Color Video of London in 1927

YouTube link.

This is a true color movie, not a "colorized" one.
This wonderful film was made in 1927 by Claude Friese-Greene. Colour film from the 1920s is exceptionally rare, and this is a very powerful example... The Cenotaph sequence from around 3:37 to 3:54 is very poignant. This was filmed only nine years after the end of the Great War. The women and looking at the wreaths would very likely be wives and mothers of the men killed, and the Second World War was, at that time, inconceivable.

Claude Friese-Greene was the son of pioneering cinematographer William Friese-Greene, and devoted himself to developing commercially his father’s colour process – Biocolour – but without great success. It was soon overtaken by Technicolor and Claude abandoned the process. His role as a pioneer of colour film has now been recognised.

Some aspects of London have changed a lot in 80+ years; others have changed very little.

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My dad lived in London and was seven when this was filmed - he remembered going to to the docks with his younger brother to watch the shipping. A bus ride or two from where they lived in Pimlico, unaccompanied.

My daughter's the same age now - and is looking forward to being able to go swimming on her own this summer when she's eight.
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Also found on that web site are some photos of London in the 1940s:

The second-last and last photos can be seen in their modern rendition on Google Street View:,-0.158148&sspn=0.002228,0.0053&ie=UTF8&radius=0.11&rq=1&ev=p&hnear=&ll=51.493118,-0.157848&spn=0,359.9947&z=18&layer=c&cbll=51.49323,-0.157876&panoid=SlBWZtd-WUhk67e4zcTcag&cbp=12,162.44,,0,2.63,-0.150912&sspn=0.004534,0.00869&ie=UTF8&rq=1&ev=zi&radius=0.19&hq=church&hnear=&ll=51.508669,-0.15324&spn=0,359.99131&z=17&layer=c&cbll=51.508703,-0.15309&panoid=coXHiFtXfwx4evlR8u21eQ&cbp=12,79.76,,0,4.56
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