How to Write a Scientific Research Report

E. Robert Schulman , C. Virginia Cox , and E. Anne Schulman Alexandria, Virginia


Abstract
The stacking properties of toroids that reflect radiation in the 1.8 to 2.8 eV energy range is investigated. Preliminary results indicate that in the optimal configuration the toroids are oriented vertically with those reflecting lower energy photons having larger gravitational potential energies for toroids of equal mass. The ambiguousness of this solution is tested by experiments performed by a relatively inexperienced researcher (t= 0.9167 yr). These experiments indicate that alternate solutions can be found.

1. Introduction

The significance of toroidal stacking properties in the present society should not be underestimated. A plurality of localities in which dwell immature Homo sapiens contain educational implements consisting of conic surfaces that can be combined with multiple toroids to produce coherent structures. The number of toroids per conic surface is usually five, and there is often an anticorrelation between toroidal radius and the mean energy of photons reflected by each torus.

In this paper, we report on the results of a study of toroidal stacking properties by independent groups. Two of us (ERS and CVC) are experienced researchers, while one of us (EAS) is a relatively inexperienced researcher, having an age of 0.9167 yr at the time the study was performed.

2. Description of Experimental Apparatus   

The experimental apparatus consists of six components: A solid with a circular base and a plane curve tapering uniformly towards a vertex, which has a mean reflected photon energy of 2.18 eV, and five toroids of different radii having mean reflected photon energies of 2.76, 2.43, 2.18, 1.97, and 1.80 eV. The experimental aparatus is shown in Figure 1 :

Experimental Aparatus

3. Description of Experiment 1   

In the first experiment, two of us (ERS and CVC) together attempted to determine the optimal toroidal stacking configuration. It was found that in the most advantageous mode the toroids are arranged in a vertical orientation with those reflecting lower energy photons having larger gravitational potential energies for toroids of equal mass. This solution is listed in column 2 of Table 1.

4. Description of Experiment 2   

In the second experiment, one of us (EAS) independently attempted to determine the optimal stacking configuration. A large number of acceptable solutions were found, although interestingly these did not include the solution described in section 3. Columns 3 to 8 of Table 1 list six solutions that were found using this method:

                   Table 1. Toroidal Stacking Solutions

                                   Solution Number
                 1       2a      2b      2c      2d      2e      2f

Level 6                 2.18    2.43    1.80    2.43    1.97    1.80
Level 5         1.80    1.97    1.80    2.43    1.80    1.80    2.18
Level 4         1.97                    1.97    1.97            1.97
Level 3         2.18    2.76    2.18    2.18
Level 2         2.43    2.43                            2.43    2.43
Level 1         2.76                    2.76            2.76
 

5. Discussion   

Although the experienced researchers consistently found only one optimal toroidal stacking solution, the relatively inexperienced researcher found a multiplicity of acceptable solutions. These results can be understood in the context of a model that predicts a strong correlation between acceptance of the current scientific paradigm and research experience.   

The verisimilitude of solution one is brought into question by its absence in the multiple trials of experiment two; despite the abstract plausibility and possible pedagogic utility of the concept of orienting toroids vertically with those reflecting lower energy photons having larger gravitational potential energies for toroids of equal mass, it is possible that this and similar concepts limit the phase space explorations of experienced researchers.

6. Conclusions   

The stacking properties of toroids that reflect radiation in the 1.8 to 2.8 eV range was investigated. Preliminary results indicated that in the optimal configuration the toroids are oriented vertically with those reflecting lower energy photons having larger gravitational potential energies for toroids of equal mass.   

The ambiguousness of this solution was tested by experiments performed by a relatively inexperienced researcher (t= 0.9167 yr), which indicated that alternate solutions can be found. In fact, the inexperienced researcher failed to find the original solution, suggesting that the phase space explorations of the experienced researchers were limited by their adherence to the currently accepted scientific paradigm.

An English translation of this report is also available.

_____________________

This article is republished with permission from the November-December 1999 issue of the Annals of Improbable Research.

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