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Words That Are Different in British English and American English

It has been said that Britain and America are two countries forever divided by a common language. It should also be said that neither Britain nor America are actually countries; but you know the saying refers to the U.K. and the U.S. Differences in the meanings of words in British English and American English can cause confusion on both sides of the pond, so Bigstock blog posted a helpful list of twenty words that you should learn. For example, if you are in England and you want American potato chips, ask for potato crisps. If you say chips, you'll be given fries. If you ask for a biscuit, don't put gravy on it, because it will be a cookie. What others would you add? -via the Presurfer


Tights is another. Here in the states, it refers to a thick opaque stocking. Over in the UK, tights refers to all stockings. Tea can refer both to a drink and an afternoon meal.

Pissed is another - UK it means drunk, US it means angry.

In areas of Scotland the word Greet or Greeting means crying, in the States, it means to welcome.
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British toilet = loo, carzi, WC, bog, Ladies or Gents
Pussy = cat
Randy = horny
Cigarette = fag
Bar = local
small sandwich = butty
Us biscuit = Uk scone
pudding = any kind of dessert, if you want Us pudding ask for custard

A UK co-worker once told me that Brits did not eat popcorn because corn is horse food! I am a big Anglophile and I thought I knew most of the Britisms but today I learned 'Kitchen roll' for paper towels.
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And don't even think about riding your bike on the pavement while in the UK. So where are you supposed to ride? Makes a little more sense when you understand that pavement in the UK is the same as sidewalk in the US.
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I just spent a few weeks with relatives in the UK this past summer. All signs for bathrooms said "toilets". They wash their dishes with fairy liquid. Muffins are what you americans would call rolls, and we canadians would call buns! If you ask for lemonade, you get 7up. A truck is a lorry, but no one there drives a pickup truck anyway! It's interesting that they use a lot of french terms, considering their history with France. (Maybe it is because of their history with France?) Aubergine=eggplant. Courgette=zucchini. Gateaux=cake. Fete=party.
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If you want biscuits and gravy ask for scones and cream sauce (you'll get a funny look!). A grilled cheese sandwich is a cheese toastie. If they offer bangers and mash don't accept! Refuse the blood pudding also. Botty is your bum, or bottom. Boot/bonnet = trunk/hood.
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The word for the type of bread onto which you could put a burger varies from place to place: bread cake, barm, cob, bun, muffin, batch, roll, teacake... and probably more.

Even more fun can be had when you start exploring British regional dialects, including my own (Yorkshire):
Ee sez ee ant addit burra berry az = He say's he hasn't had it but I bet he has
Itin tin tin = it isn't in the tin (can)

Always remember this: if tha's got nowt an' tha wants owt, wuk 'ard an' tha'll allus end up wi summat if tha not deead fust! :)
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I might be late to the party, but here are a few geographical terms:

Fell _____ US - Past tense of "Fall" ____ UK - Hill or Mountain
How ______________________________ UK - Hill
Force ___ US - Push hard ____________ UK - Waterfall
Water ___ US - Liquid H2O ___________ UK - Lake
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