21 Kitchen Hacks That Make Cooking So Much Easier

You want to keep your pot on the stove from boiling over? Place a wooden spoon over the top. This pops the bubbles as they rise to the top and before they spill over.

Would you like to shuck a strawberry without mutilating it? Shove a straw through the bottom to core it like an apple.

These are just 2 of 21 handy kitchen hacks rounded up by BuzzFeed. Check them all out, including how to peel a mango with a glass and how to get perfectly clear ice cubes.


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This Pizza Box Is Made Out of Pizza

The owner of Vinnie's Pizzeria, Sean Berthiaume, must have been channeling Xzbit earlier this week when he thought to himself, "Yo Dawg, I heard you liked pizza, so I put your pizza in a box made from pizza." But lo and behold here is the world's first ever entirely edible pizza box that really works as more of a pizza sandwich than a functional box.

This isn't Sean's first brush with pizza glory. In fact, just last year he introduced the pizza-topped with slices of smaller pizzas. One thing's for sure, when we finally enter a true world of pizzaception, it will be served up at Vinnie's.


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Black Velvet Nebula Cake

Black Velvet Nebula Cake - new recipe with step-by-step painting tutorial on sprinklebakes.com!

A photo posted by Heather Baird (@sprinklebakes) on Apr 4, 2016 at 6:16pm PDT

Suddenly, I want to throw a birthday party for someone, anyone, so I can try this cake. Alas, it may be beyond my abilities, and it's certainly beyond my existing utensils. Baker and food artist Heather Baird was impressed by the Veil Nebula and created a cake to resemble the images. It’s a black velvet cake (using extra black) with white confetti sprinkles for stars. The outside is black fondant painted with gel food coloring. You can find the complete instructions (and more pictures) at Sprinkle Bakes. -via Laughing Squid


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The Bomb: A New Way to Eat Pizza

(Photo: dann_grace)

The Place, an Italian restaurant in Seoul, South Korea, has invented an entirely new way to cook, serve, and eat pizza. It's called The Bomb.


(Video Link)

The Bomb consists of the uncooked (or at least partially uncooked) pizza ingredients inside a bubble of dough. The server pours oil over the top and lights it on fire. The dough burns. When the fire goes out, the server cuts open the bubble with a pair of scissors and slices the bottom half.

-via First We Feast


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Illustrated Chart Shows 40 Different Types Of Pizza

No matter how you like you're pizza pie you've got to agree on one thing- it's all about the toppings.

With the addition of toppings the pizza becomes our own personal slice of heaven, custom created to suit our tastes no matter how mundane or strange.

We're familiar with the pizza standards such as the Hawaiian, White, and Meat Lovers, and even specialty pies such as Barbecue Chicken and Bacon Ranch have become more mainstream.

But I don't think most pizza lovers will ever come to terms with the idea of covering a pizza in tuna and corn or *gasp* SALAD?!

The ever hungry foodies at Food Republic created an illustrated chart that poses the question “Have You Tried These 40 Types Of Pizza?” and the short answer is no, you probably haven't.

But now you'll be inspired to go out and try them all, and if you actually have tried them all you deserve the title “Pizza Master”, or “Pizza Wizard” if you prefer.

See full sized chart here

-Via Nerdist


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Line Cooks Share Tips And Tricks Every Home Chef Should Know

Being a line cook may not be the most glamorous job in the kitchen, and they may do most of the work for little glory, but their on-the-job training makes them superhuman cooking machines.

Thrillist asked line cooks across the country to share their tips and tricks with the folks at home and their replies came out just right.

There are basic tips: only flip your steak or burger once while cooking to lock in flavor, always start with the dish that takes the longest to cook, and save time by microwaving potatoes.

And tricks that make life easier: use a ladle to perfectly poach an egg, always boil eggs in salt water so the shells peel easier, and use Tupperware lids to slice multiple cherry tomatoes or grapes in half fast.

Read Line Cook Secrets Every Home Chef Should Know here


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Big Mac Egg Rolls

This week, The Vulgar Chef made lovely and classy egg rolls using just the ingredients of McDonald's Big Mac hamburgers, cheese, and egg roll pastry dough.

First, he placed shredded cheese between two layers of pastry dough. Then he added French fries, pickles, and sliced beef patty.

It looks delicious! McDonald's should actually offer this dish.

Content warning: foul language.


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The History Of Pizza Told In Eight Slices

Tracing the history of pizza back to its earliest roots is virtually impossible, since ancient people often used bread as a plate and therefore probably ate something similar to the modern pizza.

But when did the pizza pie we know and love come out of the oven, and how did that flat “plate” of dough covered in cheese and toppings become the single most popular food in the world?

(YouTube Link)

The PBS Idea Channel's Mike Rugnetta serves up the sizzling history of the pizza one slice of info at a time, and after your brain eats up all eight slices you'll feel full...of knowledge about the pie that conquered the world!

-Via Nerdist


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Autopsy Of A Banana

When fruit dies in mysterious ways The Food Surgeon is there to help make sense of it all, using his forensic skills to get to the bottom of important cases like “who aced the apple?” or “how did the banana end up in a body bag?”

With expert surgical precision and a passion for busting food defilers, The Food Surgeon is a foodie for justice who occasionally eats the "cadaver" when he's done...

(YouTube Link)

Read the surgeon's hilarious notes here

-Via Laughing Squid


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How to Make S'more Eclairs

Hannah, the Domestic Gothess, made these simply perfect eclairs with a toasted marshmallow cream filling. She dipped the tops in melted chocolate, then added gourmet marshmallows. For a special treat, she covered the tops with craquelin, which is a type of French pastry dough. This give her s'more eclairs an extra crunch and sweetness. You can find her full recipe here.

-via Tasteologie


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Chocolate Chip Cookie-Topped Chocolate Chip Cookie

When you're only allowed to eat one cookie, then you need to stretch the definition of "one". Joe Castro, the head chef at Quest Nutrtion in Los Angeles developed Cookieception and photographed it appropriately with a background of Cookie Monster blue. You can find his recipe here.

The obvious next step would be to use this giant cookie as a topping for a larger cookie.

-via Thrillist


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Rainbow Pizza

So you've already had the rainbow grilled cheese sandwich for breakfast. What's for lunch? I suggest the rainbow pizza. Amy of the marvelous food blog Oh, Bite It made this pepperoni pizza with an extra thick layer of mozzarella on top.

As soon as she pulled it out of the oven, she dripped food coloring into the cheese and spread the colors through the cheese with a fork. It's like a food version of a sonic rainboom!


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Rainbow Grilled Cheese

Rainbow grilled cheese? That just seems like something you wouldn’t want to try. Rainbow foods are usually sweet, or at least that’s what the brain tells you. But this is from Hong Kong, so who knows? The description doesn’t sound too bad:

Sold by Hong Kong’s Kala Toast, the sandwiches cost 42 HKD (around $5 USD). And that cheese you see isn’t just colored — it’s also flavored. The blue is lavender, green is basil and red is tomato; the yellow is actually a combination of gruyere, emmental, mozzarella, and cheddar cheese.

See more pictures of this odd sandwich at Uproxx.


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Eats Like a Duck

Over 27 seasons on TV, there’s been a lot of food featured on the TV show The Simpsons. Eats Like a Duck chronicles those foods one at a time, with references to the episode it appeared in and recipes. For example, in the episode “Homerpalooza” (season 7), Homer tries to sneak homemade Kahlua into a concert. Yes, that’s a bad idea, but this is Homer we’re talking about. Still, homemade Kailua can be a great thing used in the proper context.



Other recipes include Bart’s Grilled Twizzlers, A Cool Glass of Turnip Juice, Blandoori, Clove Tom Collins Pie, and of course, The Flaming Homer. -via Metafilter


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Pretty Pig Donut

Dominique Ansel, the inventor of the cronut, is hard at work developing new and tasty pastries. Here's a religieuse (more refined people might be offended by the term "donut"), which means two filled choux pastries stacked on top of each other. Ansel has decorated this one to look like a contented pig. It's available at Ansel's bakery in the Soho neighborhood of Manhattan


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You Don't Win Friends with Salad

Neatorama is proud to bring you a guest post from Ernie Smith, the editor of Tedium, a twice-weekly newsletter that hunts for the end of the long tail. In another life, he ran ShortFormBlog.

(Image credit: Flickr user Grant)

The salad bar is something that many restauranteurs claim to have invented, but we know for sure that just one guy invented the sneeze guard.

In January, a major lobbying group for the school lunch industry won a victory that involved salad bars. The School Nutrition Association, feeling the pressure because of what it called arduous nutrition rules, fought for (and won) a slightly more reasonable policy, including rules that specifically allowed schools to continue to offer salad bars to those super-grubby, messy kids. Some local health inspectors tried to veto the salad bars, claiming they created health hazards. But the updated law Congress came up with clarified that salad bars are safe. Today’s issue ponders why salad bars have become so common and whether the scale is trying to rip us off.

Salad Bar Origins

“You know, I looked at what was the problem with restaurants. You’d go in, the waiter would come up to the table, maybe he wouldn’t, and then he’d take an order, and disappear for a while. You’d fill up on bread. I said I want to let the customer see what he’s getting. And that includes a salad.”

— Norman Brinker, a groundbreaking restauranteur during the 1960s and 1970s, discussing his claimed invention of the salad bar concept for his Steak & Ale restaurant chain. Whether he did or not is a point of dispute, but he most certainly had the most success with it. (He also played a key role in the expansion of two other chains that you’re probably more familiar with, Chili’s and Bennigan’s.) Brinker, who gained status as a business guru before his death, was a master at building a more casual approach to dining—hiring cheery college students instead of snooty waiters and creating a vibe that encouraged repeat visits. And to think, it all started with the salad bar.

Continue reading

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Gold-Covered Ice Cream Cones

(Photo: hateyou218)

Soft serve vanilla ice cream in a cone is a true treat on any day. You could even say that it's a common luxury. So why not dress it accordingly? There's an ice cream shop in Kanazawa, Japan that sells its ice cream cones in gold foil. That's not gold-colored foil, mind you, but actually gold.

Continue reading

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You Had Me at Meat Tornado

(Photo: Thrillist)

What would convince Ron Swanson to try ethnic food? Maybe this meat tornado in Leo's Taco Truck in Los Angeles. It didn't literally kill a guy last year (as far as I know), but it does offer top-tier Mexican food.

The truck serves tacos al pastor, which is a type of vertical roasting. Serious Eats describes it:

There, in true al pastor form, the taqueras marinate thin, thin slices of pork shoulder in a mixture of chilies and aromatics colored bright red with achiote. The slices are then stacked onto a vertical skewer, forming a large, bell-shaped trompo (spinning top), which gets topped with an onion and pineapple, and slowly rotates in front of a vertical grill.


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That's What I Call Fruit Cake

I love a great piece of ripe fruit, but I admit, I love cake a little more, which is why this fruit basket looks so amazing to me. That's right -it's all cake. Don't believe me, check out this picture.

These surprising delights were made by Christine McConnell, author of Deceptive Desserts. Each of the cakes inside are different and in all the basket contains lime meringues, caramel apple pies, blueberry lemon hand pies, pear tarts, orange creme cakes and chocolate coated raisin grapes. Well, at least some of them contain real fruits inside.

Via That's Nerdalicious


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How to Make Taco Bell Food at Home

The Brothers Green give us step-by-step instructions for making classic Taco Bell items at home. You might think this is more trouble than its worth, but listen: I’ve been a fan of the Taco Bell Meximelt since they were introduced in the early ‘80s. Back then they were meat- and cheese-filled and heavenly. I still like them, but now they have very little of anything inside. Sometimes they forget the meat completely, sometimes you can’t find any cheese, and you can take a couple of bites with no tomato, so making them at home would be nice.

(YouTube link)

The first video explains the ground beef, refried beans, fire sauce, nacho cheese sauce, tacos, crunch wrap supreme, double decker taco, and Mexican pizza. Although you really can’t explain Mexican pizza.  

(YouTube link)

The second video has the seasoned steak, marinated chicken, creamy jalapeño (Baja) sauce, quesadillas, Baja gordita, chalupa, grilled stuffed burrito, and the cheesy gordita crunch.
If your favorite isn’t here, remember that most of Taco Bell’s dishes are combination of basic items that are pretty easy to figure out. And I’m going to make that quesadilla, sans steak, as soon I stock up on groceries. -via Digg


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Delightfully Odd Marshmallow Art

When is a marshmallow more than a marshmallow? When it's a work of art, of course. Instagram user Meaghan Mountford (@mallowart) proves that marshmallows are a surprisingly good canvas with her delightful mallow creations.

No word on whether or not the mallows are still edible after they are beautified, but who could eat such charming works of art anyway?


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Pizza-Stuffed Crust Pizza with Mini Pizzas on Top

Anything worth doing is worth overdoing. That's why, when you want a top-grade pizza, you call in The Vulgar Chef.

This week, he went deliciously overboard cooking pizza. He prepared two circles of pizza dough, one slightly smaller than the other. Then he placed between them a whole frozen pizza that he had already cooked and cooled. He baked this assembly briefly, then flipped it over and added toppings, such as cheese and tomato sauce. Most importantly, he added miniature pizzas on bagel bites.

The result is a profoundly pizza-like pizza. It's the Inception of the pizza world. You can find more photos and a production video by The Vulgar Chef here (content warning: foul language).


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The 9 Most Ridiculous Baseball Stadium Foods

(Photo: Atlanta Braves)

Do you need a snack while watching a game at Turner Field in Atlanta? Then pop over to a concession stand. For $26, you'll be able to buy a Burgerizza. That's a massive bacon cheeseburger sandwiched between two whole pizzas.

This is 1 of 9 insane stadium foods offered this year at Major League Baseball parks rounded up by First We Feast. Others include Froot Loop-covered hot dogs and a Monster energy drink barbecue sandwich.


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The Donut of Monte Cristo

To make a Monte Cristo sandwich, assemble white bread, sliced ham or turkey, and Swiss cheese. Dip the sandwich in egg batter, then either deep fry or pan fry the result. When it's done, sprinkle it with powdered sugar.

Crafted Donuts in Fountain Valley, California offers this sandwich in a marvelous donut form. The traditional fillings, as well as what appears to be strawberry and lemon jelly, fill the interior of this breakfast treat. Yummy! 

-via Thrillist


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The Raindrop Cake Looks Like a Blob of Water

(Photo: Tim Ireland)

Darren Wong, a chef in New York City, invented the Raindrop Cake. It's a dessert inspired by mizu shingen mochi, a Japanese dish. It consists of mineral water and agar. You can eat the Raindrop Cake plain, but then it tastes a bit bland. For additional flavor, try adding soybean flour or brown syrup on top.

Wong talked to BuzzFeed about how he developed this unusual dessert:

Wong spent a lot of time on cooking forums to get an idea of what was likely to work and then experimented with a ton of different gelatins and agars.

“The hardest was trying to figure out how to store and transport something so fragile,” Wong said. “That entails packaging each individual cake separately in its own protective cocoon until it’s ready to be served.”

You can eat one at the Smorgasburg, a food fair in Brooklyn.


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Cannoli Filled with Cannolis

Leave the gun. But definitely take the cannolis. Thrillist, I understand it, recently attended a cooking class hosted by the Barilla brand of pasta. The chefs prepared these extraordinary cannolis.

The obvious next step would be to prepare cannolis made of these cannolis--like a pastry version of Voltron.


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New Ballpark Offering: The Slider Dog

Baseball season is coming! Opening Day is Sunday. And Progressive Field in Cleveland is ready for gluttonous Indians fans with a new hot dog vendor, Happy Dog, who will offer a dog with all your favorite indulgences on it. The new Slider Dog is topped with macaroni and cheese, bacon, and Froot Loops. It’s an extension of this weird idea that if you like more than one thing, you should combine them. Yeah, I like all these things, and I like hot dogs, but throwing them all together seems like an infinitely bad idea. But what do I know? I don’t even go to Major League Baseball games. -via Uproxx


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Sixteen Facts You May Not Know About Cheetos

Cheetos may not be the most appealing looking snack foods, but their deliciousness, ease of oral delivery and satisfying crunch make them one of the most beloved snack foods in the world.

Whether you like them crunchy, flaming hot or funny shaped you can find Cheetos in 22 countries around the world, and there are more than 50 funky flavors out there including peanut butter, Pepsi and Japanese steak.

But if you're a fan of the flaming hot varieties that have become quite popular over the years you owe former Frito-Lay janitor Richard Montañez a word of thanks for coming up with the flavor.

 Armed with a sample bag and some marketing studies he talked his way into a meeting with the CEO and brought the heat to everybody's favorite cheesy treat.

Read 16 Weird Facts You Didn't Know About Cheetos here


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Deviled Dragon Eggs

What would the Mother of Dragons do for Easter? Not what redditor Cakorator did. With red gel, egg yolks, mayonnaise, mustard, sriracha, cayenne pepper, and a pastry bag with a size 5 tip, s/he made these adorable treats. They don't breathe fire, but with enough sriracha and cayenne pepper, you might after you eat them.


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The History of Chocolate Eggs

As we enjoy the last of the cold weather candy holidays (Halloween, Christmas, Valentines Day, Easter), let’s look at the ubiquitous chocolate egg. You may get one chocolate rabbit in your Easter basket, but you’ll probably see lots of eggs. Americans eat them by the bagful, while Europeans treat them like art. And while eggs have always been a sign of spring renewal and rebirth, where did the chocolate egg come from?

The history of the chocolate egg is murkier. The sixteenth-century introduction of Mesoamerican cacao to Europe created, at first, an imitative hot chocolate-drinking culture. At Versailles, chocolate was whipped with sweet almonds or orange flower water and—wait for it—an egg yolk. According to Élisabeth de Contenson’s Chocolat et son histoire, it was the eighteenth-century chocolate-drinkers who first blew out a chicken eggshell to fill with drinking chocolate: thus, the chocolate egg may predate the invention of solid eating chocolate.

An article at Lucky Peach traces the history of the chocolate Easter egg, but focuses more on Paris chocolatiers and their artistic eggs, which is a delight.

(Image credit: Flickr user Steve Mohundro)


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