Saturn's Aurora

That's an infrared image of an aurora on Saturn's polar cap, taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft:

Energetic particles, crashing into the upper atmosphere cause the aurora, shown in blue, to glow brightly at 4 microns (six times the wavelength visible to the human eye). The image shows both a bright ring, as seen from Earth, as well as an example of bright auroral emission within the polar cap that had been undetected until the advent of Cassini. This aurora, which defies past predictions of what was expected, has been observed to grow even brighter than is shown here. Silhouetted by the glow (cast here to the color red) of the hot interior of Saturn (clearly seen at a wavelength of 5 microns, or seven times the wavelength visible to the human eye) are the clouds and haze that underlie this auroral region.

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You say Saturn's Aura and I automatically think of a Vauxhall in drag.
So Saturnian polar dwellers need special glasses that show very high frequency wavelengths in order to see their Northern Lights?
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