Tales of Early Computing

The computer generation has become nostalgic. The blog How I Met Your Motherboard collects photographs and stories from the days before computer nerds ran the world. Consider the memories Laura has of 1984.
Along with the ZX Spectrum, my parents had also presented us with a selection of computer games. Loading them was an undertaking in itself: each fed into a cassette player, its buttons held down with thumb-numbing force, while the tape whirred and spluttered and made a sound that may be roughly transposed as chkeeewschyrrrrrfffffllychkxduhuhftttt. My brother had three games: a vampire adventure named Transylvanian Tower, a treasure hunt called Espionage Island and a complicated programme that followed the process of evolution. For me, there was a solitary cassette, a numeracy aid named Count About. I cannot deny that I was at that age rather muddled by mathematics, but it only added to my sense of dismay that my computer time would involve assisting a badly graphicked monkey clamber up a tree to collect a specified number of coconuts.

You can contribute your own memories to the collection. Link -Thanks, Jason!

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We used to have an Apple IIe, but when it broke, the "authorized" repairer refused to repair it because they felt it was an obsolete model. I've only used PCs since then.
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Our technical director is so good, that he has kept our Avid edit suite running in top condition since 1996. WindowsNT, 286 processor.

I ignore 8 critical error messages every single time I turn it on. Have of them have to do with when they changed Daylight Savings time. NT just can't hack it.

The point is, mid-90s computing sucked, I know this because I live it every time I have to use that 1996 Avid, and the limitations of Windows NT would drive me crazy if I didn't have two other edit suites rocking relatively new Final Cut/Mac Pro suites.
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