The Mysterious Oreo Logo

Nabisco first unveiled the Oreo in 1912, then marked with a distinctive logo on the outer cookie shingles. In changed in 1924, and then acquired its current form in 1954. Oreo enthusiasts have studied the logos extensively, searching for their meanings:

The circle topped with a two-bar cross in which the word “OREO” resides is a variant of the Nabisco logo, and is either “an early European symbol for quality” (according to Nabisco’s promotional materials) or a Cross of Lorraine, as carried by the Knights Templar into the Crusades. Continuing the Da Vinci Code-theme, the Oreo’s geometric pattern of a dot with four triangles radiating outward is either a schematic drawing of a four-leaf clover or — cue the cliffhanger music from Jaws — the cross pattée, also associated with the Knights Templar, as well as with the German military and today’s Freemasons.

Offer your own conspiracy theories in the comments.

Link -via The Mary Sue | Photo by Flickr user pumpkinsoupsauce used under Creative Commons license

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I'm an (European) brand design and history teacher, and I've to say that I've never ever seen a "two-bar cross" used as "an early European symbol for quality".
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