Trivia: Pit Bulls and Dog Attacks

Pit bullIn the United States, pit bulls make up less than 3% of the dog population but cause more than 50% of serious dog attacks.

Most dog bites are from mutts (mixed breed), German shepherds and chow chows. Most fatal attacks are by rottweilers and pit bulls. (Source)


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Let's just say we could somehow get rid of all the "pit bulls" in the whole world. Heck, let's throw in all the Rottweillers and Chow Chows.
*POOF* They're al gone.

Guess what you're left with? You still have all the people that made the mean dogs mean. You still have all the sickos that abuse animals. You still have all the ignorant people who don't know how to properly train and manage a dog.

Those same people would just get another breed of dog, and ruin them.

This is a PEOPLE PROBLEM, not a dog problem.
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Ok, so this dude got his statistics on the "United States" from just two states: Texas and Nevada. The Texas stats are over 10 years old. And the Nevada report, from 1999 to 2002, doesn't even mention breeds... it does, however, say this:
"Often people ask what breed of dogs are most dangerous? The question can be prompted by a high profile attack by a specific dog or may be the result of media driven portrayals of a specific breed deemed "dangerous"... Singling out one or two
specific breeds for control can result in a false sense of accomplishment. This often ignores the true scope of the problem at hand."

The truth is, there are no reliable population statistics for ANY breed, since that would require widespread breed registration. There are some small registries, but how many people actually use them? How many pit bull owners do you think are going to bother? How can we say that pit bull make up 3% of the dog population when A) we aren't even sure how big the dog population is, and B) we have NO CLUE how many of them are "pit bulls?"
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Ok, so this dude got his statistics on the "United States" from just two states: Texas and Nevada. The Texas stats are over 10 years old. And the Nevada report, from 1999 to 2002, doesn't even mention breeds... it does, however, say this:
"Often people ask what breed of dogs are most dangerous? The question can be prompted by a high profile attack by a specific dog or may be the result of media driven portrayals of a specific breed deemed "dangerous"... Singling out one or two
specific breeds for control can result in a false sense of accomplishment. This often ignores the true scope of the problem at hand."

The truth is, there are no reliable population statistics for ANY breed, since that would require widespread breed registration. There are some small registries, but how many people actually use them? How many pit bull owners do you think are going to bother? How can we say that pit bull make up 3% of the dog population when A) we aren't even sure how big the dog population is, and B) we have NO CLUE how many of them are "pit bulls?"
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I have been raised around pit bulls, and to say that people that own them have a weird agenda....come on...I have never once been bitten or even growled at by one of our dogs or a friends dog. That being said I have been attacked by a golden retriever and had to have half of my faced stitched up..and it was a family dog. I have a pit bull and I would def get another when mine passes. They are great loving dogs that get along perfect will people of all ages and other dogs as well. But we have trained our dogs around other dogs and children and make sure we spend lots of time training them.
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