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The Debuts and Early Performances of 20 Future Stars

Neatorama presents a guest post from actor, comedian, and voiceover artist Eddie Deezen. Visit Eddie at his website or at Facebook.

 The most famous show business performers in history are no different than the unknowns, the obscures and the lesser knowns. Every performer has one thing in common- they all made their debut somewhere or other, whether auspicious or less so. Like they say, everyone has to start some place. Let's take a look at the show biz debuts and earliest performances of twenty stars.

1. Groucho Marx   

Groucho (pictured at right) had an early gig singing in a protestant church choir. This worked out well until they found out he was Jewish and fired him.

2. Harpo Marx

Groucho's older brother Harpo (on the left) made his debut at Coney Island at the age of 19. He was hijacked from his safe job as a piano player in a nickelodeon movie theater and tossed on stage to accompany his brothers, Groucho and Gummo (and another  singer named Lou Levy), as one of the Four Nightingales. Harpo was so scared he wet his pants. Harpo called it "the most wretched debut in the history off show business."

3. Sylvester Stallone

Sly got his first acting gig playing Smokey the Bear in a school play.

4. Elvis Presley

Elvis Presley's first-ever performance as a singer was in a singing contest at the Mississippi-Alabama Fair & Dairy Show. He was ten years old at the time. Dressed as a cowboy and wearing glasses, Elvis stood on a chair to reach the microphone. He sang Red Foley's "Old Shep" and won fifth prize in the contest. His prize was $5.00 plus a free ticket to all the rides at the fair.

5. Orson Welles

Orson's earliest public performance happened before he was ten years old. He appeared dressed as Peter Rabbit in the store window of Marshall Fields department store in Chicago. He was paid $25 a day.

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Things Cats Don't Like

When a cat has a poor opinion of something, they will let you know, clearly, in their own way. In this complication video from the Pet Collective, you'll see cats hating on modern technology, toys, food, family members, and everyday objects.

(YouTube link)

To be fair, some of these clips aren't so much dislike for objects, but more of a cat wanting to see how much destruction and chaos they can cause. Yet we still love them.

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

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If Theme Parks Were Honest

Sooner or later, just about every family takes a road trip to Six Flags, Disney World, or some other large theme park to show the kids a good time. That means standing in line for a hour to ride a one-minute ride, paying out the wazoo for lunch, and dealing with tired, cranky kids (or even worse, bored teenagers) and sunburn. There's a price to pay for everything.

(YouTube link)

In the latest Honest Ad from Cracked, Roger Horton dresses up like Walt Disney and welcomes us to Hortonland, where all your dreams will come true- even if they are nightmares.  


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Avocado + Latte = Avolatte



The latest hipster food obsession is the "avolatte," a latte (which is a fancy term for coffee with milk) served in an avocado shell. Developed at the Truman Cafe in Melbourne, the idea has spread through the internet and around the world, pretty much instantly.

It appears to be an eco-friendly way to add a bit of avocado flavor to the drink, but not everyone likes the idea. Personally, I do not like avocado, and I do like having a handle on my coffee cup. -via Laughing Squid

(Image credit: ozeatingwa)

We dish up more neat food posts at the Neatolicious blog

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Dog Interrupts Russian News Broadcast

This news anchor at the Russian channel MIR 24 is telling us about the planned renovation of some areas of Moscow, when she's interrupted by a Labrador retriever that had snuck behind the desk. It was startling.

(YouTube link)

She tries to keep her cool and continue with the news, but all the attention is on the dog. Finally, she ends this clip by explaining that this is why she is a cat person. It's not nice to be upstaged. -via Tastefully Offensive


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Cosplay Mashup: Yondu is Mary Poppins

Cosplayer Cindy Salvus Artistry took a few lines from Guardians of the Galaxy 2 and made it a real thing. The character Yondu is mashed up with Mary Poppins! Here's the dialogue from the movie:

Star-Lord: You look like Mary Poppins.
Yondu: Is he cool?
Star-Lord: Hell yeah, he’s cool.
Yondu: I’m Mary Poppins, y’all!

And he certainly is. You can see more pictures of the character at Facebook and Instagram.

-via Geeks Are Sexy


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The True Story of Brainwashing and How It Shaped America

The word "brainwashing" came about because of the Cold War. In the 1950s, Americans were shocked when thousands of soldiers captured by North Korea eventually confessed to war crimes they hadn't committed, and some even refused to return to the US when the war was  over. That was unthinkable.

Suddenly the threat of brainwashing was very real, and it was everywhere. The U.S. military denied the charges made in the soldiers’ “confessions,” but couldn’t explain how they’d been coerced to make them. What could explain the behavior of the soldiers besides brainwashing? The idea of mind control flourished in pop culture, with movies like Invasion of the Body Snatchers and The Manchurian Candidate showing people whose minds were wiped and controlled by outside forces. FBI director J. Edgar Hoover referred to thought-control repeatedly in his book Masters of Deceit: The Story of Communism in America and How to Fight It. By 1980 even the American Psychiatric Association had given it credence, including brainwashing under “dissociative disorders” in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-III. Had Chinese and Soviet Communists really uncovered a machine or method to rewrite men’s minds and supplant their free will?

The short answer is no—but that didn’t stop the U.S. from pouring resources into combatting it.

“The basic problem that brainwashing is designed to address is the question ‘why would anybody become a Communist?’” says Timothy Melley, professor of English at Miami University and author of The Covert Sphere: Secrecy, Fiction, and the National Security State. “[Brainwashing] is a story that we tell to explain something we can’t otherwise explain.”

Brainwashing seemed like mystical mind-control magic to the American public, although psychological change can be readily explained by simpler concepts, from persuasion to indoctrination to torture. The US government went into overdrive to research brainwashing in the 1950s, which you can read about at Smithsonian.


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How the Beatles Wrote "A Day in the Life"

This coming Friday, May 26, will be the 50th anniversary of the release of the Beatles album Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. The Atlantic takes a close look at one of its most memorable songs, "A Day in the Life." It's no sing-along, but more of an anthem that reflects the many changes the Beatles had gone through since finding fame in the early '60s. For example, John Lennon makes himself into an observer of life from inside a bubble instead of a participant.  

That’s how he was writing, beachcombing inspiration from headlines and news briefs in the January 17 Daily Mail, which he had open at his piano (for this song); from a circus poster hanging in his home (“Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite”); from a cereal advertisement (“Good Morning Good Morning”); from his child’s drawing (“Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds”). In the song, the young man whose death gets noticed in the newspaper references an acquaintance of the Beatles, a Guinness beer company heir named Tara Browne, who crashed his Lotus sports car at high speed. Lennon reimagines Browne into the half-recognizable, presumably upper-class man who has it made and then throws it all away. What does it say that one crowd is transfixed by a privileged stranger’s grisly demise, but another crowd rejects a film about the achievement of a generation, the world war won? Only the singer of the song is willing to go back there, and only because he’s read the book.

There are many layers to the song, deconstructed in an article at the Atlantic. -via Metafilter

(Image credit: Maclen Music)


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The Romantic Engineer

Dane Christianson (ChraneD) posted this gif to reddit's shitty robots forum with the title How to properly ask out the Queen of Shitty Robots. Of course, he's referring to Simone Giertz, whose ridiculous robots we've posted a few times. Gertz was rendered speechless for a nanosecond, then said,

Which everyone considers a win among engineers.


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The Lady of the Lines

The following is an article from Uncle John's Unstoppable Bathroom Reader.

(Image credit: Bybbisch94, Christian Gebhardt)

If you've ever heard of the Nazca lines, you have this woman to thank for preserving them for posterity. And if you've ever doubted that one person can make a difference, think again…

HELP WANTED

In 1932, a 20-year-old German woman named Maria Reiche answered a newspaper ad and landed a job in Peru, tutoring the sons of the German consul. After that, she bounced from job to job and eventually found work translating documents for an archaeologist named Julio Tello.

One day she happened to overhear a conversation between Tello and another archaeologist, Toribio Mejia. Mejia described some mysterious lines he'd seen in a patch of desert about 250 miles south of the capital of Lima, near the small town of Nazca. He tried to interest Tello in the lines, but Tello dismissed them as unimportant. Reiche wasn't so sure. She decided to go to Nazca and have a look for herself.

MYSTERIOUS LINES

(Image credit: PIERRE ANDRE LECLERCQ)

Gazing across the desert floor, Reiche was amazed at what she saw: More than 1,000 lines crisscrossing 200 square miles of desert, some as narrow as footpaths, others more than 15 feet wide. Many ran almost perfectly straight for miles across the desert, deviating as little as four yards in a mile.

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How TV Logos Were Made Before Computers

In the 21st century, we are so used to computers being able to create an image of anything that we forget what a hassle that used to be. For 2D logos, that meant drawing, paste-ups, and photography. For film, it was more complicated because you wanted a 3D effect, or at least some hint or possibility of movement. Co.Design put together several videos and discussions of how TV logos were made of actual physical objects created to brand the channel, then filmed to give them an identity that everyone would recognize. See how the logos of RTF, BBC, and HBO were created.


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Toy Story 19

Toy Story 4 is planned for 2019. That's 24 years after the first movie. You have to wonder how long they can keep it up. This comic from Berkeley Mews gives us an idea of how the story might be ultimately wrapped up. Too bad it's an animated horror film. -via Geeks Are Sexy


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Hugh Jackman Didn't Know Wolverines Were Real Animals

When Hugh Jackman was first cast as the X-Men character Wolverine, he went to work researching the animal. But he did that research on wolves.  

“I didn’t even know there was a wolverine. I literally, embarrassingly did about two weeks of research on wolves. I was rehearsing for three weeks and I was shooting, so I was kind of on my own. I remember going past an IMAX in Toronto, and there was an IMAX documentary about wolves, and so I thought, ‘I’ll go and see that,'” Jackman said Wednesday.

When they stared shooting 2000’s “X-Men,” director Bryan Singer noticed something wasn’t right with Jackman’s performance.

“He said, ‘Are you sort of walking funny, what’s going on?’ And I said, ‘I’ve been doing this thing with wolves,’ and he goes, ‘You know you’re not a wolf, right?'” Jackman recalled.

Singer found out that Jackman didn't know wolverines existed as their own species. A trip to a zoo was in order. To be fair, there are no wolverines in Australia. That was 17 years ago; we can assume that Jackman knows all about wolverines now. Read the entire story at Page Six. -via The A.V. Club


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Elderly Feral Tomcat and Foster Kittens

Mason the feral cat was ill, injured, and infected when he was taken in by Tinykittens feral TNR program (previously at Neatorama). Because of his condition, he was placed in a home instead of being returned to the feral colony. Mason is only semi-tamed; he still won't let anyone pet him.  

(YouTube link)

But he has adopted a litter of kittens placed in the same foster home. They make him happy. There are several more videos of Grandpa Mason and his kittens at Tiny Tuxies.  -via reddit

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

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That Time a Basketball Player Saved a Dolphin

More than ten years ago, we posted a story about 7' 9" Bao Xishun saving the lives of dophins by sticking his long arm down their throats to retrieve plastic they'd swallowed. It turns out there's precedent for this type of heroism. In 1978, Marine World called in Clifford Ray of the Golden State Warriors, famous for his long arms, in to save a dolphin that had swallowed a bolt! Read about the incident, and see a video, at Weird Universe.


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Stages of the Reader

The process of getting kids to read was addressed by Lunarbaboon the other day. Grant Snider takes it a bit further and plots out the way we relate to reading throughout our lives. This comic is from Snider's Incidental Comics. You can get this comic in print or poster form; it would be a great gift for a teacher or librarian.


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The Secret Life of Dutch King Willem-Alexander

When Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands abdicated in 2013, her son Willem-Alexander became king. Few people knew until this week that he was a pilot, and has continued flying Fokker 70 planes for KLM after he ascended the throne. Willem-Alexander has been a co-pilot on KLM flights twice a month for 21 years, yet passengers had no idea who was in the cockpit.  

Willem-Alexander once said that if he had not been born in a palace, his dream would have been to fly a big passenger plane such as a Boeing 747, so it is no surprise that he intends to retrain for the updated plane.

He told De Telegraaf that he never used his name when addressing passengers and was rarely recognised in uniform and wearing his KLM cap. However, he admitted that some passengers had recognised his voice.

"The advantage is that I can always say that I warmly welcome passengers on behalf of the captain and crew," he said. "Then I don't have to give my name."

He maintains his flying schedule in order to keep his pilot's license. Read more about the king's second job at BBC News.


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Flappers Didn’t Really Wear Fringed Dresses

The latest movie version of The Great Gatsby came out, fashion historians set us straight about flapper fashions: they did not show off one's curves the way the movie costumes did. It turns out that the most iconic signifier of a flapper costume is also false: the fringe. It wasn't common at all in the Roaring Twenties. They didn't have the lightweight, synthetic fabrics that gave us fringe that swirled when dancing. So why do we always think of fringe when we think of flapper fashion? It was the movies.

“Hollywood began mining the 1920s in the 1950s, and order to make it work, they adapted the costuming of the period to look more like what people were actually wearing in the ’50s,” explains Jeanine Basinger, a film historian and the chair of Wesleyan University’s film department. The period setting, Basinger says, was less about what the ’20s were and more about what they weren’t: post-WWII. “The war was a shadow over film at the time, and to take the ’20s as a setting lifted that burden off.”

Read how movies such as Singin' in the Rain and other musicals changed our perception of fashion history at Racked.


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Medieval Death Bot

Several times a day, we get a new yet old obituary from a bot that Tweets reports of deaths at Medieval Death Bot. They aren't limited to royalty or any particular class, and include deaths from sources available on the web. The causes of death are intriguing, as they raise more questions than can possibly be answered.

The account, developed by Soren Häxan, also has a related Tumblr blog with information answering questions that arise about medieval deaths. For example, here's a post on why so many people were killed by "clerks." 

Most of the deaths are violent, as deaths from natural causes appear to be excluded unless they are particularly interesting. -via b3ta


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Getting to Know the Cast of the FX Hit Legion

Legion is an FX series that is connected to the Marvel group X-Men. It centers around a superhero who suffers from mental illness in that his superpowers are controlled by different personalities. Whatever you think of multiple personality disorder, that is an intriguing idea for a mutant superhero. The show is doing really well, so if you've just started watching or are looking for a new show to try out, you'll want to learn something about Legion, like who's in it.

For those who are unfamiliar with the name, Dan Stevens is best-known for his roles as Matthew Crawley on Downton Abbey and the Beast in the live adaptation of Beauty and the Beast. He plays David Haller, the titular character who was diagnosed with schizophrenia at a young age. As a result, Stevens went to great lengths to prepare for the role, ranging from speaking with both doctors and people with mental health issues to remaining in the dark about key details of the character and plot so as to achieve a more genuine sense of confusion about what is going on.

Read about the four actresses who play the characters around Haller on Legion at TVOM.


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Coke Habit

Mike was addicted to Coca Cola and didn't even know it until the went through withdrawal. When his mother quit buying Coke to save his teeth, he suffered from two weeks of migraines.

(vimeo link)

That was a long time ago, and he still can't drink caffeine. He finally made a cartoon about it. You can read more about the video here-Thanks, Nick!


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The Real Case that Gave Poe a Murder Mystery

The following article is from the book Uncle John's True Crime: A Classic Collection of Crooks, Cops, and Capers.

How did New York City, a famous cigar girl, and Edgar Allan Poe combine to create one of the world’s first murder mystery stories? Read on.

PROLOGUE

Anyone who enjoys murder mysteries owes a debt of gratitude to Edgar Allan Poe. Before there was a Sherlock Holmes or a Nancy Drew, before the word “detective” was even in common usage, Poe created the character of C. Auguste Dupin, an eccentric Parisian genius who solved murder cases that baffled the city’s police force. Dupin first appeared in April of 1841 in a short story called “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” and reappeared in two more stories after that. To create his detective stories, Poe did plenty of research on real crimes, including one of his century’s most notorious murder mysteries.

CHAPTER ONE: THE BODY

On July 28, 1841, the body of 21-year-old Mary Cecilia Rogers was found floating in the Hudson River near Hoboken, New Jersey. The discovery was shocking, not just because the body was battered beyond recognition (she could be identified only by her clothing and a birthmark on her arm), but because Rogers was famous in New York City. One of America’s first celebrities, she was nicknamed the “beautiful cigar girl.”

Until shortly before her death, Rogers had worked at a huge tobacco and cigar shop on Broadway. She had an unusual job: enticing men into the shop. According to legend, she was so beautiful that men would come inside just to see her, and wouldn’t leave without buying tobacco. Some of those admirers even published poems in local papers, singing of her charms. One besotted “poet” wrote, “She’s picked for her beauty from many a belle / And placed near the window Havanas to sell.” Other patrons were more talented, including New York City newspaper reporters and a writer named Edgar Allan Poe.

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Shed of the Year Finalists

The Brits are quite proud of their sheds, so Shedblog holds a Shed of the Year competition annually (which we've covered before). The 2017 finalists have been announced, and you can vote for your favorite shed here. See a gallery of large photos of the finalists at the Guardian, but be warned that the most interesting sheds are found in the contest category called #Notashed. There are also categories for Eco, Workshop/Studio, Unexpected, Cabin/Summerhouse, Pub/Entertainment, Historic, and Budget. -via Metafilter

(Image credit: Anderson Jones)


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The True Story Behind Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler and Her Mixed-Up Files

The E.L. Konigsburg children's book From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler was released fifty years ago. It won the Newberry Medal in 1968, and has been a staple of childhood reading ever since. It has inspired thousands of children to visit and enjoy the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. If you remember the book, or read it to your children, you'll want to know about the author and what inspired her.

Elaine Lobl (E.L.) was born in Manhattan in 1930, but grew up in small-town Pennsylvania. She earned a degree in chemistry from the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, and married industrial psychologist David Konigsburg in 1952. But a career in science wasn’t to be. She had trouble with the lab work; her son Paul says more than once, she blew the sink up—and lost her eyebrows—mixing the wrong elements.. So Elaine became a stay-at-home mother of three, and while living in Port Chester, New York, decided to start writing.

“When we were in grade school, Mom would write in the morning. When the three of us kids would come home for lunch, she would read what she wrote,” says Paul Konigsburg, 62. “If we laughed she kept it in. If not, she rewrote it.”

The Met has paid tribute to Konigsburg and her work many times, and will host a couple of special events for the book's anniversary this summer. Read about Konigsburg and her best seller at Smithsonian.


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Star Wars Nothing But Star Wars Mixtape Trailer

Cinefamily TV is putting together a mega-project for the 40th anniversary of Star Wars, featuring 70 minutes of the most bonkers Star Wars-related footage possible. The trailer gives us a little taste, and although it's less than two minutes long, it's weird enough to enjoy on its own.

(YouTube link)

Forty years is a long time to be obsessed with one franchise, but plenty long enough to amass tributes that will make us laugh and feel nostalgic at the same time. The full version will be shown May 25th at the Cinefamily theater in Los Angeles. -via Gizmodo 


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Home in a Can: When Trailers Offered a Compact Version of the American Dream

People buy trailers to go camping in or to live in more permanently, but while the two living styles have diverged, the trailers they use overlap a lot. Tiny campers are used as permanent homes, while vacation travel trailers can be bigger than many site-built homes. Mike Closen and John Brunkowski are such trailer enthusiasts that they've written seven books on the subject, the latest being Don’t Call Them Trailer Trash: The Illustrated Mobile Home Story. Closen tells the story of how Americans fell in love with trailers.

Closen: In the late 19th century, we started having campgrounds and campsites in the U.S. and Canada, and tent campers were often delivered to the site via train. The wealthiest people in Canada and England continued to go on extended tours of the countryside by rail up until the late 1930s and early ’40s. Instead of using a travel trailer or tent, they would hire an entire lavishly appointed train car, and they brought their servants to attend to them. Their train car would be towed along, and then placed on a railroad siding for a period of time so the tourists could see the sights. Then the car would be picked up by another train and towed to the next location for a sizable sum of money. It was, again, a sort of mobile home. At least temporarily, these rich folk were living out of a train car.

When automobiles were first mass-produced in the United States around 1900, Americans who could afford vehicles began auto camping. You used your car as part of the camper. People would drive their car down the road, stop somewhere remote on the roadside, and then set up a tent-like contraption. Sometimes they attached a canvas sheet to the top of the car and then propped the other side up with poles. Sometimes they’d park two cars next to one another and stretch a canvas between the tops of the cars.

On the very earliest truck chassis, people would build shelters that had fold-out devices similar to today’s slide-outs that could be covered in tent canvas. By the 1920s, Americans were making their own trailers they could attach to the back of their cars and tow. These early trailers tended to be very short because you didn’t have a very powerful vehicle to pull it. They were rickety contraptions, built of every conceivable material, mostly wood and the sort of canvas that would have been used on a covered wagon.

Collectors Weekly: Where did the campers go?

Closen: They’d show up in established parks or pull over to the side of the road and camp on empty-seeming farmland, although certainly they were trespassing on private property. By the 1920s, a lot of municipalities figured out that all these people traveling along the roadways needed a place to go. Several thousand parks or camps sprang up along the highways of America. Those would’ve had primitive outhouse facilities, but not much more than that. With each passing year and decade, those facilities expanded and improved. Almost immediately, as building trailers to camp and reside in caught on, there was an instant parallel growth and development of places for them to go. They were called tourist parks, trailer parks, tourist camps, and fish camps—which, by the way, didn’t help. That was more of the trailer-trash stereotype: “Oh, there’s a fish camp down the road where you can stay.”

Along the way, the tourism industry grew up to serve the campers, and communities were established for more permanent mobile homes. Read the story of the trailer at Collectors Weekly.


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The Mystery of the 2,000-Year-Old Iron Beads

In 1945, an excavation of a Native American mound in Illinois revealed around a thousand shell and pearl beads, and 22 beads iron beads. Where did those come from? The people that lived there 2,000 years ago, as the artifacts were dated, did not have a culture of metallurgy. They came from a meteorite, one the rare meteors that contain iron. Only three such meteorites have ever been found in North America.

A piece of one of those three meteorites, the Anoka meteorite, was first discovered in 1961, next to the Mississippi River in what is now Anoka, Minnesota. Its surface didn’t show evidence of people trying to remove bits and pieces of it, and its chemical makeup was just different enough from the beads to convince scientists it wasn’t the source. Another chunk of the Anoka turned up in 1983. A new analysis of that piece, which was found just across the river from the original, showed the researchers, from the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., the same internal structure observed in the Havana Hopewell beads. Mass spectroscopy then confirmed that the two pieces of iron have the same chemical composition as well. One mystery might have been solved, but another popped right back in its place.

Read the story of the beads that ended up 450 miles from their source at Atlas Obscura.

(Image credit: Rdikeman)


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Saving The Day Is Harder Than It Looks

Heroes are much more interesting when they have a few of the flaws we normal people deal with -or just bad luck. That's why Superman will never be as interesting as Batman. And why Deadpool captured the moviegoing audience's attention so well -he's far from perfect, and we can relate. When filmmakers throw a bolt into the machinery of a daring caper, it provides us with an unexpected gasp or laugh or something to keep us from falling asleep during the heroic actions we expect.   

(YouTube link)

Robert Jones found those moments in 43 different movies, most of which you've seen. Enjoy this movie supercut. -Thanks, Robert!


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Rare Photos Surface from a Star Wars: Return of the Jedi Photo Shoot

This image is from a photoshoot by Brian Griffin, taken back in 1982 for the movie Star Wars: Return of the Jedi. They weren't used at the time, and have only been seen sporadically in the years since. You can see a gallery of the nine images featuring Luke, Leia, Han, Darth, and Chewbacca at TVOM.

(Image credit: Brian Griffin Photography)


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18 Facts You May Not Known About Don Rickles

Neatorama presents a guest post from actor, comedian, and voiceover artist Eddie Deezen. Visit Eddie at his website or at Facebook.

 The recent passing of Don Rickles on April 6th left many of us sad, wistful and perhaps even a little worried. Known around the world as "the merchant of venom" and "Mr. Warmth" (a nickname bestowed on him by Johnny Carson), Don was, apparently, the last of the insult comics.

Don insulted everyone, he was an equal opportunity insulter. He insulted presidents, royalty, the biggest celebrities in the world, as well as commoners, nonentities, hicks, yokels, and rubes. But no one ever objected or took any offense. Heck, it was a badge of honor to have Don Rickles insult you.

And with the age of political correctness closing its humorless noose around our collective necks, somehow we sensed that the end of an era had arrived. And Don Rickles, one of the funniest guys in the world, was the last of a dying breed. Okay, here are 18 facts you may not have known about the great Don Rickles.

1. He served in World War II.

After graduating from Newtown High School in New York, Don Rickles served on the motor torpedo boat tender USS Cyrene, he was a seaman first class. He was honorably discharged in 1946.

2. He graduated from the prestigious American Academy of Dramatic Arts.

Among his classmates were Jason Robards, Anne Bancroft, and Grace Kelly.

3. He became an insult comic almost by accident.

After graduating from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, Don wasn't getting any acting gigs, so he switched over to stand-up comedy. But he found that his stand-up act wasn't getting many laughs from the customers. So he started insulting them. He quickly discovered that the paying crowds liked (and laughed more) at his insult shtick than his stand-up routine, so he stuck with it.

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Profile for Miss Cellania

  • Member Since 2012/08/04


Statistics

Blog Posts

  • Posts Written 25,883
  • Comments Received 94,498
  • Post Views 40,030,273
  • Unique Visitors 32,283,171
  • Likes Received 36,256

Comments

  • Threads Started 3,984
  • Replies Posted 2,619
  • Likes Received 1,765
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