Miss Cellania's Blog Posts

R.I.P. Gene Wilder

Acclaimed actor Gene Wilder charmed us in movies like Blazing Saddles, Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, and Young Frankenstein. Wilder had an extensive film career that included several collaborations with Mel Brooks. He was also an accomplished stage actor, voiceover artist, writer, and director.

The comic actor, who was twice Oscar nominated, for his role in “The Producers” and for co-penning “Young Frankenstein” with Mel Brooks, usually portrayed a neurotic who veered between total hysteria and dewy-eyed tenderness. “My quiet exterior used to be a mask for hysteria,” he told Time magazine in 1970. “After seven years of analysis, it just became a habit.”

Habit or not, he got a great deal of mileage out of his persona in the 1970s for directors like Mel Brooks and Woody Allen, leading to a few less successful stints behind the camera, the best of which was “The Woman in Red,” co-starring then-wife Gilda Radner. Wilder was devastated by Radner’s death from ovarian cancer in 1989 and worked only intermittently after that. He tried his hand briefly at a sitcom in 1994, “Something Wilder,” and won an Emmy in 2003 for a guest role on “Will & Grace.”

Wilder also did a lot of charity work to raise funds for cancer research after Radner’s death in 1989. He worked only intermittently after that, and hardly at all after Will and Grace in 2003. Wilder was a victim of Alzheimer’s disease, which he and his family decided not to disclose to the public because so many children saw him as Willie Wonka, and he didn’t want knowledge of his condition to infringe on the joy of such an encounter. He passed away today at his home from complications the disease. Gene Wilder was 83.  

-via Uproxx


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Featured Designs from the NeatoShop:



The Closest Living Relative to the Dodo Bird

Look at this beautiful plumage! The Nicobar pigeon looks like it just came from an avant-garde beauty salon with a new dye job, but those are its normal feathers. Since they evolved in places where they had no natural predators, Nicobar pigeons did not need camouflage and instead developed a look to attract each other. They don’t look like dodo birds, but taxonomically they are the extinct bird’s closest relative in existence today.  

The Nicobar pigeon resides in Southeast Asia and the Pacific, from the Indian Nicobar Islands eastward to places like Thailand and Papua New Guinea. Although its exact population count is unclear, the species is in decline because of deforestation and the release of non-native predators (like rats and cats) to these islands. The Nicobar pigeon is now considered “near threatened” with conservation efforts proposed to help the birds thrive again.

See more pictures of these colorful birds at My Modern Met. -via the Presurfer

(Image credit: Flickr user Steve Wilson)


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Star Trek Beyond Classic

Darth Blender took the audio from the trailer for the new movie Star Trek Beyond, featuring music from the Beastie Boys, and mixed it with video from the Star Trek: The Original Series (1966-69).

(YouTube link) https://youtu.be/TBQ2rcrq9iY

The results are just right. You’ve got the nostalgia factor, because who would pass up a chance to see the original Kirk, Spock, and company in their youth? Plus the synchronization is really impressive. -via Geeks Are Sexy


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Dietetic Idiomatic Schematic

The title is a fancy way of saying “chart of food idioms.” This is the latest comic from John Atkinson at Wrong Hands. I see a glaring omission right off: Easy As Pie, which is my favorite flavor of pie. However, if he had actually used a piece of pie, there would be enough idioms to make a complete chart with pie alone. I supposed that would be a pie chart.   


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20 Things You Didn’t Know About Tom Hiddleston

In the past few years, actor Tom Hiddleston is everywhere. You may know him as Loki in the Marvel universe movies, or Jonathon Pine in the miniseries The Night Manager, or Hank Williams in the film I Saw the Light, or any of his many other roles. Maybe we should get to know him a little better.

He went to boarding school with Prince William and Eddie Redmayne.

When Tom was 13-years old, his parents sent him to the elusive Eton College, a well-known boarding school in Windsor. Prince William just happened to be a classmate, as did Eddie Redmayne, who had already started acting professionally. Tom has said that Prince William was treated as any other contemporary would be. While on the subject of Eton College, he has admitted that the way the public perceives Eton, as well as the students who attend the school, irritates him. When asked about the school, he responded, “The reason it’s a good school is that it encourages people to find the thing they love and to go for it. They champion the talent of the individual and that’s what’s special about it.”

Tom used to play rugby at Cambridge.

After playing rugby at Eton, Tom went on to study at the University of Cambridge, the 2nd oldest English-speaking university. While there, he played rugby for the university’s college, Pembroke. Unfortunately, it clashed with his ability to act in the university’s stage productions. In the end, he had to choose one over the other and opted to drop rugby and focus on acting.

That’s just the beginning of the list of twenty things you can learn about Tom Hiddleston at Money Inc.

(Image credit: Gage Skidmore)


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Spending a Year on Mars …Sort Of

A crew of six volunteer scientists spent an entire year isolated in a tent on small section of Hawaii’s Mauna Loa volcano to simulate what life would be like on Mars. They were part of the Hawaii Space Exploration and Analog and Simulation project, called HI-SEAS for short. The 365-day simulation ended Sunday, and the crew was allowed to come outside without a space suit for the first time in a year. Although they have been in contact with "earth" by internet, any messages were delayed by 20 minutes to simulate such communication on Mars. The experiment is about how humans would react under isolation from the outside world, and how they got along with crewmates in cramped conditions. Sheyna Gifford and Tristan Bassingthwaighte talked about their experiences.

Counting down to their so-called “re-entry,” the crew had their sights set on everyday things we Earthlings take for granted ― hugging loved ones, feasting on a burger, swimming in the ocean and running on grass.

In addition to spending time with family and getting outside, Bassingthwaighte’s said he’s looking forward to living in a place with a window.

“I mean holy crap! A whole window that belongs just to me?” he wrote. “I don’t even know what to do with that, we’ve all been sharing a window the size of a medium pizza for the last year.”

In her time away, Gifford said she’s come to realize that the journey to Mars will likely prove more challenging in ways we don’t expect than in ways we do. The good news, she said, is “human beings are pretty much capable of anything.”

Read more about the simulation at HuffPo.

(Image credit: Flickr user University of Hawai‘i News)


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"Heart of Glass" as a '40s Torch Song

(YouTube link)

Postmodern Jukebox specializes in genre-bending versions of familiar songs. Here, they accompany vocalist Addie Hamilton as she gives Blondie's "Heart of Glass" a whole new style. -via Everlasting Blort 


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The Grad Student

Starving from a food-deprived afternoon, the grad student deeply covets the gourmet sandwiches left outside the next workshop.

Picking up sandwiches with great relish, the grad student is caught red-handed by the disgruntled administrative assistant.

Eating his stolen sandwiches in the stairwell, the grad student contemplates how his life has come to this.

There is a graduate student somewhere who is recreating his life in LEGO bricks as a distraction from the drudgery of putting his dissertation together. The Tumblr blog The Grad Student is full of these scenes, with captions. You might want to start reading from the bottom up, as some adventures are told in sequence of multiple posts. Sent it to a grad student you know. -via Metafilter 


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What Thor Was Doing During Captain America: Civil War

When the events of Captain America: Civil War were happening, Thor was taking a break from being a superhero and instead was indulging in real life activities. He’ll be glad to explain them to you.

(YouTube link)

However, it turns out that the "break" wasn’t all his idea. And the situation was complicated by the fact that an ancient Norse god isn’t up on all the latest communication technologies. Maybe the rest of the Marvel superheroes were a bit upset over Thor's pranks pulled on Spider-Man. Anyway, this scenario would make a great sitcom, but only if Chris Hemsworth played the part.  -via reddit


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Why Do We Judge Parents For Putting Kids At Perceived -But Unreal- Risk?

A 9-year-old girl spent all day playing at a park near her home. She had a cell phone and a house key with her, and went home when she got tired. Was that dangerous? It sounds like typical behavior for a 9-year-old. But what if you knew she was there while her mother worked all day? Does that change anything about how dangerous her day at the park appears? An experiment shows that people don’t so much judge such a situation as dangerous because it’s objectivly dangerous, but because of how neglectful the parent appears. In fact, the morality of the reason a parent leaves a child unsupervised directly affects how dangerous the situation is perceived to be. Ashley Thomas, Kyle Stanford, and Barbara Sarnecka of the University of California at Irvine conducted an experiment that showed such bias.

To get at this question experimentally, Thomas and her collaborators created a series of vignettes in which a parent left a child unattended for some period of time, and participants indicated the risk of harm to the child during that period. For example, in one vignette, a 10-month-old was left alone for 15 minutes, asleep in the car in a cool, underground parking garage. In another vignette, an 8-year-old was left for an hour at a Starbucks, one block away from her parent's location.

To experimentally manipulate participants' moral attitude toward the parent, the experimenters varied the reason the child was left unattended across a set of six experiments with over 1,300 online participants. In some cases, the child was left alone unintentionally (for example, in one case, a mother is hit by a car and knocked unconscious after buckling her child into her car seat, thereby leaving the child unattended in the car seat). In other cases, the child was left unattended so the parent could go to work, do some volunteering, relax or meet a lover.

Not surprisingly, the parent's reason for leaving a child unattended affected participants' judgments of whether the parent had done something immoral: Ratings were over 3 on a 10-point scale even when the child was left unattended unintentionally, but they skyrocketed to nearly 8 when the parent left to meet a lover. Ratings for the other cases fell in between.

The researchers were motivated by an increasing number of parents who get into legal trouble for allowing their children to be unsupervised in situations that were once considered normal. The case of the 9-year-old girl was real, and her mother was arrested for child neglect. They talked about the research at NPR, and said the most surprising thing was how judgmental the participants were, and the most judgmental of all were mothers, who also overestimated the risk of danger the most. -via Digg

(Image credit: Flickr user Dave)

See more about baby and kids at NeatoBambino

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Life as a Berserker

The berserkers were a subset of Viking warriors who went into battle wearing wolf or bear skins instead of armor and fought with uncontrollable fury, which is where we get the phrase "going berserk." While in their battle state, they were a danger to even their own compatriots. The berserker fighting style has been attributed to a self-induced trance, drugs, or possibly mental illness. Life couldn’t have been easy for a berserker, especially when they had time to confront moral dilemmas. This comic is from Zach Weinersmith at Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal.


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Before the Breathalyzer There Was the Drunkometer

Did you ever see someone in an old movie blow into a balloon to see how drunk they were? That was part of a device called the Harger Drunkometer. After Prohibition was repealed in the 1930s, police had to deal with an upswing in drunk driving. It was hard to get a conviction without concrete evidence, though, so law enforcement turned to science for help.

Cue Indiana University biochemist and toxicologist Rolla N. Harger, who had been working since 1931 on a machine to put hard evidence behind a police officer’s claim. Harger finally got a patent for the Drunkometer in 1936. The upshot? A person would blow into a balloon, and the air would drop into a chemical solution, with the corresponding color change indicating blood alcohol content. “Instead of banning alcohol, which didn’t work, we look to a device that quantifies just how much drinking is OK,” says Bruce Bustard, who curated “Spirited Republic,” the National Archives exhibit on the history of the U.S. government’s relationship with alcohol.

The Drunkometer was used until the Breathalyzer came on the market in the 1950s. Read about the first case in which a Drunkometer was used at Ozy.

(Image credit: Florida Memory)


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Fisherman Lands 17-foot Sawfish

Josh Jorgensen knew he had a really big fish on the line, but when he finally saw it, he was a bit shocked. It was a sawfish, which is a critically endangered species. Jorgensen called the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission for advice. They told him to record the location it was caught via GPS, try to estimate its size, and cut the line as close to the fish as they could without getting hurt.

(YouTube link)

The fish appeared to be about 17 feet long and weighed 700 pounds. When Jorgensen tried to cut the line with a pair of bolt cutters, the sawfish knocked them right out of his hands! But they did manage to free the fish. The screenshot above is when he grabbed the fish’s tail and the fish said, “Do you mind!?” -via reddit


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The Fourth Olympic Medal

 

On August 16, New Zealand runner Nikki Hamblin collided with American Abbey D’Agostino as they were running the first heat of the 5,000-meter race at the Rio Olympics. D’Agostino jumped up quickly, but instead of running off, she helped Hamlin to her feet and told her she had to finish the race. But D’Agostino had injured her ankle. Hamlin held back to help her make it to the finish line.

 

Despite finishing last and next-to last in the heat, both women were cleared to advance in the competition. However, D’Agostino had torn thee ligaments and could not race. Both Hamlin and D’Agostino were awarded the Pierre de Coubertin medal. It’s a rare Olympic medal awarded for extraordinary sportsmanship, and it’s only been bestowed 17 times before, beginning in 1964. Pierre de Coubertin was the founder of the International Olympic Committee. Each of those awards has an amazing story behind it, and you can read the stories of all the winners at Metafilter.


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On Being Hated

How do you handle haters? In the 3D world, you can avoid such people -if you ever even learn they are don't like you. It’s not so easy on the internet, where so many people have access to so many other people and most of them remain anonymous.

(YouTube link)

The School of Life looks at why criticism, contempt, and hatred bother us so much. Many people come across as haters when they really just don’t know how to criticize wisely, while others are just trolls. And how we respond to online criticism or hatred is key to learning to handle the feelings it brings. -via Digg


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The Movie Pitch

Hollywood seems to have lost the art of originality. Or at least, lost the art of greenlighting original stories. In the decade between 2004 and 2014, the number of movie releases that were sequels, prequels, remakes, or reboots doubled, and 2016 has even more. In fact, there are 252 planned sequels, prequels, remakes, and reboots between now and 2020. The reason is money, of course. A familiar universe based on an successful existing franchise is a safer bet than an unknown. Studios take that into account, and so do distributors, and so do moviegoers, because they are all risking more money than ever before on theatrical entertainment. This is the latest comic from Thor’s Thundershack.  -via Geeks Are Sexy


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The Fierce, Forgotten Library Wars of the Ancient World

One of the reasons we have ancient Greek literature at all was the competition between the kings of the Greek Empire. After Alexander the Great expanded the Greek Empire to its apex, regional rulers wanted to display their fitness to succeed him. A library full of classic texts was one way to signal the world that your city was the most educated and cultured. However, those charged with building the collections of their libraries, particularly those of Alexandria and Pergamon, weren’t above using force or shenanigans.

“The Ptolemies aimed to make the collection a comprehensive repository of Greek writings as well as a tool for research,” wrote former classics professor at New York University, Lionel Casson in Libraries of the Ancient World. To obtain this comprehensive collection, “the Ptolemies’ solution was money and royal highhandedness.”

During the Ptolemaic hunt for centuries-old books from Greece, it’s said that a new industry emerged of forging ancient books to look more antique, thereby increasing the rarity and value. While the evidence of such a forgery trade is difficult to determine, Coqueugniot finds it probable since the kings were so bent on having the most prestigious texts in their library.

To us, those books are all ancient, forgery or not. Libraries also competed for resident scholars, offering high salaries for those who would come and imprisoning those who might leave. Read about the Greek library wars at Atlas Obscura.


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Why You Shouldn’t Drive Slowly in the Left Lane

(Note: this video is only aimed at drivers in countries where you drive on the right.) When you drive down an interstate highway, you constantly see signs that say “slower traffic keep right” or “use left lane for passing only.” There’s a reason for this. The narrator of this video apparently had never heard of the rule, which says something about his driving instructor, and also tells us that he does not read signs.  

(YouTube link)

Nevertheless, there will be people who prefer to use the left lane of a four-lane road because the pavement is better. Or they are afraid that the right lane will end. Or they are going the speed limit, and no one should go faster than that. None of those reasons are good for the flow of traffic. Feel free to send this video to someone who needs it. The next lesson: turn signals.  -via reddit 


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13 Behind-the-Scenes Secrets of Park Rangers

As the U.S. National Park Service turns 100 years old, we are learning more and more about the parks, like the questions over crime jurisdiction in Yellowstone and how it became the first National Park. Now let’s learn something about the park rangers who work in our national parks.  

9. THE FIELD IS HIGHLY COMPETITIVE.

Even those who put in the hard work to become a ranger might not get a job or get placed where they want to be. According to Gifford, “There is so much competition for every single position within the agency. One of my coworkers applied to 90 different jobs before getting on with us.”

As far as compensation goes, it varies quite a bit based on the location and scope of the park, the position itself, and the employee's education history. Most NPS jobs—like other government jobs—have their pay based on the General Schedule pay scale [PDF]. But while most on the GS pay scale are full-time workers, many parks employees are seasonal, meaning they have to find work in other areas during the off-season. For a few specific examples of jobs (and their pay brackets) check out the USAJOBS site; some positions are hourly while others are salaried.

10. A PARK RANGER DOESN’T NECESSARILY WORK FOR THE NATIONAL PARK SERVICE.

Of course, not every park with a ranger falls under the umbrella of the NPS. There’s also the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the National Wildlife Refuge System, and other state agencies that employ the term “park ranger.” It might seem like a small distinction, but the agencies have different approaches and missions, which means their rangers can have different roles and responsibilities. For example, while national parks emphasize preservation and work under the Department of Interior, the US Forest Service is under the Department of Agriculture and is focused on both preservation and uses—such as lumber, cattle grazing, and mining.

Read more about the life of a park ranger at mental_floss.


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The Hapless Explorer Who Helped Create the National Park System

In 1870, a group of prominent citizens of the Montana Territory set out on an expedition to map the area known as the Yellowstone country. The Washburn Expedition hoped to confirm or disavow the tall tales of geysers, boiling lakes, and other wonders. Among their number was one Truman Everts, who was very nearsighted and totally unsuited for a wilderness experdition.    

A desk-jockey all his life, Everts had run the Montana Territory’s Internal Revenue department in Helena for the past five years. The Grant administration wanted its own man collecting taxes in Montana, though, and by the summer of 1870, the taxman had been unemployed for seven months. Enamored with the idea of exploring the unknown with Montana’s fellow leading citizens, the middle-aged widower enthusiastically joined the Washburn Expedition. The jaunt into the unknown was to be “sort of a between-jobs vacation for him,” Whittlesey says. Little did Everts know his holiday would become a comic wilderness odyssey—think The Revenant meets National Lampoon’s Vacation—of grit, luck, and utter incompetence that would, against all odds, help lead to the creation of the nation’s first national park.

The first thing Everts did was fall behind the group and become lost. Then his horse ran away with his supplies. The rest of the expedition looked for him for a week, then decided he must have frozen to death. With neither tools nor supplies, Everts continued the best he could. When a prospector found him 37 days later, Everts weighed only 50 pounds. The story of his terrifying time alone in the wilderness, strangely, aided the push to make Yellowstone the United States’ first national park in 1872. Read about Everts’ ordeal at Outside.  

(Image credit: Erin Wilson)


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Men Fells Neighbor's Tree, Ruins Own Home

Raymond Mazzarella of Pittston Township, Pennsylvania, was upset that his neighbor’s tree was dripping sap on Mazzarella’s car. Saturday afternoon, he took a chainsaw and cut through the tree’s 36-inch trunk. The tree fell on Mazzarella’s apartment building, rendering it uninhabitable and leaving five people homeless.

Police said Mazzarella was being checked out at a hospital. Upon his release Monday afternoon, a neighbor saw Mazzarella trespassing near the apartment house and called police. When the neighbor confronted him, Mazzarella punched him. The neighbor pulled out a stun gun to protect himself. Mazzarella then started hitting him with a baseball bat.

Mazzarella is charged with assault and harassment and is locked up in the Luzerne County jail on $10,000 bail.

The Red Cross is providing the other apartment residents with temporary housing. -via Arbroath


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Dancing Pokémon

An animation of Dragonite and Charizard dancing has Twitter users trying to one-up each other with the music they add.

Ashley Feinberg has a roundup of the Pokémon dancers set to various songs (post title contains NSFW language). But it doesn’t contain “All Star” by Smash Mouth. -via Metafilter

BTW: Enlarging this video caused Sandyra's screen to freeze. Besides, it looks better small size.


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The Top 10 Scuba Diving Spots in the World

Once you’ve learned to scuba dive and invested in the necessary equipment, you’ll certainly want to explore the undersea world. The rest of us can just dream of seeing some of the most beautiful undersea sights around the globe. Check out some destinations for scuba divers and what they have to offer. Somewhere in the middle of the list is Bikini Atoll.

Many know Bikini Atoll as the site of nuclear weapons testing in the mid 1900s, but now it’s a popular spot for those who want to explore wrecks while deep water scuba diving. The area is a veritable graveyard of different ships that you can swim around, including naval ships from World War II. The waters are clear enough to search what’s below, and even today those who dive there commonly find well preserved historical artifacts and other items.

Read the rest at Money, Inc.


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Duet with a Parrot

(YouTube link)

A Brazilian musician sings with his parrot, who knows the songs and even harmonizes in places! I’d like to know how long they’ve been making music together for the bird to be such a good performer. -via Digg

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

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Tattoo Cover-Ups

So you got a tattoo, and it isn’t right. The artist wasn’t as good as you thought they were, you changed your mind about the design, or it started to fade over time. You could get expensive and painful laser treatments, or you could find a much better tattoo artist and do a cover-up design. Buzzfeed asked readers to submit pictures of their regrettable tattoos and the cover-ups. Some are just plain awesome. The tattoo shown here has an intermediate image that shows where the old one is under the cover-up, but many other original tats are impossible to find in the “after” pictures. See 24 “before and after” pictures of tattoo cover-ups.


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The Top 8 Tastiest Mascots

Forget trojans, lions, or bulldogs. Nothing’s more intimidating than a mascot capable of giving you food poisoning.

1. FIGHTING PICKLE

When the University of North carolina School of the Arts needed a name for its 1972 intramural team, they honored pickles. The school still lacks an athletic program. Or as Chancellor JohnMauceri said in 2012, "The fighting pickles are peerless and remain undefeated."

2. FIGHTING OKRA

(YouTube link)

Delta State University’s official team name is the “Statesmen,” but when students realized that a politician didn’t stir fear in opponents, they chose vegetable meanus, “a large, prickly, bipedal vegetable with an inherently bad temperament.”

3. KERNEL COBB

Continue reading

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John Lennon’s First Acid Trip

In the spring of 1965, dentist John Riley slipped LSD into after dinner tea for John Lennon, George Harrison, and their wives Cynthia and Patti. John Lennon later recalled the experience in a radio interview, which became the narration for this animation.



(video link)

Rolling Stone has some thoughts from the others who were present, and the story of what happened afterward. John and George introduced LSD to Ringo that summer, but Paul resisted until the next year. That fact created some problems in the group as they worked on their next album, Revolver. -via Uproxx


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400 Years of Equator Hazings

The subject of crossing the equator came up in a discussion of the Rio Olympics, and we all slightly recalled that you had to go through some kind of ritual, but no one could recall what they heard it was. We figured it varied by the organization you were with. Ben Marks went through that experience recently on a French research vessel and lived to tell about it. Then he did more research on such rituals, which are really a form of hazing. Marks talked to Dr. Simon Bronner of Penn State University, author of Crossing the Line: Violence, Play, and Drama in Naval Equator Traditions.

“Well, I can give you a manifest reason and a latent reason for the practice,” Bronner begins, referring to the obvious and subconscious justifications for the tradition. “The manifest reason is around the idea that the equator itself is some kind of a liminal twilight zone, if you will, because its latitude is 0, 0, 0. There is a certain religio-magical connotation to the equator, so the ceremony is a way to indicate that one is traveling not only through space but also time, through some kind of a liminal reversal zone.”

For the record, Pascal never mentioned anything about liminal reversal zones when he was binding my wrists, smashing raw eggs on my head and face, or offering me a sip of water after I’d been standing in the sun for an hour, only to find out that it was seawater. After I realized what I was about to swallow, I spat the stuff in his face, which elicited from Pascal a loud, staccato laugh, and earned me another wink.

“Latently,” Bronner continues, “there is a lot of tension when you’re on a ship because you’re in this master-servant role. On a ship, the idea of discipline and obedience is much more emphasized than in other branches of the armed forces because a ship is a danger zone—discipline and obedience can save lives. So, I think the ceremony is partly a release from all that. Often the officers who are crossing the equator for the first time are treated the harshest. But there is a sense among the participants that there is license to do many of the ceremony’s activities within the framework of play that you couldn’t do anywhere else. The activities serve as an equalizer and ice breaker, especially in institutions, organizations, or groups whose members are strangers to one another.”

Collectors Weekly has a history of equator crossing rituals, and a blow-by-blow description of Marks’ two-hour ordeal -with pictures.


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Free Bear Hugs

Comedian and prankster Stuart Edge (previously at Neatorama) bought a couple of big bears from Costco and used one as a bear costume. That’s a great opportunity to go out and offer free bear hugs!

(YouTube link)

But that’s not all. Edge also shows off some moves at a skate park, which can’t be easy wearing a plush bear. At least when he falls, he has plenty of padding! -via Tastefully Offensive 


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The Best 100 Films of the 21st Century

It might seem a little premature to be ranking the films of the century, but there’s nothing wrong with ranking the films of the past 16 years. A list at BBC Culture used the input of 177 movie critics from 36 countries. Yes, they included movies from 2000, although some will argue whether that year is in the 21st century. At the top of the list:

10. No Country for Old Men (Joel and Ethan Coen, 2007)
9. A Separation (Asghar Farhadi, 2011)
8. Yi Yi: A One and a Two (Edward Yang, 2000)
7. The Tree of Life (Terrence Malick, 2011)
6. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Michel Gondry, 2004)
5. Boyhood (Richard Linklater, 2014)
4. Spirited Away (Hayao Miyazaki, 2001)
3. There Will Be Blood (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2007)
2. In the Mood for Love (Wong Kar-wai, 2000)
1. Mulholland Drive (David Lynch, 2001)

Check out the entire list of 100 movies and how the list was compiled at BBC Culture. If you’re like me, you might want to save the list for future use when you have time on a weekend, or for when you retire.  

 


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Profile for Miss Cellania

  • Member Since 2012/08/04


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