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9 Lines in the Sand

The following is an article from the book Uncle John's Bathroom Reader History's Lists.

Borders, fences, fortifications, demarcations- whatever you call them, there are a lot of dividing lines in history. Here are some of the most famous.

1. HADRIAN’S WALL


Milecastle 39 on Hadrian’s Wall near Steel Rigg. (Image credit: Adam Cuerden)

In AD 122, the Roman Empire was near the height of its power, but in the far-flung imperial province of Britannia, the empire was having some trouble near its northern border. To control that line in the heath, Emperor Hadrian ordered the construction of what became the most heavily-fortified border in the Western world at the time: a 73-mile wall of limestone and turf, with small forts roughly every Roman mile occupied by a few dozen troops. Additionally, larger forts were also constructed. The Romans built the wall well enough that it survived the Roman Empire, and what remains of it became a World Heritage Site in 1987.

2. THE TORDESILLAS MERIDIAN



(Image credit: Lencer)

There’s a reason that the citizens of Brazil speak Portuguese while nearly all of the rest of South America speaks Spanish: that reason is the Tordesillas Meridian. In 1493, Pope Alexander VI offered a papal edict saying that Spain (Alexander VI’s native country) would control any land west of a meridian (a line stretching from pole to pole) that lay 100 leagues west of the Cape Verde islands, which were off the coast of Africa. This meant that the pope was giving the Americas to Spain, which did not sit well with the Portuguese, who thought they were entitled to it.

In 1494, the Spanish and Portuguese signed the Treaty of Tordesillas, which nudges that papal line further west -giving Portugal the eastern “bump” of the South American continent that would become Brazil.

3. THE PALE

(Image credit: Hamish Bain)

When is a line not just a line? When it is “the Pale” -an area on the eastern shore of Ireland that was directly under the control of the English crown during the Middle Ages. It derived its name from the Latin word palus, which literally meant a stake, but figuratively meant a fence or line, the lands beyond which one does not have control (and indeed, the Pale had a border fence, or some say a line of dikes). This is what people are referring to when they use the expression “beyond the pale.”

4.  MASON-DIXON LINE

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Dog Puppet Pranks Real Dogs

(YouTube link)

Just For Laughs planted a dog puppet in a park. Real dogs may have never noticed it, if it didn’t have a nice, meaty bone! But the bone attracts the dogs, and the puppet defends his treasure. These poor confused dogs don’t know what’s real and what’s not anymore! -via Viral Viral Videos

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

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A Beginner’s Guide to the Star Trek Franchise

For those who wish to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations in pop culture and science fiction, the Star Trek universe can be intimidating. Yes, there are plenty of people who haven’t watched Star Trek for one reason or another, but might if they knew where to start.

Star Trek is more than pop culture; it’s 20th century mythology with its own complicated mythos. “Beam me up” and “live long and prosper” may have invaded the cultural lexicon, but Star Trek is particularly intimidating for the uninitiated. Where to start and what to skip are up for debate even among the most hardcore Trekkies and Trekkers (the fandom can’t even decide on a name for itself). One thing is clear: It all begins with Gene Roddenberry, the visionary who created the original show in the 1960s and presided over the franchise until his death in 1991. The WWII fighter pilot turned TV writer would have turned 93 this August. He’s survived by a franchise that encompasses five live action TV shows, one animated series, and 12 films. Given that Star Trek will celebrate its 50th anniversary in just two short years, this the perfect time for new fans to jump on Roddenberry’s “Wagon Train to the stars.”

The A.V. Club has stepped up to the plate with a guide for Star Trek newbies, which includes a brief history and description of each series and recommends standout episodes to introduce the viewer. There are also recaps of the movies and miscellaneous information to make tackling Star Trek both easy and fun for a beginner. Baby steps. For the established Star Trek fan, it’s a walk down memory lane (or more likely, Memory Alpha), with plenty to argue about, which you’d expect.


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55-foot Human Water Catapult

(YouTube link)

Oh, this will be exciting -the strange phenomena known as the water blob gets the Devin Supertramp POV treatment! But that’s not all that’s going on: there’s also wakeboarding, waterskiing, jet skiing, surfing, and that odd water jetpack thing. Makes you wish that summer vacation could last forever, doesn’t it? That, and I wish I was thirty years younger and had the wherewithal to travel to such fun places. If you’d like more, there’s a behind-the-scenes video, too. -via Viral Viral Videos


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18 "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" Facts About Mary Poppins

The 1964 Disney movie Mary Poppins was released 50 years ago this week. What better way to celebrate its anniversary than by learning some movie trivia? For example: 

10. That’s Julie Andrews whistling the robin’s part during “A Spoonful of Sugar.”

An accomplished whistler (who knew?), Andrews recorded the robin's sweet tune. In order for the bird to move and nod during the scene, by the way, Andrews had to wear a ring that connected to it. Yards of cable ran from the ring, up her arm, and out to engineers who could control the bird’s movements.

11. Disney was sued over “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious.”

Though the Sherman Brothers claimed they made the word up themselves, a 1949 song called “Supercalafajaistickespeealadojus” would seem to say otherwise. The writers of the song, Barney Young and Gloria Parker, sued for $12 million. They lost because lawyers were able to present evidence showing that the nonsense word had been around, in some form or another, for decades. Indeed, the Sherman Brothers later claimed that their made-up word was a variation on a similar word they had heard at summer camp back in the 1930s: “super-cadja-flawjalistic-espealedojus.”

There are videos from the film and about the film accompanying the 18 facts about Mary Poppins at mental_floss.


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A Monument to Old Douglas

Earlier this week, John told us about the Camels of Texas. The Confederate Army used quite a few of them during the Civil War. That inspired Neatorama reader Russ Warner to send us some of his neat pictures of the Cedar Hill Cemetery in Vicksburg, Mississippi, where the camel named Old Douglas, of Company A of the Forty-third Mississippi Infantry, is honored with a marker. From Wikipedia:

Though the men tried to treat Old Douglas like a horse, the camel was known to break free of any tether, and was eventually allowed to graze freely. Despite not being tied up, he never wandered far from the men. The Infantry’s horses feared Old Douglas, and he is recorded to have spooked one horse into starting a stampede, which reportedly injured many, and possibly killed one or two horses.[5]

Old Douglas’s first active service was with Gen. Price in the Iuka campaign. He also participated in the 1862 Battle of Corinth.[3] He remained with the regiment until the Siege of Vicksburg, where he was killed by Union sharpshooters.[6] Enraged at his murder, the men swore to avenge him. Col. Bevier enlisted six of his best snipers, and successfully shot the culprit. Of Douglas’s murderer, Bevier reportedly said, “I refused to hear his name, and was rejoiced to learn that he had been severely wounded.[7]” According to legend, after Douglas was shot, his remains were carved up and eaten, with some of his bones made into souvenirs by Federal soldiers.[2]

Learn more about the American camels from the Texas Camel Corps, a group “established to educate the public about the historic use of camels in America in the 19th century.”



(Images credit: Russ Warner, Brandon, Mississippi)


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80 Years of Marriage

Look at this lovely couple getting married in London in 1934. Such a gorgeous dress! And the groom’s stylish mustache belies the fact that he was only 22 years old. That was 80 years ago, and they haven’t changed all much. Yes, Maurice and Helen Kaye are still alive and still married. He is 102 and just recently gave up driving. She just turned 101 and looks decades younger.

If what they have could be bottled, they would make a fortune. Apart from the odd ache and pain, they are in good health, presiding over a family that loves them. They talk about their son, their daughter (and each of their spouses), their children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren with the pride of people who know how lucky they are. Although luck hasn’t always been with them.

Together they survived World War II, in which their house was destroyed by bombs, bore four children, of which two now survive, and built a chain of clothing stores. You can read their story at The Guardian.  -via Buzzfeed


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Ant Teamwork

(YouTube link)

A colony of ants work together to drag dinner back to the nest to share -and possibly store- their find. The ants form chain to get more pulling power. At first I thought this was a sausage (you know how ants are at picnics), but considering the scale, I think it’s a worm or a millipede. The language is not identified, so maybe you could help us out if you recognize it. -via reddit


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Peter the Elephant Plays the Red Clarinet

(YouTube link)

Peter the elephant lives in Ayutthaya, Thailand. Here, he enjoys a clarinet tune from Paul Barton and wants to make some music of his own. Elephant see, elephant do. Who’s going to tell him he can’t? -via Tastefully Offensive 

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

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Cat and Toddler Chase Red Dot

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Need any more proof that the laser pointer is the best toy ever? We’ve seen all kinds of animals chase after the red dot, but in this case, a cat and a child compete to see who catches it first. Instant entertainment for Mom and Dad! -via Tastefully Offensive

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

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Thumbs Up!

Redditor meancloth is pretty sure everything is fine with the latest ultrasound image. Baby A gives a thumbs up to assure him that conditions are AOK inside. Baby A? Yep, the other baby is fine, too. However, if you’re into counting fingers and toes, Baby A seems to have six on one hand. That could be a sonogram artifact, or a biological bonus. As if twins aren’t already a biological bonus!  

See more about baby and kids at NeatoBambino

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Batman Spotted in Chiba Prefecture, Japan

(YouTube link)

The Caped Crusader, or an awesome facsimile, was spotted this week breezing down the highway on a three-wheeled Batcycle in Chiba Prefecture in Japan this week. The cosplayer, nicknamed “Chibatman,” was photographed by quite a few people who all had to post images on social media.

He appears to wear a very faithful version of the costume from The Dark Knight. See more pictures of Chibatman at The Daily Dot.


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Antler Farms

We told you about the rise of deer as livestock, that are now bred on farms for venison. That’s somewhat equivalent to raising cattle for beef, but it’s not the most lucrative use of specifically-bred deer. Another kind of deer farm breeds deer for their antlers: the bigger, the better.

Hunters give antlers a score by measuring features like the length and spread of the main beams and the number and length of the smaller tines that grow out of them. Out in the wild, a really big buck might score 200 inches, if he’s got a “typical” rack, with the main beams curving out from his forehead and an orderly line of tines pointing towards the sky. On a “non-typical” rack, the main beam might split and split again, and the irregular tines will wind chaotically outward. The largest of these, on wild deer, come in over 300 inches.

The antlers that are being produced on deer farms grow much, much larger. In the past five years, farmers have produced non-typical antlers with scores of more than 500 — even more than 600 — inches. It’s not unusual to find deer with 400-inch racks, while racks in the 200-inch range, which on a wild deer would be amazing, are becoming standard for deer raised on farms. Much as the poultry industry has super-sized chicken breasts to meet humans’ culinary preferences, the deer industry has succeeded in enlarging antlers to meet their aesthetic ones.

So what good are big antlers? Hunters are willing to pay a premium for the opportunity to hunt a deer with a spectacular rack they can show off as a trophy. Hunting preserves buy big-antlered deer to attract big-money hunters. And the practice will continue as long as people are impressed with antlers hanging on someone’s wall. However, the most avid opponents of breeding deer for antlers are other hunters. Read more about antler farms at Modern Farmer. -via Digg   

(Image credit: Miko Maciaszek)


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Paper Dresses and Psychedelic Catsuits: When Airline Fashion Was Flying High

Flight attendants have always been service and safety professionals, but at one time they were blatantly used as sex symbols to lure customers. Stewardesses of the 1960s and ‘70s were fashion plates, and designers had a great time making them look different and striking. Collectors Weekly talked to former steward and uniform collector Cliff Muskiet and transportation memorabilia collector Todd Lappin about airline fashions of that era.

Because no one tried to hide the fact that flight attendants were there to be eye candy, big-named designers had a fun time dressing them up and coming up with sexy new gimmicks to promote air travel. In 1968, Jean Louis gave United Airlines stewardesses a simple, mod A-line dress with a wide stripe down the front and around the collar, and paired it with a big, blocky kefi-type cap. During the ’60s and ’70s, Pucci designed five different uniforms for Braniff International Airways.

“If you look at the Pucci uniforms, you can’t imagine that women wore these items,” Muskiet says. “There was even a space helmet, like a plastic bubble. It was used when it was raining outside, so the hat and hair wouldn’t get wet. Braniff also had something called the ‘Air Strip’ in 1965. During service, the stewardesses would take something off to reveal a different layer and a different look underneath. They might be wearing a skirt and remove it to show off their hot pants beneath.”

Airlines still try to have fashionable uniforms, but they are less sexist and more professional and functional these days. Read about how that happened, along with the history of flight attendant uniforms, at Collectors Weekly.   


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Marvin Gaye’s What’s Going On

Only one man could make an album about poverty, drugs, and the Vietnam War sound sexy and soulful. That man was Marvin Gaye, and his vision changed the music industry forever. On the 28th anniversary of his tragic death, let's look back at What's Going On.

In November 1970, Marvin Gaye brought Motown Records president Berry Gordy a new song he’d just recorded called “What’s Going On.” Gordy was thrilled. It had been more than a year since Gaye had released his last big hit, “That’s the Way Love Is,” and the singer had been going through a rough patch. During the 1960s, Gaye had achieved great success as a suave song-and-dance man. But in 1967, his singing partner, Tammi Terrell, was diagnosed with a brain tumor after collapsing into his arms on stage. After several unsuccessful surgeries, she died on March 16, 1970, and Gaye was inconsolable. On top of that, he was in trouble with the IRS, his marriage was falling apart, and his only brother was fighting in Vietnam.

Tired of churning out peppy love songs, Gaye co-wrote “What’s Going On” with the hope of taking his music in a new direction. He wanted, in his words, to “touch the souls of people everywhere.” When his boss, Berry Gordy, listened to the new recording, his excitement turned to horror. The song was more than a soulful change of pace; it was a lament depicting the sorrow and futility of the Vietnam War. Over a bed of heavy percussion, street-corner jive, and mellow strings, Gaye sang, “Mother, mother, there’s too many of you crying / Brother, brother, brother, there’s far too many of you dying.” The sound and lyrics clashed with Motown’s upbeat attitude, and a startled Gordy knocked it as “the worst record [he’d] ever heard.”

Gaye didn’t flinch. He believed in his music, and he gave Gordy an ultimatum: Release the single, or he’d walk from Motown. After a four-month stalemate, Gordy agreed to put out the song, even though he was sure it would flop.

It didn’t.

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An Honest Trailer for Ghostbusters

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Screen Junkies gets around to giving us an honest trailer for Ghostbusters 30 years later. This episode is a bit of a departure for the series, as they can’t really find all that much to make fun of in the 1984 comedy. Ghostbusters is almost beyond criticism. The worst they can say about it is that it is a little adult for a kid’s movie. Hmm. I saw Ghostbusters as an adult in 1984, and I don’t recall it being marketed as a kid’s movie. It wasn’t, but the internet generation just happens to of an age to recall it from their childhoods. Today, a PG rating might designate a movie aimed at kids, but thirty years ago, it meant parental guidance suggested, which was the proper rating. -via Geeks Are Sexy


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How to Kill a Dementor

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The Brotherhood Workshop brings us a Harry Potter LEGO short, with an awesome way to destroy a dementor.

Dementors feed on the happiness of others. So what happens when they find a creature with limitless happiness?

Who could that be? Watch and find out! -via Laughing Squid


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Titanic: The Movie That Made History

Neatorama presents a guest post from actor, comedian, and voiceover artist Eddie Deezen. Visit Eddie at his website or at Facebook.

Director James Cameron was originally inspired to make Titanic while making The Abyss, a science-fiction underwater film. He also reportedly had a fascination with shipwrecks. Cameron himself went under to explore the remains of the actual Titanic twelve times, at an average of 16 hours each spent there each time. A special camera, designed by his brother, was built to withstand the underwater pressure.

Titanic, Cameron's 1997 film, was the first movie to make over $1 billion dollars worldwide. Its $600 million dollar U.S. box office was the all-time record until Cameron's own 2009 film Avatar overtook it. Titanic still holds the never-to-be-equaled record of being the #1 weekly box office champ an incredible 15 weeks in a row from 1997 to '98.

It made a silver screen icon of star Leonardo DiCaprio, although, strangely, despite the film's 14 Oscar nominations, he was snubbed by the Academy.

Leading lady Kate Winslet, playing “Rose,” got her Oscar nod for Best Supporting Actress, along with Gloria Stuart (who played “Old Rose" in the film, and hadn't appeared in a movie in over 30 years). This proved the only instance on Oscar history of two people both being nominated for playing the same character in the same movie (both were nominated for Best Supporting Actress -neither won- although Titanic did garner 11 awards).

The studio executives' first choice to play the male lead was Matthew McConaughey, but both Cameron and Winslet wanted Leo DiCaprio. Originally, Cameron wasn't that familiar with him, but at their first meeting, Cameron noticed that "all the women in the building" showed up to catch a glimpse of young Leo. Although there was no “Jack Dawson" (DiCaprio's character), Cameron was to discover that there was a “J. Dawson" on board the real-life Titanic. He was an engineer who drowned in the disaster.

Cameron's original choice for Rose was Gwyneth Paltrow, but Kate lobbied hard to snag the role. The Rose character was named in honor of Cameron's grandmother.

Early on in the film, Kate "flashed" Leo. This was to get him used to seeing her in her birthday suit, because they would be spending much time together filming the famous nude scene. On the day of the nude scene's filming, Kate was getting made up, when Leo walked in accidentally and said “Whoa!" Again, to get him used to seeing her nude, she told him to stay. (Incidentally, Cameron himself drew the "nude portrait" of Rose featured in the scene, as well as all of Jack's drawings.)



Leo claimed to be "water sensitive" and would seldom appear in any water scenes where the water was "too cold.” The water in the hallway scenes was 50 degrees, but the water in the "out in the ocean" scenes was warmed to 80 degrees.

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Arby’s $10 Meat Mountain

Arby’s made a poster to show all the different kinds of meats they use on their various sandwiches. The idea was to counter the perception that they only serve roast beef. The poster, shown here, inspired customers to ask if they could have “that” sandwich.

The answer is now yes; yes, you can have a $10 pile of meat between two buns, but you’ll have to know to ask for it as it won’t be on the menu.

That mound includes: 2 chicken tenders; 1.5 oz. of roast turkey; 1.5 oz. of ham; 1 slice of Swiss cheese; 1.5 oz. of corned beef; 1.5 oz. brisket; 1.5 oz. of Angus steak; 1 slice of cheddar cheese; 1.5 oz. roast beef and 3 half-strips of bacon.

That’s a lot of meat on one sandwich. You might want to ask for a fork, too. -via Metafilter

We dish up more neat food posts at the Neatolicious blog

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What Lies Beneath Stonehenge?

In the September issue of Smithsonian magazine, we see how archaeologists can explore underground without digging it up. Vince Gaffney heads a project that has given us a sort of three-dimensional map of what’s underneath the land surrounding the most mysterious place in Britain: Stonehenge.

Gaffney’s latest research effort, the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project, is a four-year collaboration between a British team and the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology in Austria that has produced the first detailed underground survey of the area surrounding Stonehenge, totaling more than four square miles. The results are astonishing. The researchers have found buried evidence of more than 15 previously unknown or poorly understood late Neolithic monuments: henges, barrows, segmented ditches, pits. To Gaffney, these findings suggest a scale of activity around Stonehenge far beyond what was previously suspected.

Read about what they found, and see plenty of pictures and graphics to explain the project at Smithsonian. -via reddit

(Image credit: Henrik Knudsen)


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How To Harvest Cherries

(YouTube link)

Picking cherries by hand is way too labor-intensive for commercial orchardists. The get the most cherries in the least time, you need specialized equipment, but strangely the one piece of heavy equipment not involved is a cherry picker! Instead, you’ll need a specialized roll of tarp to catch the cherries, a conveyor belt to gather them, and the world’s largest vibrator, the Vibro6 EH. Now that’s one huge vibrator! Shake the tree, gather the cherries, and move on. Cool! -via Viral Viral Videos


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Back to School: The 70s vs. Today

I loved back-to-school time when I was a kid. I got new penny loafers, a plaid skirt, and knee socks. We never started school before September. But I didn’t look forward to the beans and cornbread the cafeteria served at least twice a week. Things have changed quite a bit since then. A post at Wide Lawns and Narrow Minds contrasts the process of sending kids to school when the author was a kid with the process today. For example, packing lunches.

5. Spread yellow mustard on bread. Slap baloney on bread. Unwrap American cheese slices and put on top of baloney. Put top on the sandwich and wrap sandwich in tin foil or wax paper. Put it in the lunchbox. Every kid gets the same exact lunch. Period.

6. Alternate sandwich choices could include: peanut butter and grape jelly, peanut butter and marshmallow fluff, the end of last night's leftover roast beef or the ever popular with children tuna fish with large chunks of onions and celery and Miracle Whip.

7. Put some Planter's Cheese Balls into a baggie and close with a twist tie.

8. Take Twinkies out of the box. Put one in each child's lunch box.

9. Fill Thermoses with either Kool-Aid or whole milk.

10. Include a red delicious apple even though you know that damned apple is just going to come home uneaten again, which is fine because you can keep adding the same one until it practically rots.

That was the ‘70s version. The new millennial lunches much more involved, but will give you a laugh as you fill out all that paperwork and buy all those supplies for school this year. -via Boing Boing

See more about baby and kids at NeatoBambino

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Legroom Spat Leads to Plane Diversion

A fight over legroom territory led to a unscheduled landing for a United Airlines flight. The Knee Defender is a set of clamps you can take on an airplane to disable the reclining ability of the seat in front of you. Many airlines prohibit them, including United. On Sunday, the use of the device led to an unscheduled landing. The flight from Newark to Denver diverted to Chicago, where the two passengers were put off the flight.

The fight started when the male passenger, seated in a middle seat of row 12, used the Knee Defender to stop the woman in front of him from reclining while he was on his laptop, according to a law enforcement official with knowledge of the situation who spoke on condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to speak.

A flight attendant asked him to remove the device and he refused. The woman then stood up, turned around and threw a cup of water at him, the official says. That's when United decided to land in Chicago. The two passengers were not allowed to continue to Denver.

Both passengers were sitting in United's Economy Plus section, the part of the plane that has four more inches of legroom than the rest of coach.

TSA officials and Chicago police talked to the fighting passengers and declined to arrest either one. The flight continued to Denver, where it arrived an hour and 38 minutes late, minus two passengers. -via Digg

(Unrelated image credit: Lasse Fuss)


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Cockatoo Does the Dogs a Favor

(YouTube link)

“Hey, boys! Wanna Milk-Bone? I gotcha Milk-Bones right here! Have one! Have another! Just remember what your old friend Spike did for you some day when I need a hand. Ya never know when I might need a big dog to defend me!”

These Great Danes have a friend in a high place- Spike, the Umbrella Cockatoo, who is glad to hand out the treats they thought they’d have to earn. -via Arbroath

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

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The Penalty for Public Urination

No public urination! The rule is clear, but this addition to the standard sign in the Czech Republic spells out the consequences clearly. A fine can be paid and forgotten, but YouTube is forever.

And this is the same country that has a public fountain featuring a pissing contest between two statues.

View more fun pics over at our NeatoPicto Blog

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New Orleans Nine Years After Katrina

Ted Jackson of the Times-Picayune selected photographs from the archives taken during and after hurricane Katrina in 2005, some of which he took himself. He found the same locations and re-shot them nine years after the hurricane that devastated the city. Jackson also tells us the stories behind the locations. The top picture here was taken in September of 2005 by John McCusker.

This was a perfect choice to reshoot since the two houses in the photo have been rebuilt. The location was iconic. The water lines are clearly visible on the exterior walls. When I located the corner, I was surprised to find new landscaping blocking the view. After carefully studying the angles and rooflines as they compared with each other, it became clear that the spot McCusker stood was now crowded by a large bush and a stop sign. I also needed about six feet of elevation to match the debris pile the security worker was walking on. A ladder and a tripod solved both of these issues.

Jackson mentions in the comments that there were many great photos taken during the disaster that couldn’t be recreated because none of the landmarks in them have survived. You can compare a dozen pairs of pictures with a slide application at the Times-Picayune site. THe very last photo is particularly devastating. -via Metafilter


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Going Off to College

This will be me next year, although I doubt I will get my daughter to leave behind the panda bear she’s had since she was a baby. It no longer has ears, a mouth, clothing, or much in the way of arms, but it is still special. This comic is from Carolyn at A Zillion Dollar Comics. -via Pleated-Jeans


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Bananas: An A-Peel-ing History

The following article is republished from Uncle John's Ahh-Inspiring Bathroom Reader.

(Image credit: Steve Hopson)

According to one legend, the fruit that Eve found irresistible in the Garden of Eden was not an apple, but a banana. Is it true? Who knows? But for thousands of years, the banana has been a source of pleasure …and sometimes trouble.

HOW THEY SPREAD

* Bananas are believed to have originated in the rain forests of Southeast Asia, where a variety of species still grow.

* Arab traders brought the banana to the Middle East and Africa in the seventh century. But these weren’t the large fruit we know today -they were just a few inches in length. In fact, some historians believe “banana” comes from banan, the Arabic words meaning “finger.”

* By the late 1400s, bananas were a staple food along the western coast of Africa where Portuguese sailors collected plants and brought them to the Canary Islands, between Africa and Spain.

* In 1516 Tomás de Berlanga, a Spanish priest, brought banana stalks to the New World, to the island of Hispañiola (now Haiti and the Dominican Republic). And he took plants with him to the mainland when he was made bishop of Panama in 1534.

* Another priest, Vasco de Quiroga, brought banana plants from Hispañiola to Mexico in the mid-16th century. From there, bananas spread and flourished through the Caribbean basin, leading many to believe -erroneously- that they were native to the region.

COMING TO AMERICA

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Extreme Boat Parking

(YouTube link)

Look at that boat coming in… that’s a really big boat. Do you think he’s going to try to dock here? Right between these two boats? I don’t think there’s enough room. That boat’s bigger than we thought! How is he going to get between these two? Oh… that’s how.

This is actually a ship wrecking yard in Turkey, so all’s well that ends well in this case. -via Geeks Are Sexy


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Babies Discovering Mirrors

(YouTube link)

In this compilation of babies seeing themselves in mirrors for the first time, we see that they catch on fairly quickly that it’s a reflection of themselves. After all, most of them recognize their mothers in the mirror. This new discovery soon gives way to the common and particularly human joy of admiring ourselves. -via Tastefully Offensive

See more about baby and kids at NeatoBambino

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Profile for Miss Cellania

  • Member Since 2012/08/04


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