Experts: Babies Lie. Parents: Duh!

Pyschologists inally confirmed what parents already knew forever: babies lie.

Behavioral experts have found that infants begin to lie from as young as six months. Simple fibs help to train them for more complex deceptions in later life.

Until now, psychologists had thought the developing brains were not capable of the difficult art of lying until four years old.

Following studies of more than 50 children and interviews with parents, Dr Vasudevi Reddy, of the University of Portsmouth's psychology department, says she has identified seven categories of deception used between six months and three-years-old.

Infants quickly learnt that using tactics such as fake crying and pretend laughing could win them attention. By eight months, more difficult deceptions became apparent, such as concealing forbidden activities or trying to distract parents' attention.

By the age of two, toddlers could use far more devious techniques, such as bluffing when threatened with a punishment.

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My cousin's daughter is about a year old, and she loves to do this 'fake choking' thing to get attention, then laughs when she gets the attention. It's be more annoying if she wasn't so damned cute.
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"psychologists had thought the developing brains were not capable of the difficult art of lying until four years old."

What? These particular psychologists must've never had, nor ever been, a child.
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