Found: Stonehenge's Second Henge

Archaeologists have found something at Stonehenge that is so exceptional that they're calling it the most exciting find there in fifty years: a second, Neolithic henge.

The new "henge" - which means a circular monument dating to Neolithic and Bronze Ages - is situated about 900m (2,950ft) from the giant stones on Salisbury Plain.

Images show it has two entrances on the north-east and south-west sides and inside the circle is a burial mound on top which appeared much later, Professor Gaffney said.

"You seem to have a large-ditched feature, but it seems to be made of individual scoops rather than just a straight trench," he said.

"When we looked a bit more closely, we then realised there was a ring of pits about a metre wide going all the way around the edge.

"When you see that as an archaeologist, you just looked at it and thought, 'that's a henge monument' - it's a timber equivalent to Stonehenge.

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Well, if you're going to build a great henge, why stop at one? Everyone loves henges.

I wonder if that's the one with the Pandorica under it?
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