Human Body Myth: We Use Just 10% of Our Brains

Surely you've heard someone say that humans only use 10% of our brains (and some people even less), but that turns out to be a just myth:

William James, a psychologist in the 1800s, once metaphorically used the idea of 10% of the brain being all that was used at one time. This grew into the rumor that it was all the brain was overall and most of the rest was not understood or used as far as we know. Actually, the inactive neurons are just as important at any given moment as the ones actively firing at a point in time, and the 10% comes from varying areas at different times.

Read more human body myths at Environmental Graffiti: Link


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There is a problem with #2. While it is true that sugar doesn't make kids hyperactive it does give them more energy, just like it will give anybody more energy. And it's not just sugar, any readilly processed energy has the same effect. The thing is it's more noticeable in kids, because they're smaller. The energy in a Mars bar has got a lot more mass to drive in a 200lb adult when compared to a 50lb six year old. Any parent can tell you that kids will be more active after something like a pasta lunch. If that simple fact wasn't true pro cyclists wouldn't fill up on pasta before a race.

Another thing that's not true is that kids "burn out" after eating sugary food. OK so maybe the energy peak is higher and quicker from eating sugary food than from eating other more "healthy" food. However they will end up back at the same baseline whatever they have eaten. Sugar doesn't mysteriously sap their energy. That Sportacus has a lot to answer for.
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I was taught that in grammar school, but it's false. We use more like 90% of our brain and of course different areas are used for different things.
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