A Book Can Change Your Life


"A book can change the story of your life," is the premise of this series of cleverly illustrated ads for Penguin Books by Y&R ad agency in Beijing, China. The print ads show events in a person's life and how reading a book could make a difference between that person becoming a criminal or a sports hero, a successful chef and, uh, a degenerate and so on.
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Ghostly Seal in the Kelp Forest and Other Amazing Underwater Photos


Since 2005, the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science has conducted an annual Underwater Photography Contest, which is open to amateur photographers. This year's contest was won by Kyle McBurnie of California with this hauntingly beautiful shot of a harbor seal floating like a ghost in a kelp forest. View more winners of the 2013 Underwater Photography Contest.
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Flower Nanostructures


By simply manipulating chemical gradients in a beaker of fluid, Wim L. Noorduin [...] has found that he can control the growth behavior of these crystals to create precisely tailored structures. [...] To create the flower structures, Noorduin and his colleagues dissolve barium chloride (a salt) and sodium silicate (also known as waterglass) into a beaker of water. Carbon dioxide from air naturally dissolves in the water, setting off a reaction which precipitates barium carbonate crystals. As a byproduct, it also lowers the pH of the solution immediately surrounding the crystals, which then triggers a reaction with the dissolved waterglass. This second reaction adds a layer of silica to the growing structures, uses up the acid from the solution, and allows the formation of barium carbonate crystals to continue.
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Global Flight Paths


Man, that's a lot of frequent flyer miles! Canadian transportation planner Michael Markieta who works at engineering firm Arup in Toronto as a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) consultant, crunched the data of more than 58,000 global flight paths and visualized them in these fantastic images:
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Illustrated Recipe: Artwork Inspired by Marie-Antoine Careme's Extravagant Food


Marie-Antoine Carême, the world's first celebrity chef and founder of the concept of haute cuisine, continues to inspire us today, some 180 years after his death. The King of Chefs, and the Chef of Kings, as he's often called, and his eccentric culinary creations are the inspiration of an art exhibition in Brighton, United Kingdom, titled The Illustrated Recipe. The art show, hosted by Gallery 40 and Cameron Contemporary Art, features five British artists who are experts in six very different mediums of art: paint (Kirsty Wither), crochet (Kate Jenkins), collage (Ed Kluz), denim (Ian Berry), digital illustration (Sarah Arnett), and cake (Annabel de Vetten of Conjurer's Kitchen). Below are some sample of the exhibited artwork:
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Smeared Skies by Matt Molloy


It's not easy to improve upon the gorgeous skies that Mother Nature paints herself, but photographer Matt Molloy managed to pull it off: the Canadian photographer stitched together a composite of hundreds of individual photographs to create stunningly beautiful effects in this "time stacks" photography series.
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Vertical Horizon


After photographer Romain Jacquet-Lagrèze arrived in Hong Kong in 2009, he became fascinated by the character of the city's urban spaces, with gleaming, modern buildings standing side-by-side with traditional tong lau tenements. As he continued his exploration of the city, Romain realized that his fascination stemmed from the sense of awe that one feels when gazing up from the foot of skyscrapers. In his photography series and art book Vertical Horizon, Romain captured the architectural majesty of gigantic skyscrapers from below.
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The Guardians of Time


These mysterious hooded creatures are the Guardians of Time, a sculpture by Austrian artist Manfred Kielnhofer. The illuminated Guardians appear every night at a new place - currently, they are located in Dubai for Art Dubai Week 2013. The life-size sculptures look great during the day, but at night ... that's when they're truly stunning.
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Tunnels to Manhattan


If this looks like an entrance to a world completely alien to most of us, that's because it is. These tunnels lead to Manhattan. Photographer Patrick Cashin snapped these amazing photos of the East Side Access project for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, showing the progress of the underground tunneling project that will allow the Long Island Rail Road to access Grand Central Terminal. Clearly, these magnificent photos show that tunneling projects are never boring
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Toy Stories by Gabriele Galimberti: Fantastic Photos of Children from Around the World with Their Prized Possessions


All kids love toys, but how kids from around the world play with them show striking cultural differences and some comforting similarities. In his Toy Stories photo series, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti spent 18 months photographing children from around the world and their most prized toy possessions.
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Magnificent Photography of Engineering in Action


We've featured a lot of neat photography on Neatorama, but looking back in the archives, these images are usually of artwork, animals, and landscapes. But who says that great photography has to be just that? Why not great photography of engineering in action? That's exactly what Engineering News-Record just did with their 2012 The Year in Construction Photo Contest. The magazine has picked the best engineering-focused photos from both professional and amateur photographers.
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Carrot Eye Chart


Your mom probably told you that eating carrots would improve your vision. That turned out to be a clever lie instigated by the British during World War II to cover up their new radar system that helped Royal Air Force's pilots in spotting enemy planes. The British intelligence spread a rumor that pilots were fed carrots to help improve their vision - and the public bought it! To poke fun at this carrot myth, photographer Henry Hargreaves and food stylist Nicole Heffron collaborated to create this fun little project: the Carrot Eye Chart.
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Spot the Hidden LEGO: Gorgeous In Pieces Artwork by Dean West and Nathan Sawaya


See the thing made out of LEGO? Look closely. Photographer Dean West and LEGO master sculptor Nathan Sawaya collaborated to create the art series In Pieces, where structures made from LEGO pieces are hidden somewhere in each image. The photographs themselves are gorgeous, but additional twist of the hidden LEGO definitely added to their surrealistic nature. In the age of Photoshop, West and Sawaya's artwork bring up the question of just how much of the photograph is real and how much is manipulated.
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