Scientists Resurrect Freaky Extinct Frog That Gives Birth through Its Mouth

frog

Australia's gastric-brooding frog doesn't just hold its young in its mouth, but actually incubates the eggs in its stomach. Or, rather, it did. The species has been extinct since the 80s. But that didn't stop scientists from cloning an embryo from frozen remains:

Even though the gastric-brooding frog has been extinct for decades, it's possible to do this because individual specimens were kept preserved in, believe it or not, everyday deep freezers. When going through somatic-cell nuclear transfer, the eggs began to divide and form into the early embryo stage.

The embryos didn't survive much longer than that, but it was confirmed that these embryos contain genetic information from the gastric-brooding frog--that yes, in fact, they have brought it back to life. The researchers are confident that this is a "technical, not biological" problem at this stage to breed gastric-brooding frogs to adulthood. This is a big step forward for the worldwide attempts to revive extinct animals--the Lazarus Project researchers will soon meet with those working to revive the woolly mammoth, dodo, and other extinct beasties to share what they've learned.

Oh, and in case you were wondering: the gastric-brooding frog lays eggs, which are coated in a substance called prostaglandin. This substance causes the frog to stop producing gastric acid in its stomach, thus making the frog's stomach a very nice place for eggs to be. So the frog swallows the eggs, incubates them in her gut, and when they hatch, the baby frogs crawl out her mouth. How delightfully weird!

Link | Photo: Australian Government Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts

Love cute animals? View more at Lifestyles of the Cute and Cuddly blog

Newest 3
Newest 3 Comments

Commenting is closed.





Check out Twaggies' very funny clip:

Tech Fails - Twaggies by Twaggies
Email This Post to a Friend
"Scientists Resurrect Freaky Extinct Frog That Gives Birth through Its Mouth"

Separate multiple emails with a comma. Limit 5.

 

Success! Your email has been sent!

close window