Mosquito-Killer Fungus That Can Kill 99% of Malaria-Carrying Mosquitoes

In the 1980s, the humble village of Soumousso in Burkina Faso, West Africa, helped battle malaria through an ingenious method: insecticide-treated bed nets. Unfortunately, the mosquitoes developed resistance to widely used insecticides, and the bed nets became less effective. Now, researchers have been testing a new countermeasure for mosquitoes — a genetically modified fungus that can kill these malaria-carrying insects. 

In tests in a 600-square-meter structure in Soumousso called the MosquitoSphere—built like greenhouse but with mosquito netting instead of glass—the fungus eliminated 99% of the mosquitoes within a month, scientists report in this issue of Science.
"To be able to clear insecticide-resistant mosquitoes to this level is amazing," says entomologist Marit Farenhorst of In2Care, a mosquito control company in Wageningen, the Netherlands. But Farenhorst, who was not involved in the study, emphasizes that the fungus is a long way from real-world use.

Still, this could be a potential weapon that can be used to fight against one of the world’s deadly diseases.

(Image Credit: Sarah Weiser)


Oftentimes, we can find the best solution to a problem by turning to Nature. As for mosquitoes building a resistance to the fungus, then maybe we can find a different fungus.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
Login to comment.
Click here to access all of this post's 3 comments




Email This Post to a Friend
"Mosquito-Killer Fungus That Can Kill 99% of Malaria-Carrying Mosquitoes"

Separate multiple emails with a comma. Limit 5.

 

Success! Your email has been sent!

close window
X

This website uses cookies.

This website uses cookies to improve user experience. By using this website you consent to all cookies in accordance with our Privacy Policy.

I agree
 
Learn More