Magazine-Themed Restaurants

Upon hearing that Rolling Stone magazine plans to open its own restaurant, Slate author Justin Peters imagined reviews for restaurants opened by other magazines and news sites, such as Sports Illustrated, Esquire, and Cosmopolitan. Here's his review of The Huffington Post restaurant:

What a selection! Marvel at the 47-page menu of hot entrees, most of which are sourced from other, better restaurants. While you can't beat the price, remember that you get what you pay for: The food is often reheated and many of the "celebrity chefs" who dabble in the kitchen don't appear to know how to cook. Remember to pay cash, as the staff has been known to "aggregate" patrons' credit card numbers.


Peters is quite willing to poke fun at Slate, too:

While the dishes are sometimes unappetizing, the kitchen will occasionally convince you that everything you know about curly fries is wrong. The opinionated waitstaff makes it clear that they know what you want better than you do; don't be surprised if your order of chicken elicits a riff on why you actually wanted trout. We hope the owners know what they're doing, because the business model—the food is free, but there are ads on the plates, glasses, tablecloths, and forks—seems iffy at best.


In the comments, describe your visit to a Neatorama-themed restaurant.

Link via Hit & Run | Photo: US Department of Health and Human Services

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While the menu offers an amusing and sometimes downright interesting selection, a lot of them seem not to be served in full at the Neatorama restaurant, instead being more akin to teasers than tasters and ;eaving you craving more and more with each morsel. Many of the patrons have been sat there for hours working their way through the entire menu, including their selection of bizarre boozes and wacky wines, all served in an ever increasingly weird array of glasses and shot glasses. We really do hope that we will someday manage to figure out all of the What Is This items on the list, although we fear that this may take many weeks of eating meals while sending intricately detailed guesses covering a formerly clean tablecloth to the adjacent What Is This? café to add yet more suppositions to the already heavily annotated set menus (replaced daily, of course). Wonderfully fun, but we doubt that it would be able to stay afloat without the eclectic array of products available to buy from the shop under the counter.
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