Katiekatiekatie's Comments

Calling Jason Everman a member of Nirvana is akin to calling Jimmy Nicol a member of the Beatles. Yes, he played with the group while they toured for a year, but he was never intended to be a fulltime member (although he certainly was exploited to cover the studio fees for their first album, which he didn't even play on).

Interestingly--depending on how much you care about the bands!--Jason's role was reprised in the 1993-1994 tour by Pat Smear, who joined Dave Grohl (who himself replaced Nirvana's Everman-era drummer Chad Channing) in founding the Foo Fighters. He continues to play with that band today, a 5-year hiatus not withstanding.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
  2 replies
Not odd at all; the public school I recently worked at enforced an employee dresscode for men of a dress shirt and khakis/slacks (upperclass staff were encouraged [peer-pressured from peers rather than administration!] to add a tie to the ensemble). Women staff likewise had code on a similar level of formality.

I'm of two minds on it. Dressing seriously is one subtle cue to your students that you take their education seriously. On the other hand, one of my most brilliant teachers was a long-haired scientist fellow with a uniform of old sneakers, ripped jeans, and flannel shirts.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
Thanks for your post; 2 years ago I was reading Curious George to a group of kindergarten students. At one point, George gets taken to jail. A little girl piped right up, "Oh, just like my daddy!" It was like a flootgate opened -- several other students joined in, "Yeah, my cousin too!" or, "My brother was in jail," and even a, "My mom gets home soon!"

It's great that it's not a reality for a lot of kids, but why cast aspersions on the affected children? They didn't get arrested. They just love someone who did. Kudos to Sesame Street for creating materials just for them. A pity the Alex muppet will only 'live' online and not on the Street proper; seems like a lot of adults could learn something from him too.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
I definitely think you can call a 9-year-old a psychopath. I've worked with one from the time he was 5 up to 11. It's extremely unnerving, and I hope he gets help that works before adulthood or I know I'll see his name in the news eventually.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
How about this: people are often forced to use credit in emergencies because the rate of inflation on cost of living in America has not matched wage inflation in the past 40 years. Sure, many people are irresponsible with credit cards -- but, earmarking savings is also simply impossible for a significant portion of lower and middle class Americans who have very realistic outlooks on standard of living and try to spend within their means.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
Except that in this particular moment of silence, there's a good chance that a fair few of those people stopping lost a relative -- grandparent, parent, sibling, aunt -- in the holocaust. I see the pause as more of a moment of remembrance, not a preventative measure or time to focus on past trauma.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
He may be able to afford to pay for them (no thanks in part to the reality TV fees that America keeps shoveling over thattaway) but at least half his children are being reared by cameras rather than parents. There comes a capping point on the extent of familial familiarity and they reached it long ago. These aren't kids borne of love, they're borne of weird fundamentalism and the lack of personal restraint.

I feel bad for the kids, all of them for unique reasons. I can't imagine such a life nor being OK with granting it to my own offspring.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
Agreed on the danish not being a bread; it'd be considered a pastry by most of us I think and therefore not on this chart at all.

Most commonwealth country folks I know will say that scones are the same as biscuits, but most Americans will say they're a different beast (particularly those from the south). Technically I do think there are types of scones that are similar to an American biscuit, but scones often include eggs or cream in the recipe and almost always use butter rather than lard as a traditional American biscuit would. Plus scones also often have nuts or dried fruit included.

I'd call the pictured American English 'biscuit' a scone although it does seem to be one of the more biscuity scones, apart from the fruit.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
A great documentary about them, 'Herb and Dorothy,' has been available on Netflix (US) instant queue for a while now. They are a really cute couple and I enjoyed it, even though I'm not a particular fan of minimalist art.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
@Miss Cellania, many Facebook users make use of content-limiting privacy lists. Unless you're white-listed for some peoples' specific posts/photos, you will not be able to view them. The employers are requesting the passwords to go in and look at the 'real' content of the Facebook that might otherwise be hidden to the general public.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
There has been an unusual amount of reposted content recently. John Farrier shared this on the 4th. Is there no link duplication check in the neatorama back end? Do updaters read the site as well?
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
This is stupid as 'science' but interesting as 'art'. I would be a bit unsettled, were I one of the artist's gastroenterologist/nutritionist helpers, to have her label it a "clinical study" and include my name in any context.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
John, they have turned away from Latin in the plant's description but not in their names. Your headline reads "Botanists turn away from Latin plant names" -- which is not true in any sense. That is why the headline is misleading.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
Was one of the rare fat kids growing up in an era when it was ok to make fun of the fatties per Dennis X, and already felt shitty enough about that as it was. Better to emphasize reasonable portion-sizes and meal components. Most of these kids already think of themselves as too worthless or so fat that it's not worth bothering about. Honestly, the ads aren't that bad -- the kids hear and think far worse about themselves as it is. But does it foster change in them? No, probably not. And shouldn't that be the goal?
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
I appreciated the link; I'd heard before that there were no surviving recordings of first-generation "rebel yells." I'm about as far left as you can go and think a lot of present-day southerners are deluded by historical revisions regarding the Civil War, but the history belongs to us all.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
I work at a charter school with a mixed-race student body (although given our location it's 75% Hispanic with Spanish as a first language, and 85% of families fall below the poverty line).

Honestly, I find this inspiring. The flatly-stated expectation that students from the school DO go on to college mirrors my own experience in a private, tuitioned college prep school--and yes, I do think that in itself encourages a certain student culture. Similarly, I like the intra-school competitions between each "pride". In going over their website, I think the Harry Potter comparisons have more to do with ignorant media and publicity, but nonetheless, you tell a student that they are part of an elite for being selected (even by random lottery!) for a school and then challenge them to meet that bar ... inevitably, if it's a part of the peer culture, the students will meet you there.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
cont. from prior comment (and please do pretend this is bold allcaps):

(ii) When reasonably necessary to avoid conditions (including but not limited to, fixed or moving objects, motor vehicles, bicycles, pedestrians, pushcarts, animals, surface hazards) that make it unsafe to continue within such bicycle path or lane.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
@mikecc - the man in the video never broke the law. Here is the relevant portion of NYC code:

34 RCNY ยง 4-12(p) Bicycles.
(1) Bicycle riders to use bicycle lanes. Whenever a usable path or lane for bicycles has been provided, bicycle riders shall use such path or lane only except under any of the following situations:
(i) When preparing for a turn at an intersection or into a private road or driveway.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
The boy's actions fit Illinois' legal definitions of cyberstalking (class 4 felony, 1-3 years/fines up to $25,000) and depending on the language it could qualify as any number of things.

But no, surely it's just big bad government infringing on his first amendment rights to harass people. Kids will be kids but not all kids are little sociopaths.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
Not a bad ad, but it should definitely be preceded by the Mustafa ad. Not all the spin-offs, but the original at least. And frankly, that should've been their campaign in the US before running a good thing into the ground anyway.

Old Spice cologne is fantastic; I feel like they've done harm to their brand by pumping out ads that equate Old Spice with Axe.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)
ted, say what you want about her morals or relative responsibility, but Paris Hilton turned her well-to-do upbringing into a multi-million entertainment entrepreneurial venture in its own right. Clothes, perfume, music, acting ... she's raking it in. Of course the true test is whether or not any of that will be left in 20 years, but Paris Hilton isn't stupid. She knows full well what will sell and panders to her target demographic.
Abusive comment hidden. (Show it anyway.)


Page 1 of 2       next

Profile for Katiekatiekatie

  • Member Since 2012/08/04


Statistics

Comments

  • Threads Started 39
  • Replies Posted 2
  • Likes Received 3