Everyday Life in New York City in the 1890s

Social reformer and photojournalist Jacob Riis took many pictures of New York City in the 1890s to show how “the other half” lives. Those pictures are now part of The City Museum, and a selection is online at Vintage Everyday. These pictures show the streets of the city, the back alleys, tenements, poorhouses, schools, sweatshops, and makeshift livings spaces for the struggling poor of the era.

As you see how much has changed in the past century, you also realize that cities still have sweatshop workers, homeless people, crowded slums, and marginalized folks getting by the best they can. -via mental_floss


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The photos are all fascinating, but I'm particularly struck with this one above, captioned:

An old woman with the plank she sleeps on at the Eldridge Street Station women's lodging room.
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