Do Free-Range Eggs Taste Better?

Carl Huber of theWAREHOUSE blog talked to a chicken farmer who was selling organic (though not "certified organic" - apparently, getting certified is an expensive process), free-range eggs in a farmer's market. Naturally, the guy was touting all of the benefits of his eggs as compared to regular eggs from the grocery store.

So Carl did the next logical step: he performed a scientific test to compare the two.

We each had half of each egg. The tastes were totally different! I honestly did not think there would be much of a difference, especially since I don't have the world's most developed sense of taste, but in a side by side comparison: there is no comparison. The grocery store brand seemed watered down, flimsy and pale. The robust taste of the public market eggs was immediately noticeable. I really thought it might be something only noticeable by, say, testing nutrient levels in a lab. But everyone involved in the taste test (er, my wife and I) clearly preferred the public market eggs.

I'd never have guessed that free range eggs are yummier than supermarket eggs. Maybe it's time to give 'em a try: Link - Thanks Carl!

BTW, theWAREHOUSE blog is running a "fan sign" contest. You can win a prize simply by taking a picture of yourself holding a sign that says "I love theWAREHOUSE" and emailing it to him. Details here: Link - Sorry this didn't get posted before Carl, I got a little swamped!


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Well done for trying harder than the average person would, but this is still bull.

The test consisted of the absolute minimum number of subject eggs possible and was not a blind test.

The test range is so small the result are totally meaningless. Probably a pathetic attempt to try to make your unsubstantiated opinion sound scientific.
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I was wondering about the science of it, too. It's easy to taste the difference between my friend's eggs and the farmer's market eggs. The difference is that the farmer's market eggs are much less tasty than my friend's eggs. I agree that the farmer's market eggs taste more like eggs than even the organic eggs in the supermarket, but there is a range. Each farmer's eggs taste a bit different.

I'm going out on a limb here and saying that the freshness of the eggs is equal. Both farmer's market and my friends eggs include the laying dates.

Diets are markedly different. Farmer's use organic chicken feed from the feed store and plants and insects from the meadow. My friend uses food from the supermarket that has gone beyond the pull-date, plus grazing in his garden when he isn't growing anything.

So the question is, how can diet make any difference in the egg? Is there a difference in the composition of the egg, are the proteins different, or is it just a different mix of minerals in the egg?
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I have a small farm and have raised a good part of my own food for quite a while and I love my free range eggs and home grown watermelons but there is a bad side to this. I have been in Iraq for the better part of 4 years. We dont have anything but powdered eggs and the watermelons taste like cardboard.
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Yeah, the test can hardly be called "scientific".

So many other factors could have affected the results of that particular test.

I think in the Scopes monkey trial, they determined that Creationism was yummier than Evolution.
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yes! real food is better than fake food! spread the word. They tried to do this on King of the Hill the other week, but man was it... weirdly pushy and unsatisfying. Except when Hank said "You're not making any sense. Tomatoes don't taste like anything!" and Peggy said "If this is what food tastes like, what have we been eating?!"
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