. That’s roughly the same time William Wallace was marauding around Britain and killing English. Liber de Coquina includes recipes for baked pasta dishes with parmesan and other cheese sauces. Basically your average mac and cheese casseroles. If you can read Latin, the cookbooks are available online. They’re a fascinating snapshot into our shared culinary past.

The development of the ubiquitous and comforting macaroni and cheese from its earliest documentation until today is chronicled at Uproxx.

(Image credit: Ralph Ordaz)


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