Schill MacGuffin's Liked Comments

I'd always assumed the rationale wasn't about ill effects on the patient, so much as wanting to head off the development of bacterial resistance -- wanting to be thorough in killing off bacterial that might have only been weakened, and even if they didn't induce a relapse, might multiply and spread to give a worse infection to the next person.
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I've had pretty good luck with simply roasting the bird face down in the pan, instead of the traditional pose of laying it on its back. I believe this encourages the natural juices to collect in the breast instead of dripping to the low-meat back and leaking out. It certainly requires minimal effort for a good return, though it might make for a less photogenically crispy-skinned bird. I've never really valued the holiday "photo op" very much, and typically cut at least half the meat off of the bird for easy serving before before bringing it out to the table.
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I actually find this more interesting, and certainly more dramatic, than the traditional version -- That the Wampanoag showed up thinking they were meeting an attack, and got drawn into the party is like a 1600s version of the World War I Christmas truce.
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It sounds to me like Brody is saying "Hello", perhaps because that's what he thinks Zora is saying.
I actually was involved in a similar exchange myself. My then-girlfriend was staying with me in my apartment, and had brought her cats. One of them had the habit of walking around with a yarn toy in her mouth at night, "calling" to non-existent babies (I don't think this is uncommon for female cats). Her call sounded an awful lot like "Hello!", and I woke up in a daze thinking someone was at the door at 3:00AM. After a few exchanged greetings, I eventually came to my senses and realized who I was talking to.
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It's a bit extreme to assert that if it had hit the Earth it would have decimated a city. First there would have been something like a 70% chance of hit landing on an ocean. If it did hit land, there'd be something like a one-third chance of it hitting sparsely inhabited desert, and probably another third or more of it landing in likewise sparsely inhabited jungle, tundra, or wilderness like Siberia.
I doubt a impact of "30x Hiroshima" would generate a destructive Tsunami if it did land at sea, since it'd likely be exploding on-or-above the surface instead of creating an underwater landslide. It's also not clear what the composition of this thing was -- a lot of damage estimates from asteroids are based on the "worst case" of a solid nickel-iron chunk, while most such objects are stony or even more loosely composed, like balls of boulders and gravel. Objects like that would tend to break up in the upper atmosphere, and while they might do some significant damage on the ground (a'la Tunguska), it's a lot less damage than a solid projectile would do.
So, 2019 OK actually hitting the Earth wouldn't have been a good thing, But it would still have been more likely not to hurt anyone than to wipe out a city.
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Indeed, TravisCurates. And handy cards in every seat back describing how to deploy them. This wasn't exactly like being buried alive. Not sure where the plane exactly was at the airport, or if there might have been snacks and drinks left aboard if she was hesitant to walk to the terminal until daylight, but clearly this was more of a nuisance than a tragedy. I'd personally view it as more of a strange and amusing adventure, and great material for dinner party conversation for years to come, though my attorneys might advise me to be more traumatized. ;)
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I was an unathletic kid, and I personally loved dodgeball. It seemed to me like a good equalizer with regard to the skills of the athletic kids and those who were not. It was quite satisfying to be on a more level playing field, in that sense, and to whack my "oppressors" with a ball. I specifically remember an instance where I was the "last man standing", and held out for another half-minute or so dodging the shots of all comers to the whole class' fleeting admiration.
Now, I suppose there are even less physically-able kids for whom it's as unpleasant as softball or gymnastics were for me, and more fundamentally pacifistic kids who simply find it fundamentally unpleasant. But I'm skeptical that any activity imposed by authority will please all participants. Ultimately I think it's the school environment itself that "reinforces the five faces of oppression".
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Many are beautiful, but the tl;dr is: "A good rule of thumb is if a caterpillar looks spiny, spiky or furry, do not pick it up as it most likely able to sting you."

That was already my policy, though it essentially leaves only hornworms and inchworms. I can recognize a gypsy moth caterpillar, though, and they're safe, at least to toss on a hard surface and squish, 'cause they're a real problem to many forests.
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I assume Munroe created that map in jest, as I've lived in Philadelphia all my life, and have never heard a carbonated beverage referred to as "Brad's Elixir", "Medicine", or "Hot Water".
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I remember catching Gabriel Over The White House on late night UHF TV back in the '80s, and being thoroughly shocked and amused. I really think the time is ripe for a remake, though perhaps playing it more as a creepy thriller than a feel-good film -- The party-hack staffers of a corrupt new President are shocked at his seemingly idealistic personality change after an accident... find themselves feeling kind of hopeful themselves... but then realize that he's going full bore Fascist, and may be possessed by some sort of spirit of unknown intent.
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Back in the '80s, in the parking lot of the Great Adventure amusement park in New Jersey, I saw a car with the NY plate: "QQOQQOQO" which I assume was someone's attempt at what the xkcd strip above was depicting. I wonder how it worked for him?
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As I said to my wife the other day at the Wal-Mart, while the self-checkout kept telling us to put down items we'd already put down, and to wait for assistance after scanning each item --
"Oh, yeah. We'll have those self-driving cars any day now..."
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Profile for Schill MacGuffin

  • Member Since 2014/02/15


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