Dolly 2's Comments

I lived in the late 50s in an apartment on Hemenway Street in Boston that had this exact unit. It was a tiny apartment, and my roommate and I appreciated the fact that we had a "real" kitchen in spite of the lack of space. I'd forgotten about it until I saw the ad, which brought it all back. Fun times!
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My cat Harry (now deceased) walked happily on a leash for the entire 16 years I had him. Got him from an animal shelter, and since I lived near a busy street but wanted him to be able to enjoy the outdoors, I thought I would give it a try shortly after we brought him home from the pound. He just stood there and let me put the harness on him, and thereafter basically behaved like a dog in a cat suit. He liked it if I staked him out so he could watch the birds. I think he must have been trained from kittenhood.
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My dad was in the business of selling coal and grain in the 40s, so all the dresses my sisters and I wore, especially during the war, were made from grain (and flour) sacks. I have some old photos of us wearing our sack dresses that my mother, a talented seamstress, made for us.
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I volunteer for our local Friends of the Library that receives donations of thousands of used and new books. We are careful to check the books for whatever might be tucked inside (I found $250 in a biography of Harry Truman a few years ago), and we have collections of "things found in books" that get made into a display for our monthly book sales. Once I was working a book sale, and the person who was sitting with me discovered an old photo of her wedding up on the display -- that was a source of much merriment among the volunteers. The list of items could fill up many pages on single-spaced, 8pt type I'm sure (the Friends is a very old organization). We too have found bacon. Why would someone use a strip of bacon for a bookmark? The mind boggles!
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One of my favorite man-made objects in the world! Spent a glorious few days in Granada back in 1973 with husband and kids, and the day we were at the Alhambra (all day, I might add) remains one of the peak experiences of my life.

So glad it's still intact and perfect. A magnificent work of art.
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The 1981 novel Century's End by Russell Griffin predicted among other things the Walkman and Viagra. It's a lost masterpiece and he's an unappreciated genius!
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Just don't ever go in there during monsoon season -- flash floods come unannounced and numbers of folks have been swept away and drowned in the past. Beautiful place to die, though!
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It's handy to be able to write a dedication to the folks who come to your book signings -- when people look at my copies of my daughter's books and read her lovely messages to me, they always comment on her beautiful handwriting. It sets you apart as an individual, it's part of your personna! It's something to be cultivated to emphasize your uniqueness, an integral accessory, if you will, to a person's personality. Handwriting analysis, after all, is a valuable tool -- for criminologists, psychologists, etc. -- it's considered a science.
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Well, I practiced a combination of unconditional love with letting the kids know that we might disapprove of certain behavior but loved them anyway -- and also totally taught them to take responsibility for the consequences of their actions. My parents practiced "conditional love," and all their children resented the hell out of them. I made a promise to myself even before I had any kids that I would do things differently. It turned out extremely well -- as adults, all three offspring are awesome, productive, happy, well-adjusted, loving, successful. It works, people!
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Ringtails are the coolest critters ever -- one used to live in the rafters of a theater here in Tucson, and when the cork ceiling had to be taken down, it would run around up there totally exposed, swinging its tail so that the theater lights would illuminate it, freaking out the audience. It was eventually trapped and relocated. Also, in the Grand Canyon, they love to steal food from the campers who are on river trips -- my daughter, who was once a chef for a river running outfit, had a tug-of-war with a ringtail over a 5-lb bag of roast beef. Cheeky little thing! (She won.)
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My late husband, a musician, used to often whistle the tune that the birds on the wire represented as we drove by. He was one of those musicians who could look at a music staff and automatically know exactly what it would sound like. Fun idea! And if as we were passing by they moved and resettled, he would say, "ah, now it's a G minor chord" or whatever.
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When I was an archaeologist in Northern Arizona, working on the Navajo Reservation, we often saw flocks of sheep tended only by a dog or two -- no people in sight anywhere. They did a fine job. When I was a kid in rural New Hampshire, we would accompany the Border Collies that belonged to the neighboring farm to get the cows in at night -- we opened the gates -- other than that, they didn't need us. Monkeys are on a par with dogs as far as intelligence goes, so why not?
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The science education outreach organization I manage (The Physics Factory, Tucson, AZ) makes "regular" liquid nitrogen ice cream to entertain kids at various programs we present, but I love the idea of making alcoholic liquid nitrogen ice cream for adult gatherings. What a great idea!
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The floor of the Cup Cafe at the Hotel Congress in Tucson, Arizona, also is made of pennies. They are sealed with something, so no wear at all is evident -- and this place receives very high traffic. It looks cool.
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Specialists in the rock art of the Southwest pretty much agree that the petroglyphs (which do take a long time to make, especially the more complex ones) represent either shamanic icons or actual art. The impulse for mankind to make art is basic, and certain symbols occur over a number of different cultures, often widely separated in terms of space and time. Think spirals, for instance, which are ubiquitous. Or mazes. Or handprints -- I could go on and on. These symbols are present in the human unconscious (read Jung theories of the collective unconscious) regardless of the culture. I have seen gigantic rock art sites (one in northern Arizona on the Hopi Reservation covers all the cliffsides of a 250 acre mesa) completely exposed to the open air, not hidden away at all. In fact the panel used to illustrate this article is called "Newspaper Rock," and it's totally out in the open in northern Arizona near Monument Valley. For a great look at some amazing rock art, check out "Stone Chisel and Yucca Brush, Colorado Plateau Rock Art" by Ekkehart Malotki and Donald E. Weaver, Jr. (for whom I used to work). Fascinating. Lots of great theories about who did it and why, too.
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I sent this to my son, who shared a love of Hitchhiker with me (and often hitchhiked back in the more innocent '80s). I hope he will in turn impress upon my grandson the importance of the towel. I'm sure he will!
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Sphinx cats are sweet and deserve to be treated better than that. I am appalled. My friend/neighbor has two who are lovely animals, very affectionate.
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This is one of the famous "mummies of Urumchi," an absolutely fascinating book about which is available, Written by well-known textile expert Elizabeth Wayland Barber. Here's what Amazon says about it -

The 2000-year-old mummies of Ürümchi, found in central Asia along the famed Silk Road trading route, are so well preserved as to show clearly that they seem to be of Caucasoid origin. Where did these people come from? Where did they go? You can find their pale-skinned, light-haired descendents among the people of the region, but the story of their presence in this forbidding land leaves more mysteries than it answers. Mass migrations during the Bronze Age scattered many peoples across Europe and Asia, and these startlingly lively-looking mummies may help answer some questions about this period of human history. Their intact, fantastically colored and patterned clothing captures much of author Elizabeth Wayland Barber's attention--she is an expert on prehistoric textiles. Her enthusiastic descriptions of the sewing skills of these migrant people, while focusing on details, lend an immediacy to this fascinating tale. Black-and-white as well as color photos, maps, and diagrams illustrate Barber's colorful tale of anthropology (Therese Littleton).

The Chinese government has stopped allowing people to study these mummies because of their campaign to rewrite history and claim that this region of China has "always been part of China." (Sound familiar? That's what they say about Tibet, also). They hate the "Caucasian" aspect of these people (red and blond hair, blue eyes, etc.). I can't recommend this book highly enough to anyone interested in anthropology, history, human origins, arts and crafts, even. It's a page turner, which is odd for a book written about what could be a dry and academic subject. Barber brings it all to life.
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My friend and next door neighbor has two of these Egyptian Sphynx cats, Rupert (Boo-Boo) and Noni. They are great cats! So affectionate and sweet, intelligent and funny. They feel like suede when you pet them -- not gross at all, but warm and soft. They love to talk and fly through the air, so go outside and roll in the dirt. Noni also loves to swim with my friend when he's taking a bath.
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Well, I have a tv, but it only goes on when we (me and my best friend) want to watch a movie or a dvd (documentaries sometimes). As far as those people wondering what it is that we DO if not sitting passively in front of the screen, well, for instance, we are working on shows for our theater company (rehearsals or performances almost every night) or between shows, writing/editing/marketing (I have 3 free-lance jobs that involve editing or writing or suchlike), cooking fabulous meals, reading books, volunteering for a variety of non-profits, meditating, playing with the cats -- in other words, engaged in real life (well, I guess you can call theatre "real" life -- at least it's got live people to interact with) instead of just being a sponge, just sitting there looking at shadows on a screen -- illusions instead of reality. Come on people, it's not snobbery -- I used to watch a bit, especially when my husband was dying, and I would keep him company as he watched the Food Network and Chuck Norris (go figure!), but after he died, I realized that there were just too many other fascinating activities luring me away from the tube. I'm not up on a high horse, just honestly not really interested in what's happening in that world. Which is ironic, since one of my writing projects was a sitcom I developed with a friend (that never went anywhere since neither of us had any Hollywood connections). I read the newspaper, listen to NPR and surf the web for information, look at clips on YouTube sometimes (we love MadTV), but haven't the patience, I guess, to just sit -- I'm always thinking of something else I should be doing, so tend to just do it and never even think of turning on the tv. We actually were planning to watch the opening ceremonies of the Olympics, but just are not in the habit of turning on the tv, so missed it. Oh well, no big deal. Ephemera is all it is. Not anything lasting or significant, really, if you are honest about it. Even good tv is pretty insubstantial compared to art. Is it possible for anything on tv to even approach art? I don't know. Maybe something on PBS occasionally. A great documentary (but we tend to get those from Netflix so we can watch them at our leisure). Mostly, not. I don't plan to get a digital converter box (although maybe for the 3 times annually we DO turn on the box -- for the Tonys, the Oscars, the Emmies)? We'll see.
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The city-owned parking garage here in downtown Tucson is also green -- here's a quote from the brochure:

With a fully automated payment system and round-the-clock security, it is Tucson's first 24-hour parking structure. The facility’s power consumption is
supplemented with solar panels that provide 50Kw of electricity and shade to vehicles on the rooftop. The on-line system is tied directly into the
City’s power network minimizing waste of unused solar energy. The architectural design replicates a southwestern art deco prevalent in the downtown area and identified in the City’s master plan. The historic
fabric of the site was respected by tying in design and artifacts of the original Levy’s building. The covered arcade provides protection from the Arizona sun and brings foot traffic along the retail/commercial
establishment.

Plus, it looks very cool.
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About 5 years ago, I was visiting my cousin who lives on an island off the coast of Portland, Maine, toward the end of May, and we were charmed that when we took the ferry back to Portland, on board were a whole bunch of teenagers in their fanciest finery, long dresses and tuxedoes, going to their prom by ferry. It was too cute.
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I don't think that this is technically a "guitar," but rather, a vihuela, the Spanish precursor to the guitar. Especially if it's that old. My late husband was a classical guitarist who also played vihuelas -- there were actually a number of them, tuned to different hexachords. Google "Renaissance vihuela" for a look at this fascinating instrument and its music.
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This is the stupidest "movie" I have ever seen--I can't watch more than a few minutes of the thing; it's that dreadful (although the animation isn't bad). However, I understand its origins, because my youngest daughter taught English in South Korea for 5 1/2 years and told me about their obsession with . . . well, basically . . . feces. Too odd! Three little girls of my acquaintance love "Doggy Poo," though, and their parents are not very happy that my friend actually gave them the DVD. It cracks him up. He loves stuff like that!
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A good friend of mine lost about half of one of his hands back in the late 80s shooting off (illegal) fireworks in Flagstaff, Arizona. At the time, he made up a story about what happened to his hand, but ultimately he 'fessed up. All his friends gave him a lot of grief about it, of course. Not smart, people. Leave it to the experts.
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I had lenses implanted in both eyes after cataract surgery a few years ago, and was able to ditch my glasses after many decades of having to wear them. Liberation! (I do need glasses to read and drive at night, though.)
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Profile for Dolly 2

  • Member Since 2012/08/07


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