Scientists Tell Their Favorite Jokes

(Statistics t-shirt now on sale at the NeatoShop)

A statistician gave birth to twins, but only had one of them baptised. She kept the other as a control.

Get it? That's a good one by David Spiegelhalter, a professor of statistics at the University of Cambridge. The Guardian asked scientists in different fields, including chemistry, physics, biology, engineering and psychology, to tell their favorite intellectual jokes. Here are a few more examples:

An interviewer approaches a variety of scientists, and asks them: "Is it true that all odd numbers are prime?" The mathematician rejects the conjecture. "One is prime, three is prime, five is prime, seven is prime, but nine is not. The conjecture is false." The physicist is less certain. "One is prime, three is prime, five is prime, seven is prime, but nine is not. Then again 11 is and so is 13. Up to the limits of measurement error, the conjecture appears to be true." The psychologist says: "One is prime, three is prime, five is prime, seven is prime, nine is not. Eleven is and so is 13. The result is statistically significant." The artist says: "One is prime, three is prime, five is prime, seven is prime, nine is prime. It's true, all odd numbers are prime!"
Gary Marcus, professor of psychology, New York University [...]

Psychiatrist to patient: "Don't worry. You're not deluded. You only think you are."

I heard this joke from my husband, my source of all good jokes. It is a variation of the type of joke I particularly like: a paradoxical twist of meaning. Here the surprising paradox is that you can at once be deluded and not deluded. This links to an aspect of my work that goes under the label "mentalising" and involves attributing thoughts to oneself and others. It's a mechanism that works beautifully, but the joke reveals how it can go wrong.
Uta Frith, professor in cognitive neuroscience, University College London [...]

At a party for functions, ex is at the bar looking despondent. The barman says: "Why don't you go and integrate?" To which ex replies: "It would not make any difference."

Heard by my daughter in a student bar in Oxford. 
Jean-Paul Vincent, head of developmental biology, National Institute for Medical Research [...]

-via Marginal Revolution


Commenting is closed.





Check out Twaggies' very funny clip:

Om Nom - Twaggies by Twaggies
Email This Post to a Friend
"Scientists Tell Their Favorite Jokes"

Separate multiple emails with a comma. Limit 5.

 

Success! Your email has been sent!

close window